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"Disney's Earth"- tough on kids?

msm-s's picture

A friend just offered us tickets to a preview of "Disney's Earth". She won them but isn't taking her kids , 8 and 10, because it sounds like too much for them (baby elephant dies, daddy seal dies, etc). I've googled and found similar concerns by movie critics.

Have y'all heard anything about this, and do you have any feelings about whether it would be worth the effort? BTW, DS can really flip flop about being upset by this sort of thing, and then being really adult about accepting the cycle of nature and how food chains work.

All opinions and observations welcome.

jrobin's picture

(post #52256, reply #1 of 67)

Good grief.  8 and 10 yr olds who can't handle death in the animal world?   My god what would she do if those kids experienced death in people?  Like a relative? 


In 10 years those kids will go off to college and out in the world---by themselves.  When do we as parents stop sheltering so much? 


Jennifer

kathymcmo's picture

(post #52256, reply #6 of 67)

In 10 years those kids will go off to college and out in the world---by themselves.  When do we as parents stop sheltering so much? 


LOL, listening to my sister tell it (She is a college professor at a top university) the answer would be "never." Instead, we become helipcopter parents who talk by cell to our kids 15 times a day to help them plot their every move, and if they get a poor grade we march into the professor's office and demand it be changed.

msm-s's picture

(post #52256, reply #10 of 67)

THAT's the problem-- I am not a helicopter parent, but I live in a helicopter parent world. Had emailed this woman back right away that we'd be glad to take the tickets, but started thinking about her concerns that her own kids would be "traumatized", and then the more i read about it, the reviews seemed to support the trauma effect, and so I asked you guys since I haven't see the movie and can't from an opinion based on firsthand experience.

To All: I've coached DS on the emotional effects of background music in the past-- ie, take ANY scene you can imagine-- ie, a person getting into a car-- and imagine what it says if there is happy music? Scary music? goofy music? etc etc etc. So, I imagine that he will be able to separate the reality from the scmaltz, with some discussion.

Anyhoo, sounds like standard-issue reality and I'm pretty sure DS is completely capable of handling it. thanks for the input!

jrobin's picture

(post #52256, reply #12 of 67)

Lol! Helicopter parent.  That's a new one!


Wow, if only those parents knew the truth.  All they teach as a parent is how to sheild.  Then the child sheilds the truth back from mom...and so it goes.


My Daughter's BF has one of those moms.  She calls him constantly and he just tells her he is in his room studying!  Meanwhile he is out on the town partying with all the other college kids. 


Jennifer


 

BillHartmann's picture

(post #52256, reply #57 of 67)

And it does not stop there.

I have now heard stores of the HP calling the kids bosses when they get out of school.

.
William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe
. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe
Jillsifer's picture

(post #52256, reply #58 of 67)

GAWD, it's hard to know when, how and how much to "cut the cord."


My beloved son is on a Boy Scout campout this weekend. We received numerous reminders about what he was supposed to take, etc. He did almost all his packing last night, then finished the last few items this afternoon. After printing ALL the e-mail messages, going over the lists with him two or three times, and reminding him about the "mental checklist" he's supposed to use, I steadfastly refused to do his packing for him. I dropped him off for the campout and headed off to do some errands. About ten minutes after the dropoff, my phone rang.


"Mommy, I forgot to bring my really cool, favorite camping pillow. Can you please bring it to me?"


I said no. (I was cordial about it, but I still refused to do it. This boy is 14 and brilliant.)


I'm currently riddled with self-recrimination, doubt and guilt. But somehow, some way, someday, this child has GOT to learn to rely on his own wits and police up his own stuff.


This is one of the few times I wish I were a drinking woman.


 


 


Ask your child what he wants for dinner only if he's buying.

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

Risottogirl's picture

(post #52256, reply #59 of 67)

Good for you!


:)


Be strong. He'll thank you later!


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

BillHartmann's picture

(post #52256, reply #60 of 67)

He is probably scared for life.

And will find a wife whose life goal is to annoy you.

<VBG>

.
William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe
. William the Geezer, the sequel to Billy the Kid - Shoe
Jillsifer's picture

(post #52256, reply #61 of 67)

a wife whose life goal is to annoy you


I know. But as long as she has a vast fortune, a REALLY long fuse for clueless, dipsh*tty behavior and no surviving relatives, it's fine. ;-)


 


 


 


Ask your child what he wants for dinner only if he's buying.

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

Biscuit's picture

(post #52256, reply #62 of 67)

Horrible mother.


Today is a gorgeous day.  GORGEOUS, and it has been crappy for so long.  PERFECT bike riding day.  Except - my son has had his bike taken away from him for 3 days because of his inability to look both ways and use extreme caution before he ZIPS OUT INTO THE STREET!!!! 


Begging, pleading for do-overs, etc., all to no avial - I stand firm on no bike for 3 days I don't care if it's the ONLY good day all year.


And I'm evil, mean, and think up these things just to torture him. 


I told him he could do yard work with me and maybe actually earn his allowance this week.  He glared at me.


Statesmen will invent cheap lies, putting blame upon the nation that is attacked, and every man will be glad of those conscience-soothing falsities, and will diligently study them, and refuse to examine any refutations of them; and thus he will by and by convince himself that the war is just, and will thank God for the better sleep he enjoys after this process of grotesque self-deception.
- Mark Twain

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

MadMom's picture

(post #52256, reply #63 of 67)

Look at it this way.  When your kid glares at you, particularly when he is Max's age, you know you are doing something right!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

tagnostic's picture

(post #52256, reply #64 of 67)

With allowances, I put all the allowance in ones in an envelope on the kitchen counter, anytime chores don't get done $1 comes out, they are told why and see it go into my pocket, back talk $1, whining $1 whats left at the end of the week is allowance.

tag

Believe Someone Seeking the Truth, Doubt Those That Have Found It
Believe Someone Seeking the Truth, Doubt Those That Have Found It
Biscuit's picture

(post #52256, reply #66 of 67)

He only gets $3, and 1/3 must go in his GIVE box (for the charity of his choice), 1/3 must go in the SAVE box (for things like vacation or some special class he wants to take) and he gets the final 1/3 for spending.  Usually, he puts his final third in his SAVE box as well.


In our house, though, we have a rule:  First we do what we HAVE to do, then we do what we WANT to do.  So basically, until chores are done, there is no TV, there is no computer, there is no bike riding, there is no friends coming over - nothing.  This generally motivates him to get it all done, although there are times...grrr....


Statesmen will invent cheap lies, putting blame upon the nation that is attacked, and every man will be glad of those conscience-soothing falsities, and will diligently study them, and refuse to examine any refutations of them; and thus he will by and by convince himself that the war is just, and will thank God for the better sleep he enjoys after this process of grotesque self-deception.
- Mark Twain

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

tagnostic's picture

(post #52256, reply #67 of 67)

rofl, in the tween years the tv was so pervasive, I got some parts from radio shack and put a keylock on the cable & VCR/DVD, the computer I had passworded with a 1hr limit before it had to be entered again, if it was being used for school work, another hour, otherwise outside for awhile.
they are too much fun to be brainwashed by the stupid box. (i don't mind alot of it, but cartoons and sitcoms have no redeeming values that i can see.)

tag

Believe Someone Seeking the Truth, Doubt Those That Have Found It
Believe Someone Seeking the Truth, Doubt Those That Have Found It
Gretchen's picture

(post #52256, reply #2 of 67)

I took DGS to see March of the Penquins when he was 4, I think. After it was over, and we were talking about it, he liked it, but said it was "sad".  The old penquin couldn't keep up and died. They didn't show it per se, but he knew.


I also took him and another little friend to see Bridge to Terabithia, not realizing what the story was.


I even have trouble watching animal shows that show these things, but it is reality. I cry. The children may cry also.


Gretchen
Gretchen
AntiCook's picture

(post #52256, reply #13 of 67)

I took Natasha to see the Winnie-the-Pooh movie when it came out, the one about Tigger going to look for his parents. I think she was around 4 or 5 (she's 15 now). She sobbed at the end of it, because Tigger never did find his parents. This was a child that never seemed to be upset about those sorts of things. To this day she said that movie makes her sad. Kids are funny that way.

The AntiCook
Cooking is for wimps!

The AntiCook
Cooking is for wimps!

MadMom's picture

(post #52256, reply #14 of 67)

Hi, AntiCook.   How are you doing?  Why don't you ever call your Mother, LOL?



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Aberwacky's picture

(post #52256, reply #15 of 67)

My 4-year old can handle fighting in movies and scenes most kids would find scary, but not if someone is sad.  He's very sensitive to other people's emotions in real life, and if someone onscreen is alone, looking sad, he doesn't like it.  No ET for him, and sounds like the Tigger movie is out, too, LOL.


We're working with him on it (being sensitive to other's people's feelings is good!) to try to help him deal with the issues in movies.


Leigh


"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Adele's picture

(post #52256, reply #16 of 67)

I'm still traumatized by Dumbo.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

MadMom's picture

(post #52256, reply #17 of 67)

...and Bambi!  I suppose Natasha comes by it honestly, having a grandmother who cries at commercials.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Aberwacky's picture

(post #52256, reply #18 of 67)

As someone else that cries at commercials (those Hallmark holiday ones really used to get to me) I could never watch a lot of Disney movies growing up.  Old Yeller?  Please--talk about trauma!  I cried every time I saw a yellow lab for years.


So, Grant comes by his sensitivity honestly, too, bless his heart.


Leigh


"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
MadMom's picture

(post #52256, reply #20 of 67)

My mother had to take both my brothers and I out of the movie theater during Lassie, Come Home because we were crying so loudly.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Quilter's picture

(post #52256, reply #24 of 67)

Bambi was the first movie I ever saw. My dad took me, and had to take me out of the theatre when Bambi's mother died because I started crying and wouldn't stop.


I still can't watch that film, some 60 years later.  Oy.

MadMom's picture

(post #52256, reply #25 of 67)

Isn't it amazing how many of the Disney films, which were ostensibly made for children, had really dark messages?  Maybe old Walt knew we shouldn't be shielded from reality.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Jillsifer's picture

(post #52256, reply #31 of 67)

many of the Disney films, which were ostensibly made for children, had really dark messages


There's actually a fair amount of scholarship around this. Along with many nursery rhymes, folk tales and other childhood standards. (How comforting IS it when you really think about "when the bough breaks, the cradle will fall, and down will come baby, cradle and all"?)


 


 


Ask your child what he wants for dinner only if he's buying.

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

Marcia's picture

(post #52256, reply #32 of 67)

Before it was cleaned up, "Little Red Riding Hood" was eaten by the wolf with no kind woodcutter to come to her rescue. Actually, it's been sanitized more since that version, I do believe.

Many of the Grimm stories are fables to keep children in line, and grim is the appropriate word. Shocking to modern sensibilities, and I'm not even all that modern. ;-)

Gretchen's picture

(post #52256, reply #33 of 67)

AND then there is always Struwelpeter   to keep little children in line!!  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
Biscuit's picture

(post #52256, reply #34 of 67)

Have you ever read the ORIGINAL versions of all those fairytales from the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Anderson?


The Little Mermaid is a perfect example.  The prince doesn't fall in love with her, the witch offers her a way out; kill him and you can get your tail and voice back.  But she doesn't kill him, can't kill him (even though he's a jerk and has no affection for her at all) and dies, her body turning to foam on the waves.


It's a sad, sad, SAD little tale.


Statesmen will invent cheap lies, putting blame upon the nation that is attacked, and every man will be glad of those conscience-soothing falsities, and will diligently study them, and refuse to examine any refutations of them; and thus he will by and by convince himself that the war is just, and will thank God for the better sleep he enjoys after this process of grotesque self-deception.
- Mark Twain

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

Gretchen's picture

(post #52256, reply #35 of 67)

There is quite a good book written 30+ years ago about fairy tales and the underlying "meanings" that are good psychology for children. The man's name begins with "B" and isn't too far off of "Berenstain", as in the "bears"!! It was a very interesting book.

Gretchen

I am SO proud of myself--Bruno Bettelheim, quoted in this article.


Edited 4/21/2009 5:06 pm ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #52256, reply #36 of 67)

Bettelheim remains a controversial figure to this day. He committed suicide, and after his death it was found that some of his credentials were falsified. He was also a proponent of the "refrigerator mother" theory of autism, which must have caused untold harm.

I think "The Uses of Enchantment" is still well regarded, and it's surely a fascinating book.