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How do you drink your wine?

SallyBR's picture

Hubby and I were talking about it last Friday....

we both agreed that we take a good "sniff" at it before the first sip - but after that? He started to pay attention to how he does it, and wanted to know how I do it, sure enough after a while we saw a whole bottle disappear quite fast, and the discussion was postponed for excessive "inebriation" (if there is such a word)

is there a "proper" way to do it, to fully enjoy it? Do you twirl it around your mouth a little? Do you inhale as you are sipping? before each sip? does it matter AT ALL?

 

diddidit's picture

(post #40616, reply #1 of 32)

Out of a box. Only the best for us!


did


I opened the box, and the first thing I pulled out was - well, ya know, it's just surreal being me right now...

PeterDurand's picture

(post #40616, reply #5 of 32)

I'll second that ;-)

MadMom's picture

(post #40616, reply #6 of 32)

The most important thing about drinking wine is the company you drink with.  That's why some of the finest wine I've had came from a box...the company made it special!

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

MarieLouise's picture

(post #40616, reply #12 of 32)

Yes, and that is the long version of my "it's just dinner" mantra. It's not WHAT you eat, it's how you eat it-taking time to relax, enjoy the ones you are dining with-and in the case of a dinner party, staying at the table to be with your friends over a family-style meal instead of jumping up to finish and plate multiple courses like some restaurant wannabe. Same is true for the wine you drink. The more I know about wine, the less I care about the details. Another example of the 80/20 rule.

gjander's picture

(post #40616, reply #2 of 32)

This article gives a pretty good summary of the process of tasting wine.  Personally, I think there is a big difference in tasting wine and drinking it for pleasure.  I find that some of the rituals (sloshing, inhaling, spitting) involved in tasting may help in making determinations about a wine's characteristics and quality but detract from my enjoyment of it.  For instance, sloshing a wine around tends to bring out more of the alcohol and acidity making it seem harsher than it would if I sipped it normally.  And spitting, well there are some obvious downsides to that.


Gary


http://www.winespectator.com/Wine/Archives/Show_Article/0,1275,893,00.html

Fledge's picture

(post #40616, reply #7 of 32)

lol!

Ragin Cajun

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

MarieLouise's picture

(post #40616, reply #3 of 32)

I just drink it and enjoy it for the pleasant beverage that it is-no swirling, no fussing, no hand-wringing as to whether or not it's a perfect match, or a perfect year, and NO wine adjective-filled pontification at the table. I have nice wineglasses and a good corkscrew-that's about as far as I will go down the wine snob path.

A continuation of my blasphemous philosophy of "it's just dinner."

Biscuits's picture

(post #40616, reply #4 of 32)

There is a big difference in doing a wine "tasting" and just drinking for pleasure.


For our part, we are like you, Sally.  Before our initial sip there is the swirl to look at the color, then a nice long sniff, then a sip, decided what we think, then just drinkin'!  (G) 


Speaking of wine, I just found an incredible Pinot - Foris Pinot Noir, 1999.  Wonderful!


 


 


wtf    Biscuit

Ancora Imparo -

Fledge's picture

(post #40616, reply #8 of 32)

lol!


I am with you on that one.  I do like my new Spiegelau glasses though, thanks to MadMom and our little field trip to IWA.  And I LOVE the little squiggy, swiggie, sweagie...callitawhatchama thing to reach in and glass the glasses.  Next time I want the decanter one.


Thanks MadMom, even though she called me her trailer trash friend, right there in front of God and everybody.


Ragin Cajun

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

Fledge's picture

(post #40616, reply #9 of 32)

If I were in France like you, I would make it last as long as I could, taking in the whole experience.


At home...well...that's different.


Ragin Cajun

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

RuthWells's picture

(post #40616, reply #10 of 32)

The only "proper" way to enjoy wine in my house is to wait until the kids are in bed!!!


LOL!


 


Ruth Wells


"I think that men make more mistakes
by being too clever
than by being too good." - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

ElGrandePapa's picture

(post #40616, reply #11 of 32)

Let me get this straight: You're living in Paris, with the love of life, no little kids around, drinking a bottle of wine, probably over a nice dinner, and you're worried about your tasting skills? Please tell me that romance isn't dead. As Paul Harvey would say,"...and now the rest of the story."

El Grande Papa(Living large in the Pacific Northwest)

El Grande Papa(Living large in the Pacific Northwest)
SallyBR's picture

(post #40616, reply #13 of 32)

Oh, boy....

my post was really not meant to be taken THAT seriously! :-)

Nope, I am not worried about tasting skills - and nope, romance is not dead, but I will skip the details of our "after wine tasting feast"... :-)

we were in fact having a lot of fun trying to find ways to smell the wine as we drank it , and see if it made any difference - apart from coughing a bit of wine through my nose, and spilling some down my chin... it was a memorable evening!

 

Biscuits's picture

(post #40616, reply #14 of 32)

You are so lucky, Sally.  I get really jealous in a mellow sort of way every time I read your posts about the goings on in Paris.  I would love to live in another country again.  Living in Europe was fantastic...

