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Men and Muddy Boots

Debby's picture

What is it with men and their muddy boots?  Why is it that they think if they 'tip-toe' to the table they won't leave any dirt on the newly cleaned kitchen floor?  Yet, sure enough, there are big wet globs of caked on dirt that have fallen out of the treads of those boots and now lay scattered about the floor--a sorry sight!  And yet two nights ago this same man was the first to jump on our 11 year old son who had decided to put on his baseball cleats in the kitchen!  (At least the mud that fell was dry and easily swept up!)  "Your mother works hard to blah, blah, blah........."  I dunno, I just don't get it!


Debby

Biscuit's picture

(post #47533, reply #1 of 128)

If you ever do, please explain it to me. 


To be fair, though - I will say that my husbands good traits and helpfulness far outweigh the occasional annoyances he visits upon me. (G)


I'm not mean - you're just a sissy.

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

Debby's picture

(post #47533, reply #2 of 128)

Actually, I think the 'men' are really little boys at heart!  They try to be more adult at times, and yet they just can't make it stick  <G> :)


I think it was the actual 'tip-toeing' that did me in! lol


Debby


 

Biscuit's picture

(post #47533, reply #3 of 128)

(G)  Yea - he obviously TRIED to be careful! 


Perhaps you could do as I finally did?  Get a couple of those butt-ugly boot trays and put one by each door, along with a butt ugly mat and perhaps a bench where they can sit and take off their boots?  My DH has an issue with muddy boots, too.  And it's usually on the very day I spend several hours on my hands and knees scrubbing and waxing the entry, kitchen and back stairs. (G)  None of it is attractive but - well, I am not sure we can have everything - although Heaven knows I try!


[sigh...] 


I'm not mean - you're just a sissy.

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #47533, reply #6 of 128)

hey, at least it's just mud.
try scrubbing diesel engine sooty oil out of pale blue carpet!
Secret Weapon: Krud Kutter!


but still.


~RuthAnn
foom!


~RuthAnn

CanadianCook's picture

(post #47533, reply #24 of 128)

Actually I think it's a tie between how often my DW does this and myself. And, well, as far as being a "boy", I think it depends...while I won't disagree with you, I spend all day being a "mature adult" to a couple of thousand teenagers in a building. Also, I work with a person, a woman mind you, who could be my mother, whom I feel I have to "parent" - some people, regardless of gender and age, can be very childish.


Still, I can only speak for myself and I get yer drift, Debby! Cheers!


 


"Cooking is not about shouting at your food, but there's also nothing wrong with shouting at your food." - Michael Ruhlman on Emeril

Ahhh Laaaa Laaaa Ahhhhh Laaaaa -

Sage, January 2008

 

beebuzzled's picture

(post #47533, reply #4 of 128)

It's not just men. Both of my kids do it too. Every time I see them attempt this I say "The funny walk does nothing to keep the floor clean. OUT!" The only problem with this is that it came back to bite me. I had my shoes on and was on my way out the door when I  remembered that I left something on the kitchen table. Halfway across the floor, both kids yelled, you guessed it: "The funny walk does nothing to keep the floor clean, Mom. OUT!"  Guilty as charged.


 


Why is the rum always gone?  Captain Jack Sparrow
Why is the rum always gone?  Captain Jack Sparrow
Canuck's picture

(post #47533, reply #7 of 128)

My kids do it too, or DD#3 (10 years old) will crawl across the floor, shoes in the air, to get what she needs. It would be so much easier and quicker to take off the shoes, but noooo....

samchang's picture

(post #47533, reply #5 of 128)

Hey, not just us guys! Rule #1 of entering our house: shoes off! For utility people we have a box of shoe covers.

Nightrider's picture

(post #47533, reply #8 of 128)

ugh...it drives me nuts when people (guests) walk around our place with their shoes on - after they've seen us remove ours!  My DMIL walks around on the Brazilian cherry hardwood in stilettos (and says "it's too hard to take them off").  I keep having mini-heart attacks the whole time she's there, imagining all the little divots she's putting into our beautiful floor!

ashleyd's picture

(post #47533, reply #9 of 128)

Oh dear, I must mend my ways! My bad habits start at home where all our floors (especially those with direct access to the outside) were chosen for practicality and ease of cleaning. If somebody walks into the kitchen with dirty shoes so what, the floor is going to get swept/mopped soon enough anyway, takes a couple of minutes. Life is too short to waste it on high-maintenance flooring.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

MadMom's picture

(post #47533, reply #10 of 128)

I'm with you.  To me, part of the beauty of a wood floor is the patina it develops from the stilleto heels and other nasties thrust upon it.  As you said, life's too short to worry about it.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Canuck's picture

(post #47533, reply #12 of 128)

Hmm. When we renovated we spent a lot of our budget on hardwood floors and did without elsewhere. It is customary in this part of the country to take off your shoes in someone's house (I assume due to weather) and I can't think of anyone who doesn't request it. I found it hugely irritating that one family member simply refused to do this a couple of timesIt seems a passive-aggressive action since she knew it bothered me. I eventually asked her right at the door to remove them and she's done so ever since.


