NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

"Disney's Earth"- tough on kids?

msm-s's picture

A friend just offered us tickets to a preview of "Disney's Earth". She won them but isn't taking her kids , 8 and 10, because it sounds like too much for them (baby elephant dies, daddy seal dies, etc). I've googled and found similar concerns by movie critics.

Have y'all heard anything about this, and do you have any feelings about whether it would be worth the effort? BTW, DS can really flip flop about being upset by this sort of thing, and then being really adult about accepting the cycle of nature and how food chains work.

All opinions and observations welcome.

Gretchen's picture

(post #52256, reply #37 of 67)

It is ONLY that book I am talking about. I really did appreciate and find very interesting  what it said--not that I can possibly remember it now.


Autism, even now, is SO contrversial, in all its possible elements--or what it is--or what causes it.


I did not know what you posted, and that is interesting also, of course. Thanks.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #52256, reply #42 of 67)

I didn't mean to imply anything about your post, but was just adding what I consider to be interesting information. There was quite the controversy about Bettelheim, years back.

You are right about autism being a complex issue, but I do think that cold mothers have been ruled out as a cause. Hope so, at least.

Gretchen's picture

(post #52256, reply #43 of 67)

Oh,, I took nothing and was interested. I am sorry he fell into disrepute--and for such a stance about autism. Ick.  I just found that particular book interesting back in the day of my kids growing up.

Gretchen

Gretchen
CookiM0nster's picture

(post #52256, reply #44 of 67)

Yes they have.

Gretchen's picture

(post #52256, reply #45 of 67)

Just heard a wonderful interview on Terri Gross with the producer/director of the series, and comment about the Disney version.  Apparently the American and English versions differ slightly at the end. And the narration.


James Earl Jones does the American and Patrick Stewart the English.


The American ending is a collage of some of the best "shots" of the movie. The English version ends with showing the baby elephants returning to the watering hole, and the polar bear cubs grown up --as he said, to sort of complete the cycle/circle of nature from the death of the parents. And as he said, Disney knows their American audiences and they want a happy ending. Thought this was so interesting after the discussions here.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #52256, reply #46 of 67)

Not before time!

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #52256, reply #50 of 67)

No kidding.
I don't know if you've seen the latest, but they're now exploring a possible link between autism and genius.

Florida2's picture

(post #52256, reply #53 of 67)

Although, the researchers do find that 70 percent of children who have autism also have some form of mental retardation. Children with autism who do not have some form of retardation, do sometimes have some areas of functioning that are stunningly amazing .

Marcia's picture

(post #52256, reply #54 of 67)

I hadn't seen that, but I don't find it surprising. Thanks for the update.

Jillsifer's picture

(post #52256, reply #38 of 67)

Have you ever read the ORIGINAL versions of all those fairytales from the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Anderson?


Yes. They're great around Halloween.


 


 


Ask your child what he wants for dinner only if he's buying.

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

Biscuit's picture

(post #52256, reply #39 of 67)

(LOL)  You really are a terrific mom...

Statesmen will invent cheap lies, putting blame upon the nation that is attacked, and every man will be glad of those conscience-soothing falsities, and will diligently study them, and refuse to examine any refutations of them; and thus he will by and by convince himself that the war is just, and will thank God for the better sleep he enjoys after this process of grotesque self-deception.
- Mark Twain

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

Jillsifer's picture

(post #52256, reply #40 of 67)

(snort) Thank you!


Some year, we've GOT to get a group together to attend our Knott's Berry Farm Halloween Haunt. It's truly chilling and SOOOO much fun. G could take care of the younger kids--when they're a bit older than now, of course--and we could roam the park at will, challenging monsters to try to scare us.


 


 


Ask your child what he wants for dinner only if he's buying.

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #52256, reply #52 of 67)

Yes she is.  And mom to my big puppy too

Jillsifer's picture

(post #52256, reply #56 of 67)

Awwwww. <hugs Meanie>


Your big puppy is currently barking himself hoarse because he doesn't get to go "supervise" some workers my mom hired to trim the backyard trees. POOR baby.


He did manage to make off with a tuna sandwich earlier today, though. Gave me the "you talkin' ta ME????" look when I caught him swallowing the last bite.


And Jennifer the kitten thinks she can take him--through a floor-to-ceiling window, of course.


 


 


Ask your child what he wants for dinner only if he's buying.

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

Aberwacky's picture

(post #52256, reply #41 of 67)

For my senior performance piece (had to be original) I wrote a script about a kindly older lady reading fairy tales to a group of young children--the original Grimm fairy tales.  One story has a child getting his head cut off and sewn back on, etc. so the mother/stepmother could pretend he was still alive, etc. She would read just so far, get to a grisly part, realize it, and then have to make up another ending.  Lots of fun.


Leigh


"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Florida2's picture

(post #52256, reply #49 of 67)

But, maybe that is the point. These movies are "not" reality. Watching an animal die in real life is not like watching an animal die in a Disney movie. Its very emotional in a Disney movie because the animals are made to be like people, rather than like animals.


My kids grew up with a back yard farm and we nursed wild birds who were injured and so forth. They lost pet chickens to racoons, animals were born, lived and died.  They handled those mini-trauma's fine. But the movies were too much for them. Soooo, I stopped taking them to movies until they were about 10 years old. But they were not shielded from life. They were shielded from Hollywood and Disny movies.


I personally do not think movies are like life. I cringe when I see very young children at the movies being exposed to things that look too real to them and are too emotionally powerful for them.

Regality's picture

(post #52256, reply #47 of 67)


 

Bambi was the first movie I ever saw


 


I think it was for me also.  I don't remember being particularly traumatized, but I do remember being confused about what I was seeing--a motion picture itself.


Quilter's picture

(post #52256, reply #48 of 67)

Of course, when I saw it, I had never seen television, so unlike many children of later generations (mine included), I hadn't seen things like Bugs Bunny and the Roadrunner, so I was completely naive when it came to any kind of visual violence, trauma, etc. But I sure did know that Bambi's mother was dead, and boy! was I ever upset. 


By the time my kids went to Bambi (I made DH take them, I still couldn't face watching it), they had seen lots of cartoons and quite a few movies, and the death of Bambi's mother practically passed them by, unnoticed.  As my (then) 7 year old daughter said "It's just pretend mummy".  This from the child who several years later dissolved into heartbreaking sobs at the end of "The Black Stallion".  "It was just so beautiful".


I still can't watch Dumbo either.  And don't even get me started on "The Selfish Giant" or "The Little Match Girl" or "The Happy Prince". 

Biscuit's picture

(post #52256, reply #3 of 67)

Okay - someone explain this movie to me??  From the previews I saw, it looked like they took the Discovery series PLANET EARTH that ran on TV last year (and was AWESOME!) and mish-mashed pieces of it with some cute Disney music and is not presenting it as a Disney film.  Seriously - I recognized all the preview parts as parts of the Planet Earth series.  I should know - we have seen that series about 20 times.


If THAT is what it is, I have no intention of taking Max to see it.  The Planet Earth series was spectactular - it didn't need "cute-sying it up". 


And - FWIW - Max love the Planet Earth series.  All of it.  He was fine with the death that happened because he is one of those kids that sees it as a part of life.  Now if HUNTERS killed the animals, he'd be upset. 


Edited to say:  Never mind, I went to TMDB and answered my own question.  Yes, it's a feature length movie version of Planet Earth, only with cute music and focusing only on 4 animal "families" from the documentary.  Definitely not going to see it.  I hate when they take a perfectly good documentary and Disney-it-up.  Planet Earth is fabulous - it doesn't NEED to be cute.  Why do they do things like this????


Sorry - that was a soapbox moment.  I apologize - back to your regularly scheduled chat now...(g)



Statesmen will invent cheap lies, putting blame upon the nation that is attacked, and every man will be glad of those conscience-soothing falsities, and will diligently study them, and refuse to examine any refutations of them; and thus he will by and by convince himself that the war is just, and will thank God for the better sleep he enjoys after this process of grotesque self-deception.
- Mark Twain


Edited 4/18/2009 10:32 am ET by Biscuit

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

TracyK's picture

(post #52256, reply #5 of 67)

I would imagine that they do things like this because of the millions of kids out there that wouldn't have the attention span to get  through the whole Planet Earth series (which I have also seen a million times). :)


"One of the great strengths of the United States is … we do not consider ourselves a Christian nation or a Jewish nation or a Muslim nation. We consider ourselves a nation of citizens who are bound by ideals and a set of values."

                                                            --President Barack Obama

SallyBR1's picture

(post #52256, reply #7 of 67)

On a tangent - do you also like Nature series?

We had an episode saved and watched it last night - on Frogs

absolutely amazing! Fantastic little creatures those are... I am always in complete awe about the folks making these movies.

 


 


The garbage disposal is your friend. Treat it nicely.


(A little pearl of wisdom, February 2009)

Biscuit's picture

(post #52256, reply #8 of 67)

I'm not Tracy but...our family LOVES documentary shows on nature.  The Science Channel and Discovery has some fantastic shows.  Planet Earth series just blew me away.

Statesmen will invent cheap lies, putting blame upon the nation that is attacked, and every man will be glad of those conscience-soothing falsities, and will diligently study them, and refuse to examine any refutations of them; and thus he will by and by convince himself that the war is just, and will thank God for the better sleep he enjoys after this process of grotesque self-deception.
- Mark Twain

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

ashleyd's picture

(post #52256, reply #9 of 67)

Gotta love the BBC, still does it best.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #52256, reply #11 of 67)

Planet Earth is awesome. I picked it up at Costco along with the ocean one and Berend can't get enough of it. In fact, we watched the deep sea before bed tonight.

That said, Jasper finds it boring and can't watch more than about 5 minutes without losing interest. Of course he's only 4.

wonka's picture

(post #52256, reply #19 of 67)

Don't ever change, I love you the way you are, lol.

Biscuit's picture

(post #52256, reply #21 of 67)

Thank you! (G)  I worry sometimes that I rant a little too much.

Statesmen will invent cheap lies, putting blame upon the nation that is attacked, and every man will be glad of those conscience-soothing falsities, and will diligently study them, and refuse to examine any refutations of them; and thus he will by and by convince himself that the war is just, and will thank God for the better sleep he enjoys after this process of grotesque self-deception.
- Mark Twain

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

wonka's picture

(post #52256, reply #22 of 67)

You rant with style.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #52256, reply #51 of 67)

msm-s's picture

(post #52256, reply #23 of 67)

Just got back from the movie, and it was really wonderful. The dramatic soundtrack wasn't that bad (although violins while the killer shark chomped a seal WAS a tad over the top).

There were story lines about the various animals' families struggles, but nothing beyond identifying this group or that a s a mother and cubs or a hunting dad.

msm-s's picture

(post #52256, reply #26 of 67)

... Meant to post a little more, but DS was calling me. Wanted me to sit with him until he fell asleep. LOL, he was fine with the movie but it seems to have left him feeling a bit tender after all!
Tender, but not traumatized.
When he was about 4, he cried in the animated move "Home on the Range", in the scene where the animals had lost their home and were stuck out in a rain storm. Couldn't ever again listen to the sound track which he had loved before. Like others here, he is pretty affected by sad scenes, but not all sad scenes. I never know what is going to hit him hard.

Thanks for the discussion. I tend to cry when someone does something especially nice or kind, or when I hear certain music that just strikes a chord in my heart. Good to know which of you guys are softies too ;-)