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Hey Cat People...

Philter's picture

Daughter Katya is 12 yrs old, baby Kenny is 15 months old,and our kitty named.............................................................................................Kitty, is 8.


 When is a good time to get a friend (kitten ) for Kitty, Kenny and the rest of us.


Will Kitty learn to deal with the kitten?


TIA, Phil.


"If 'tis to be,'twil be done by me."

"If 'tis to be,'twil be done by me."

BoofyQ's picture

(post #43841, reply #1 of 21)

Anytime. Just make sure you keep an eye on Kenny to make sure he doesn't terrorize the kitten :-) Sounds like Kitty has already gotten everyone used to handling her.

KItty will learn to get along - but expect a few weeks of her nose being out of joint. She'll hiss and carry on, and the kitten with be a total pain in her butt. Eventually they get along though - especially if the kitten gets the idea early on that he/she is not alpha-cat.

You'll get all sorts of opinions as to whether you should get a boy or girl kitten. In general I think male kittens get along better with existing cats (that's been my experience). I think you'll do fine with either gender though.

What is Kitty's demeanor? How does she (she/he?) deal with Kenny's presence/antics?

Be sure to spay/neuter, of course.
Good luck :-)

deejeh's picture

(post #43841, reply #2 of 21)

Probably.  Is Kitty a sociable kind of animal?  If so, she (I assume it's a she) will most likely take to it.  And if she doesn't, she'll probably just ignore it except for an occasional "I'm boss and don't you forget it" confrontation.


deej

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #43841, reply #3 of 21)

One cat is bad enough.  Never get another.  Get a dog

debe5t's picture

(post #43841, reply #6 of 21)

You grumpy old f**t.I think you are a closet cat lover.The independent nature of cats,the intelligence,the cantankerous seems to point out you are one of the cats in semi disguise.Fess up....We have all noticed your preference for fish.Deb ps: a cat is a good addition for your huge dog.

Philter's picture

(post #43841, reply #7 of 21)

Kitty is male.......(or used to be).and he tolerated Kenny's tail pulling,and hard-ish patting, now they're both getting used to each other....

"If 'tis to be,'twil be done by me."

"If 'tis to be,'twil be done by me."

assibams's picture

(post #43841, reply #8 of 21)

I'd say it all depends on the cat and his/its behavior. Our monstercat would never ever tolerate another animal in the house or even on our property, so a second cat has never been an issue here.


How does Kitty behave towards other animals? That would be the only deciding point for me. The kids can learn to stay away from a kitten, even as small as Kenny, but you are possibly making life a lot harder and stressful for Kitty.



Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

pamilyn's picture

(post #43841, reply #13 of 21)

If Kitty is a Male I would HIGHLY recomend getting a Male baby kitty. I have had cats my whole life (Three males now) and it is MUCH easier to introduce a male to an existing Alpha Male.....IMO...Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

TracyK's picture

(post #43841, reply #14 of 21)

If Kitty is a Male I would HIGHLY recomend getting a Male baby kitty. I have had cats my whole life (Three males now) and it is MUCH easier to introduce a male to an existing Alpha Male


I heard the exact opposite... that they are more likely to get along if you have a male and a female (assuming they will both be neutered).


Squirrels are just rats in cuter outfits.
       -- Carrie Bradshaw

AnnL's picture

(post #43841, reply #15 of 21)

I've had multiple cats all my life and most of my friends have multiple cats.  From this experience, 1 male and 1 female work the best.  The next best is 2 males.  The worst is 2 females.  But, this doesn't mean that 2 female cats can't live together.  It works best if they are raised together from kittens. 


However, these are all just GENERALIZATIONS.  It really all depends on each SPECIFIC animal's individual personality.  It also all works best if the animals in question are neutered.  :-) 


 


AnnL
Transitions Farm
Gardening, cooking, and riding
in Central Mass.

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #43841, reply #16 of 21)

That is the way it is for dogs.  Not sure why cats would be any different

AnnL's picture

(post #43841, reply #17 of 21)

It is a bit harder with cats, just because they're not naturally "pack" animals, like dogs.  I did have 2 alpha-bi.., err, female dogs for a time, but they both learned to defer to me as the alpha-B.  ;-)  Cats aren't quite that tractable.