Lord knows, I'm not hugely fussy, but I'll be damned if someone will damage my floors deliberately. Life is certainly too short for some things, but I hope to live with this flooring for at least 40 years, and I think she's the one being short-sighted in terms of respecting my home and my requests.


Like Nightrider said above, it takes away a lot of the pleasure of visiting knowing that you're on edge about this and that your loved one is doing it knowing it drives you nuts.


Rant over. :)

Jean's picture

(post #47533, reply #13 of 128)

From the other viewpoint--I've had a sister-in-law holler at us from another room to take off our shoes when we walked in the door.  It takes a lot of pleasure out of visiting when you know the damned floors are more important to the hostess than you are. </rant>




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beebuzzled's picture

(post #47533, reply #14 of 128)

Local culture and habits play a big part in the shoes on/off debate. Out of respect for the homeowner, shoes are always removed in this part of the country. I think you're right that weather has a big part to play in the matter. Whenever we get European visitors, I always ask that they remove their shoes because they are used to keeping them on. Personally, I think that shoes on in a house is a dirty habit. You've walked in so much stuff during the day and all of that gets tracked around the house and onto bare feet which go under the bedsheets at night. Perhaps I'm lax in my approach to housekeeping, but I have much better things to do than wash the floors on a daily basis. I have done that in the past and it really is a PITA. It's much easier on the person doing most of the cleaning if everyone takes that moment and removes their shoes. My disclaimer for leaving shoes on when I'm in a hurry: I'm the one who cleans the floors. If anyone else wants to do the job after they've walked in with shoes on, they have my blessing.


 


Why is the rum always gone?  Captain Jack Sparrow
Why is the rum always gone?  Captain Jack Sparrow
Canuck's picture

(post #47533, reply #16 of 128)

I agree with every word.

MadMom's picture

(post #47533, reply #15 of 128)

I have to agree with you, but also agree with Jean.  Anyone who refuses to take off their shoes as you request is just playing mind games, and is rude.  However, it can also be rude to imply the floors are more important than the guest.  I think the key is to get floors you can be happy with, which guests can't really damage. 



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Canuck's picture

(post #47533, reply #17 of 128)

I'm not being stroppy, honestly, but considering I had the problem with only her, and really want these floors (and saved for them) I think she should be more considerate. When in Rome....


I also think that because she's never lived in a house (where the owner is responsible for replacing floors) and does have a cleaning woman, she may not realize the scouring that wood gets from shoes.

samchang's picture

(post #47533, reply #18 of 128)

>I'm not being *stroppy*[.]<

Love that word. I looked it up. Apparently it means "bolshy."

Crystal clear!

Canuck's picture

(post #47533, reply #21 of 128)

It does mean bolshy! My formative years were in England, so "bolshy" "stroppy" and "she's a cow" were favoured phrases.

dilly's picture

(post #47533, reply #121 of 128)

English question that's been bothering me: How much is a stone, when referred to as weight?

MadMom's picture

(post #47533, reply #123 of 128)

I think it's 14 lbs.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

dilly's picture

(post #47533, reply #124 of 128)

Thanks, I read a lot of Martha Grimes books, and Elizabeth George's, and they never give you a comparison.

MadMom's picture

(post #47533, reply #125 of 128)

My DD's Irish DMIL refers to stones quite often, says she has gained a stone since she gave up smoking (which means she went from a size 4 to maybe a 6?)



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

samchang's picture

(post #47533, reply #127 of 128)

Gotta love these old style measurements. Let's have weight be a base 16, unless it's for heavier weights, in which case we'll make it base 14.

Hurrah for the metric system, I say!

MadMom's picture

(post #47533, reply #128 of 128)

Perhaps we should just convert our weight to kilograms.  I'd weigh less in kg than Sally does in lbs, LOL.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Canuck's picture

(post #47533, reply #126 of 128)

Yes, MM is right; 14 pounds.

TracyK's picture

(post #47533, reply #20 of 128)

I don't think it's a manners/etiquette thing, just one of those regional/cultural differences. :-)


Rare is the home in the US (at least in my mid-Atantic experience) where people will ask adult guests to remove their shoes... though in the north or the Midwest, where there are months and months of wet, yucky weather, it may be a different situation.


 


CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

Biscuit's picture

(post #47533, reply #11 of 128)

I agree with you - and - God willing - I will be replacing said high-maintenance flooring within 3 years.  But at the moment, I don't have the money to do so.  Unless someone wants to loan me about $6,000???? (G)


 


I'm not mean - you're just a sissy.

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

wonka's picture

(post #47533, reply #22 of 128)

I'm with you besides I'm the worst offender for walking around with my boots on (I put them on and then remember all the things I need from around the house).

TracyK's picture

(post #47533, reply #23 of 128)

If you want guests to remove their shoes, shouldn't you just tell them? :-)


It would never even occur to me to remove my shoes in someone else's home, and I would never interpret their removal of their shoes as some kind of signal that I should do the same.


I would actually feel I was being rude to do so, unless they specifically asked me to.


 


CT poster in bad standing since 2000.