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How to enjoy takeout food ?

Ballottine's picture

LOL. This is not a hint or attack on anyone.  I just thought perhaps some of you may get  a kick out of it. This letter to the editor appeared in today's Free for All section of the Washington Post.  There was also a longer letter criticising the paper for the article on who invented the Bundt pan. 


Want Fries With That?


The Jan. 12 Food section hit a new low. It featured a lengthy article on how to select and rewarm takeout food. The recipes included such basics as how to make a cheater chicken stock with a can of broth, water and some onions, and how to make a fish filet with some chopped fruit salsa. Perhaps the best article described the history of the Bundt cake.


I can only guess that the editors have given up on serious food and are catering solely to readers who are too busy to cook. With this demographic in mind, I look forward to features on techniques for microwaving pizza (how to keep that crispy crust), which packaged Ramen noodles taste the best (surprise, store brands are less salty), and which brand of granola bar tastes best after being smashed at the bottom of a briefcase for four hours.


-- Christopher A. Cole


Washington



 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

Nobody's picture

(post #43171, reply #1 of 9)

I find less wrong with the Bundt pan story than I do the reheat-takeout story.  Geez...what's next?  Sandra Lee splashed all over the cover??  I'd have a conniption if I were to read such dreck in a newspaper food section.  Foodies buy the paper on Wednesdays (or whenever the food section is in it) specifically for valuable info and food news.


The focus is going in the wrong direction.

Sackville's picture

(post #43171, reply #2 of 9)

How sad.

On a similar note, today I went into one of our chain grocery stores (only go in them now for cleaning supplies -- buy all our food elsewhere) and I saw little plastic packs of reheatable thai coconut rice and stir-fry noodles already cooked (yes, the kind that take about 30 seconds to cook when you soak them in hot water). I didn't have the heart to look at the price they were charging.

Gretchen's picture

(post #43171, reply #3 of 9)

I heard several stories on the bundt pan and was really surprised at how "recent" it is--about the time we got married. I always thought it was a lot older than that--sort of a "traditional" German pan.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Ballottine's picture

(post #43171, reply #4 of 9)

Here is the letter to the editor about the  bundt pan


Who Brought the Bundt Cake?


Saturday, January 22, 2005; Page A15



It seems that in "The Bundt Pan Man, Letting Them Eat Cake" [Style, Jan. 11], Hank Stuever wants to have his cake and eat it too. How else could he have come up with the historically incorrect claim that the Bundt pan was "invented" in America (just the "t" in Bundt was invented here)?


Stuever writes: "According to an obituary in the Los Angeles Times, the ladies of a Minnesota chapter of Hadassah, the Jewish volunteer organization, sensed the need 55 years ago and went to the Dalquists at Nordic Ware with a request: Please replicate this old ceramic dish that somebody's grandmother had kept for years and years to bake a dessert called kugelhopf."


The meanings of "replicate" are "duplicate" or "repeat," a far cry from "invent." Actually, the pan had been invented and used in Europe much earlier. So what did H. David Dalquist really replicate back then?


Webster's Third New International Dictionary gives an answer under the German names "gugelhupf," "kugelhopf" or "gugelhopf" : a semisweet cake usually of yeast-leavened dough containing raisins, citron and nuts and baked in a fluted tube pan. And the German Brockhaus Dictionary of 1935 defines the cake baked in a fluted and grooved pan as "gugelhupf," a term used primarily in southern Germany and Austria (and with some linguistic roots traced to Latin). In northern Germany it is called "bundkuchen." Contrary to Stuever's somewhat mystic translation effort in this context, the German word "bund" originated from bundling or wrapping the cake's dough around the pan's center hole. As for the pan's fluted and grooved design, it allows for more of the dough to get exposed to the pan's inner surface than a smooth design would, and provides for a more evenly and deeper heat distribution into the dough. This specific design feature, discovered and applied hundreds of years ago in Europe, apparently was successfully replicated and copied by Dalquist.


I grew up in Germany in the 1930s, and my mother baked a gugelhupf about once a month. The gugelhupf and its pan have been ubiquitous in German households for centuries; Stuever's claim that Dalquist gave "the world" millions of Bundt pans is a bit of an exaggeration. Giving them to America would have sounded more plausible. And may H. David Dalquist rest in peace.


-- Hermann O. Pfrengle


Herndon


 


So much to cook; so little time.

 

So much to cook; so little time.

assibams's picture

(post #43171, reply #6 of 9)

Thanks for printing this! Saved me a lot of googling ;-) No wonder those pans looked so familiar LOL

"...never forget that the first syllable of convenience is con."
Bill Bryson

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Gretchen's picture

(post #43171, reply #7 of 9)

Yes, I think I read the guy's obit in the Times that recounted the history.

Gretchen

Gretchen
assibams's picture

(post #43171, reply #5 of 9)

It surprised me a lot, too. Especially since the shapes can vary a lot, but are still all named Bundt pans. Most of the shapes have separate names here (Guglhupf, Rodon, Kranzform), and were made and used long before Nordic Ware marketed them as Bundt pans in the States.


"...never forget that the first syllable of convenience is con."
Bill Bryson

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

iguana667's picture

(post #43171, reply #8 of 9)

>which brand of granola bar tastes best after being smashed at the bottom of a briefcase for four hours

I can answer this one! Those Nutrigrain cereal bars undergo a metamorphic transformation into somethink like fruit leather-- they're very yummy. I had one that had been in my pannier pocket for several months and it was quite tasty even though it looked awful. Or maybe I was just pregnant and ravenous! So, should I send in a freelance column to the Post?

Jean's picture

(post #43171, reply #9 of 9)

OH yes! Buts it's Campbell's SELECT!  Sheeeeeeesh!



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