AnnL
Transitions Farm
Gardening, cooking, and riding
in Central Mass.

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Adele's picture

(post #43841, reply #18 of 21)

National Geographic (August) has an article about cats & schizophrenia.  'A protozoan named Toxoplasma gondii, is commonly found in cat feces'- as well as contaminated water and undercooked meat.     


Edit:  Oh yeah, and it may cause schizophrenia- LOL


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!


Edited 7/28/2005 4:45 pm ET by Adele

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

Pomona's picture

(post #43841, reply #19 of 21)

In other words -- you may be a crazy old lady because you have so many cats, not the other way around?

pamilyn's picture

(post #43841, reply #20 of 21)

We have one older cat and tried to introduce a female....NOOOO way, brought in a male kitten and it was just fine......three years later brought in another female....NOOOO way.....brought in a male and no problem. I agree this is all generalization...JUst depends on the cats involved.

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

KarenP's picture

(post #43841, reply #21 of 21)

  Such a familiar story.  When my siamese female was six, I brought her home a friend.  It was hell.  I had to guard the kitten so it could eat.  The older would not let her off the bed so she could use the box, so we know where that led.  Every time I looked at the older cat she hissed and stomped off.  I called the breeder to arrange to bring her back.  She encouraged me to give it a little time, queen bee, new scent, only child, yaetta, yaetta, yaetta.  I really liked the personality of this kitty so I agreed.  It took a good 2 weeks but I came home from work one night to find them sleeping together.  The older cat looked like she'd been caught in a lie, stormed out of the room, hissing away.  From there, life got easy and they became best of friends.  As Ann said, the younger was not alpha in any way imaginable had she been she'd of ended up living somewhere else.

wop's picture

(post #43841, reply #9 of 21)

    Oh go on! cats aren't that bad. Our 11 year old golden retriever has one. She was a "trovatello" (found, stray) . Now she's nick's cat. She even sleeps on him still after a year and a half. Inseparable.


                                                            Philip

Biscuits's picture

(post #43841, reply #4 of 21)

We got our (then) 8 year old cat a kitten of her own.  They were fine, after an initial adjustment period.  Possum ignored the kitten at first, then dominated her (eating her food, smacking her if she got too close), but now they are inseperable.  Possum is still the Alpha, but they do love each other.


We got Bella from the Animal Control office at our police station.  They very often have kittens for adoption.  You might want to check there.


Ancora Imparo -

Ancora Imparo -

AJ12754's picture

(post #43841, reply #5 of 21)

It might be a good idea to keep the new kitty in a separate room for a few days and bring your older cat to the door (closed) to allow both cats to get used to each other's scent.  I'd also recommend separate litter boxes.


 


Good luck.

Cave obdurationem cordis

ssterling's picture

(post #43841, reply #11 of 21)

We did this for both of our new additions by putting their food on either side of a closed door. We did it this way even with our dogs and had success every time.

Biscuits's picture

(post #43841, reply #12 of 21)

Yes, that's what our vet suggested we do.  We put the kitten in a spare bedroom for 4 days.  Helped both of them adjust.  They still have their own litter box and their own food dishes, though.  Possum might love BellaBoo, but she won't share HER things.

Ancora Imparo -

Ancora Imparo -

NanaC's picture

(post #43841, reply #10 of 21)

Your question reminds me of the time we decided to get our 12 yr old, arthritic, orange tabby cat a kitten to keep him spry.  (I had read the suggestion in a magazine.)  So we bring this tiny 6 wk old, black tabby fluffball, Rutherford, into the house, tuck him into a biggish box in the DR bay window and wait for old Tigger to smell him.  Tig went up to the box, poked his nose over the side, put one paw into the box to have a better look, and all h**l broke loose!  This fluffy little thing turned into the Tasmanian Devil, hissing, snarling, and swiping at poor old Tig's nose.  Tig took off like a shot, and tiny little Ruff became alpha cat for the next 6 years.  Tig got sprier all right, from running away from that little holy terror!!

Fran

"Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we're here we might as well dance!"