 


 


wtf    Biscuit

Ancora Imparo -

SallyBR's picture

(post #40616, reply #15 of 32)

Don t worry, we have plenty of things to be irritated about here, mostly concerning work.

:-)

I will never understand how things can be soooooooooooooo complicated here, when they COULD be simple. Particularly today, I feel like taking the next plane back to the US of A, so I could actually get some work done.

There. I vented....

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #40616, reply #16 of 32)

I will never understand how things can be soooooooooooooo complicated here


It is the French paradox (and I DO know what that really is!). Have you read Adam Gopnik's Paris to the Moon?  He has several instances of the "French way". SO funny--if you're not trying to cope with it.


As for wine tasting, the glass really can make a difference.  AND swirling red wine can really make a difference--indeed not making it harsher and more acidic but smoother and fuller as it aerates.  Had a BIG time instance of that last week with a red.  It was nigh undrinkable for its acid, tannin, and for lack of a better word, "thinness".  DH poured it in a pitcher and  stirred and stirred.  It finally did come around. 
I love the Riedel burgundy (I think) glasses--tall.


Gretchen
Gretchen
PeterDurand's picture

(post #40616, reply #17 of 32)

I can understand that. A number of times I have opened a bottle, poured and it tasted, well, like s h i t. Left the damn thing there and came back later and, lo and behold, it was quite good (and no, had not hit the single malt in the meantime). I had always thought that letting red wine "breath" was so much nonsense, but one again was proven wrong.

Cheers,

Peter

MarieLouise's picture

(post #40616, reply #18 of 32)

I thought someone (Wine Spectator perhaps) had totally debunked that theory of aeration changing the taste of wine. (See I'm not a total heathen-I do occasionally read about wine, LOL.)

PeterDurand's picture

(post #40616, reply #19 of 32)

Wouldn't know. The only serious reading I do on wine is the price tag ;-)

Cheers,

Peter

MessyCook's picture

(post #40616, reply #20 of 32)

It may sound silly, but when tasting a wine, I chew it.


This allows it to flow over your tastebuds quite nicely and taste all its different flavours.  I little inhale through lips almost closed (but a little "O" opening in the middle enhances the "finish".


Anyhoo...works for me.

TracyK's picture

(post #40616, reply #21 of 32)

Hadn't heard anything about that. Aeration changes the taste of water, though, so I don't know how inclined I'd be to believe that it's been debunked.


But... taste is a very subjective thing. And quite open to the power of suggestion. I'd love to participate in a blind taste test sometime.



"Noncooks think it's silly to invest two hours' work in two minutes' enjoyment; but if cooking is evanescent, so is the ballet."


Julia Child

gjander's picture

(post #40616, reply #22 of 32)

Speaking of blind tastings, did anyone read the article in the New Yorker's food issue that claimed many tasters couldn't tell the difference between red and white wines when tasted at room temperature without any visual cues?  I'm highly skeptical but am still interested in doing a similar test just out of curiosity.


Gary


 

MadMom's picture

(post #40616, reply #23 of 32)

Now, that is really interesting!  Maybe all of us who say we prefer red wines would be just as happy with a white at room temp?  Don't really think so, but it might be worth a test.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

gjander's picture

(post #40616, reply #24 of 32)

Since I read the article I've been paying particular attention when I drink whites and really find it hard to believe I couldn't pick one out of a room temperature line up.  I'm sure there are a few fringe cases of very light reds and full-bodied whites where it might be more difficult to distinguish between the two though.

Gretchen's picture

(post #40616, reply #25 of 32)

Maybe all of us who say we prefer red wines would be just as happy with a white at room temp?


I do drink white wine at room temp. 


Gretchen
Gretchen
Fledge's picture

(post #40616, reply #26 of 32)

I can't believe it.  So do I.  To me, it kills the flavor if cold, like a tomato.

Ragin Cajun

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

PeterDurand's picture

(post #40616, reply #29 of 32)

I am with you on that. All we have to do is get our hands on LOTS of wine (with any luck without having to pay for it) and voila, our very own way to confirm what we like. I would be happy to be the moderator...

Cheers,

Peter

Tuck's picture

(post #40616, reply #30 of 32)

I leave the paper bag on!


~tuck
"Crisp crusts crackle crunchily"

Fledge's picture

(post #40616, reply #32 of 32)

hahahahaha! Oh tuck!

Ragin Cajun

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

Risottogirl's picture

(post #40616, reply #31 of 32)

we have plenty of things to be irritated about here


Isn't that the truth! I cherish the time I am lucky enough to spend in France, but stuff does start to annoy me a bit after about   a couple of months or so. It's very different working there than it is on vacation. There is still a "daily grind" in France.


And  regarding wine...here or there...just enjoy it!



barn's burnt down...now I can see the moon.      --Masahide


Edited 2/3/2003 11:48:43 PM ET by RISOTTOGIRL

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay