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Jillsifer's picture

This idea isn't fully formed, but can a bunch of cooks make a meaningful contribution to Hurricane Katrina relief? Can we patronize online businesses from the surrounding areas, in hopes of doing our small bit to help the economy of the affected states?


Surely there must be SOME businesses nearby (probably some distance from the worst-affected areas but still kind of close?) that are still open, that we could help?


The South is full of wonderful foods and ingredients . . . maybe we can turn our passion for food and our passion for shopping into something worthwhile?


Obviously, I'm groping here, but what do you guys think? Is there something that our CT family can do?


 


 

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

Jean's picture

(post #44013, reply #1 of 115)

Makes me wonder how far north and west the refugees will be trickling. The number of people left homeless is astounding. We can't expect the government to pick up the entire tab.  This is going to affect us all, one way or another. Gasoline here is already over $3 a gallon.

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
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help to provide free mammograms for women in need
MEANCHEF's picture

(post #44013, reply #3 of 115)

It seems to me that you are right and it is unfortunate.  This is the kind of thing where our government should step up to the #### plate.


It is so #### shamefull that we are doing this  http://costofwar.com/ as a priority instead of fixing all the problems we have at home.


Makes you want to puke.


 

ranga's picture

(post #44013, reply #9 of 115)

Thanks for getting straight to the point. I understand that the equivalent of two weeks of military spending could have fixed the problem with New Orleans levees. Hurricane damage still would've happened but the subsequent flooding from the breach of the levees could have been prevented, all those people wouldn't have had to drown or go to refugee camps.


To Jean and jill :  How to help now....quit messing with the gimmicky little fundraising ideas...contact your congressmen/women and senators and tell them to get back in session to pass a bill to allocate the necessary billions....and then prepare to pay the piper. If it seems too much then maybe you ought to address your own priorities. Picture a small child who has spent twenty-four hours in a stadium without food, water or toilet facilities...another several hours on a bus to Houston and now is being processed in a quasi military fashion into a refugee camp far from home.


I think I owe that child something.  Something HUGE.


Edited 9/1/2005 3:24 am ET by ranga

Gretchen's picture

(post #44013, reply #10 of 115)

If it seems too much then maybe you ought to address your own priorities. Picture a small child who has spent who has spent twenty-four hours in a stadium without food, water or toilet facilities...another several hours on a bus to Houston and now is being processed in a quasi military fashion into a refugee camp far from home.


WHY would you think that Jill,Jean, OR ANYone else might think it was too much? What is UP with that. 
And what would be YOUR solution to the problem of housing these people?  Please tell us.


Gretchen
Gretchen
CHandGreeson's picture

(post #44013, reply #11 of 115)

I respectfully disagree, or at least, insist on both ways. Of course, this area needs more than a bake sale, no one was saying otherwise. Please read the editorial from the Biloxi Sun Herald for a very apt assessment of aid: http://www.sunherald.com/mld/sunherald/news/special_packages/hurricane_katrina/12526270.htm

So, please, contact all the members of congress you can muster, but not only for NOLA but also Alabama and Mississippi. Coastal Mississippi lost all it's infrastructure, not just the casinos (14,000 daily jobs), but many schools and all businesses along the shoreline as well.

These people need everything. Sure, money is the fastest way to get what is needed, but did you know that there are no more chainsaws available to purchase in Gulfport and Biloxi? It will be months before homes can be rebuilt. People need more than an MRE to eat; to share a meal sustains more than the physical body, it heals the spirit.

Official money is slow and it is impersonal. It is important that we do something, not just give moeny. I would hazard a guess that you are not from the South? Personal interaction, knowing that your neighbor is right there for you, is extremely important to every person from the South I have ever met. A good idea will go far, and Jill's is as good as I have heard.

~Charlotte

Gretchen's picture

(post #44013, reply #14 of 115)

lost all it's infrastructure, not just the casinos (14,000 daily jobs),


I just heard that Harrah's will pay its employees for 90 days. Not an insignificant action.


Gretchen
Gretchen
ranga's picture

(post #44013, reply #27 of 115)

I am humbled and corrected by your reply. Every effort (especially  the personal) is needed to help the Gulf coast refugees.


I also understand that the temporary sheltering of people is an immediate response to  the crisis. It's just apparent that it's only a stop gap and that authorities did not expect the crisis to be so severe.


The geographical size of the catastrophe means that where in other circumstances near neighbours could help each other,  it just isn't possible this time.


I have sent my contribution to the Red Cross because I'm too far away to help. I have also designated my contribution specifically for hurricane relief. Don't think for a moment, though, that I haven't taken people into my home in times of need.  There is always room at the table in my three room cabin.


I am not an American citizen. I have no right to tell you what your government should do. I am just bewildered that you're not incensed by the neglect that compounded this disaster.

Adele's picture

(post #44013, reply #29 of 115)

You mentioned you weren't citizen, so where are you from?  Your profile isn't filled out.


I am not commenting on your other comments, as I am sure they were emotional.


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

Gretchen's picture

(post #44013, reply #31 of 115)

I don't think anyone anywhere could possibly have foreseen that this devastation could happen. It was a freak storm that started as a tropical depression and then grew to the monster it was.  The dikes were designed for a category 3 storm. The surge was more than any prediction coming from anywhere no matter our technology.
You are incensed that precautions weren't taken -- "neglect" in your words  .  Let's see, how far back do you want to lay that blame--it didn't just happen.  This  seems to be a red herring to me otherwise as Monday morning quarterbacking.  


One reason being given for the lack of services coming into NOLA right now is that they want and need for EVERYONE to leave. 


Gretchen


Edited 9/1/2005 10:53 am ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #44013, reply #38 of 115)

I don't think anyone anywhere could possibly have foreseen that this devastation could happen. It was a freak storm that started as a tropical depression and then grew to the monster it was.  The dikes were designed for a category 3 storm. The surge was more than any prediction coming from anywhere no matter our technology.


And it couldn't be more true that "Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition."

Gretchen's picture

(post #44013, reply #40 of 115)

I don't think I understand your metaphor.  Did you expect this to be this devastating?


Chand Greeson.  Thanks. I will look into that. Yes, we have given some to the Red Cross but this requires more.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #44013, reply #42 of 115)

Sorry. The quotation is from Monty Python and the point is that no one DID expect such devastation, nor could they have. I agree with you.

Gretchen's picture

(post #44013, reply #43 of 115)

It seemed so. Thanks.
Watching that thing go across the Gulf was horrible. I know some of these people just could not leave and my heart goes out to them. The lawlessness is so disturbing. I have often said, kiddingly sort of, but with a modicum of truth, New Orleans has always seemed to be just a bit on the edge.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Fledge's picture

(post #44013, reply #44 of 115)

but I cannot agree with any idiot who's trying to steal a 42" TV.


Well there ya go, ...................to plug in where?


The criminals saw an opportunity to profit from abandoned homes and business'.


Not until now, will they realize, their theft is in vain...they cannot take it with them, they cannot hoard these things.


 


 

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

Marcia's picture

(post #44013, reply #45 of 115)

I wanna know why they're going around with guns shooting at the rescuers. What's the point? Mob rule, I guess. My heart breaks for so many, darlin'.

KarenP's picture

(post #44013, reply #58 of 115)

I wanna know why they're going around with guns shooting at the rescuers. What's the point? Mob rule, I guess. My heart breaks for so many, darlin'.


  They want to hijack the fueled transportation to leave was the speculation on the news last night.  Buses, boats, helicoptors...I did wonder though how someone thought they could just hop in one of those and drive off.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #44013, reply #41 of 115)

Not to hijack an important thread, but until now I thought you were a gentleman....

:-)

Nice to meet another CT lady!

CHandGreeson's picture

(post #44013, reply #46 of 115)

ROTFLMAO!!!

How funny! I wanted to be Charlotte, but that was already taken :) I'll start signing my name from now on!

Jean's picture

(post #44013, reply #47 of 115)

LOL.  I keep reading it as CoolHandGreeson.

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
TracyK's picture

(post #44013, reply #24 of 115)

There's no reason to be a ****** to people who are trying to figure out a way to help.

Squirrels are just rats in cuter outfits.
       -- Carrie Bradshaw

ranga's picture

(post #44013, reply #28 of 115)

I stand corrected.

Jillsifer's picture

(post #44013, reply #33 of 115)

If it seems too much then maybe you ought to address your own priorities.


Great idea. My number-one priority is not listening to self-righteous lectures from people who want to politicize something that was meant as an attempt to solicit ideas for HELPING, rather than sermonizing.


Peddle your anger somewhere else, because I'll have no part of it.



 


 


Edited 9/1/2005 12:54 pm ET by jillsifer

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #44013, reply #5 of 115)

This morning, our Citgo station was $2.79 a gallon. By 1:30 this afternoon, it was $2.99. I think that's price gouging.


But as far as helping out, I would like to as well.
I'd be happy to go and volunteer, but can't leave DH and the kids.
But I will gladly, gratefully, donate $$$.


~RuthAnn


New House Rule:
No juggling anything smaller than a watermelon.

~RuthAnn

AnnL's picture

(post #44013, reply #6 of 115)

I'm grateful I have a house and a job, which so many down there don't.  I'll donate what I can and support what businesses we can.


AnnL
Transitions Farm
Gardening, cooking, and riding
in Central Mass.

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

PeterDurand's picture

(post #44013, reply #7 of 115)

You think THATS gouging. I bought a tankfull in Blaine WA this morning and paid $2.96US per US gal. That works out to $0.93CDN per L. based on an 80 cent dollar. Up here the prices are hovering at $1.20 cdn/L.

(pi**ed off at taxes)Peter


Edited 8/31/2005 7:48 pm ET by PeterDurand

Nihon's picture

(post #44013, reply #8 of 115)

Nah, $0.20 doesn't count as gouging.  Heck, I was able to get that much off of my gas just by getting it from the Marathon station in the Wal-Mart parking lot rather than the gas stations out by the interstate.  I heard it's probably going to be up above $4 here pretty soon, assuming we can get it at all.  Time for all of us to start shopping around for gas, I guess.

AJ12754's picture

(post #44013, reply #111 of 115)

There was a gas station in Centreville, VA that was charging $5.89 per gallon while gas in Richmond was about $3.09.


When the dust settles, someone is gonna come after them for gouging because Virginia laws are pretty clear on THAT subject.

Cave obdurationem cordis

Gretchen's picture

(post #44013, reply #112 of 115)

Well, a byproduct of helping can be cleaning house. I am going through my linen closet to get sheets and towels to donate for evacuees who are heading to apartments.  Not before I needed to, of course.  Have found things I didn't even know I still had.  And a lot of table linens I have been wondering about.


Gretchen


Edited 9/7/2005 12:40 pm ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
MadMom's picture

(post #44013, reply #113 of 115)

ITA - those of us who have way too much can certainly help ourselves while helping those who have nothing.  This gave me a great excuse to take four bags of summer clothes from my closet and donate them.  If they had been taking winter clothing, there would have been a lot more.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Aberwacky's picture

(post #44013, reply #114 of 115)

As Gretchen noted, they'll need winter clothing before too much longer, even in Texas.


There are an estimated 100,000 evacuees from Lousiana and Mississippi in Arkansas, mostly individuals and families that escaped on their own and put up by private groups and smaller communities.  The relief effort is a very local one here, as many churches are housing/hosting several families. 


I dropped off stuffed animals, some of the boys' old clothes and some school supplies at the elementary school down the street yesterday for some of the evacuated children now attending there.


It's nice to be able to help on a personal level. 


Leigh


 


the difference in being involved and committed: chickens are involved in breakfast; pigs are committed...

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy