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Camping advice?

msm-s's picture

Am packing for a 3 day Cub Scout camping trip. this will be our first one away form civilization in a real campground.

Rain is predicted for the entire trip :-(
we have a good tent, tarp, etc, but I'd like to get any tips y'all may have for camping.
BTW, I have printed out a thorough checklist for packing. Looking to any experts here for any advice you can offer-
Thanks

Glenys's picture

(post #52355, reply #1 of 56)

Choose a spa to check into and make a reservation for the moment you return.

msm-s's picture

(post #52355, reply #2 of 56)

LOL!

Jillsifer's picture

(post #52355, reply #3 of 56)

I, being of sound mind, proudly declare that I am NO expert on camping. But I've survived more Cub Scout events than I care to remember, and I can assure you that once he "bridges" over into Boy Scouts, your life will get immeasurably better. And quieter.


Bring extras of everything except boys. Even in these days of helicopter parenting, somebody won't have a critical part of his ten essentials (toilet paper), somebody else will have forgotten spare socks (and it WILL be the kid who falls into the river), another Cub won't have a jacket.


Coffee. Whether you're a full-time coffee drinker or not, you'll need it. (If you're LDS, find another stimulant because you won't sleep.) Bug junk--definitely bring extra bug junk. Brush up on your ghost stories. Nothing silences them like ghost stories, particularly with a local angle. (Did you know the Campfire Ghost lives RIGHT OVER THERE and only comes out at night?)


Have a thank-God-we're-home plan to restore your sanity. Bubble bath, "chick" magazine, a friend on speed dial . . . do whatever it takes to reacclimate yourself to a proper life, because camping with the Cub Scouts combines the charm of a tractor pull with the serenity of a high-wire act.


Someday you'll look back fondly on all of this, but in the meantime, the best of luck.



 


 


Ask your child what he wants for dinner only if he's buying.


Edited 5/7/2009 1:39 pm by Jillsifer

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

msm-s's picture

(post #52355, reply #4 of 56)

OMG- you and Glenys are making me laugh so hard! BTW, since I'm "stealing" DS from his dad as per our custody schedule for Fri night and Saturday all day, dad agreed to take DS in for the night when we get back on Sunday afternoon. Spa is not in the budget, but I'll have had my Mother's Day camping extravaganza (I'm one of only a very few moms on this trip) and will definitely be ready for a bubble bath, for sure. Thanks for the idea!

BTW- I am most worried about the effect of prolonged moisture on our bodies. What would the best preventative barrier/treatment be? Powders, ointments?

Jillsifer's picture

(post #52355, reply #5 of 56)

BTW- I am most worried about the effect of prolonged moisture on our bodies. What would the best preventative barrier/treatment be? Powders, ointments?


Seriously--listen to whatever your local Council recommends. Those guys, particularly the "real" employees in the Council office, are really well-trained for Mother Nature's particular forms of sadism in your locale. I have a feeling someone will suggest a plastic-type barrier of some sort. I assume your ten-essentials list includes "cheap, plastic poncho"? Definitely do that one. Maybe bring some extra plastic for your tent openings if the rain continues.


And really? It's JUST rain. It'll make you uncomfortable, and if you have any sense at all, slightly snarky. But it shouldn't do anything really horrible.


I know what it's like to be one of the few moms on a Scout campout. The bad news is that you can feel a bit isolated when the Y-chromosomers start beating their chests and roaring. The good news is that, at least based on my experience, Scouters tend to embrace old-fashioned/traditional views. Translated, that means you won't get stuck carrying too much heavy stuff or have to struggle too hard with willful tent stakes, etc.


 


 


Ask your child what he wants for dinner only if he's buying.

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

msm-s's picture

(post #52355, reply #7 of 56)

Yes, we have the under-tent tarp and a spare, etc., and the CRV will sleep us in the event there is flash-flood type conditions. I'm worried because I have a tendency to get uncomfortable rashes when caught in moist clothes too long (unexpected rain on long, hot bike excursions, etc). I'm now thinking that a preventative slathering of plain old diaper rash ointment would be a good idea.

Food - we're all sharing. I've emailed the group what I'll be bringing, and I intend to learn from the others what the best cooking utensils will be for future trips when we aren't in such a big group where there's bound to be everything we need.
Yeah, Gretchen- I've always frozen our drinks (after pouring enough out to keep containers from popping) and used them as ice when the ex and I drove from his mom's beach house with the fresh shrimp in the cooler. will do so this trip, although I'm going to take powdered milk instead. I experimented with it in my coffee this week, and it will do well enough for a campout, and is much lighter to carry.

I'm wanting to bring an activity, and am thinking that if i go get a bag of plaster of paris and something to mix it in we can make casts of any tracks the boys find.


Edited 5/7/2009 2:18 pm ET by msm-s

Gretchen's picture

(post #52355, reply #8 of 56)

Have you tried coffee creamer instead of dried milk?

Gretchen

Gretchen
msm-s's picture

(post #52355, reply #9 of 56)

naturally :-). But here's what is listed on the box of powdered milk:
Non-fat dry milk, Vitamin A, Vitamin D3.
Period.

Since no creamer in the house, here's what wikipedia posted about powdered creamers:
"The principal ingredients in all of these nondairy creamers are sugars and vegetable oils. The three brands contain partially hydrogenated oils loaded with trans fats. The Coffee-mate label indicates the oil could be any of the following: coconut, palm kernel, soybean, cottonseed, or safflower. The sugars are a combination of corn syrup, maltodextrin, and sugar.
All three brands contain sodium caseinate. The sodium caseinate's purpose is to provide a hint of dairy flavor as well as to create a thickening and whitening for a creamy look and feel. Sodium caseinate is obtained from fresh and pasteurized skim milk by acid coagulation of the casein, neutralization with sodium hydroxide, and drying in a spray dryer.
Common among the nondairy creamers is dipotassium phosphate (a powder used to moderate coffee acidity), mono and diglycerides (to prevent oil separation), and natural and artificial flavors and colors."

I could go look for a vegan creamer at the health food store, or i could just use the powdered milk i already have on hand for use in baking when I'm low on milk.

Also, the powdered milk will do for DS's cereal in the morning and other purposes that rehydrated creamer doesn't work for. I know that people generally hate powdered milk, but it's really fine for coffee and cereal, in a pinch, and it's lightweight and doesn't need a cooler. when I was a kid in North Dakota, we drank lots of powdered milk because it wasn't always easy to get to the store.


Edited 5/7/2009 2:46 pm ET by msm-s

leonap's picture

(post #52355, reply #10 of 56)

Cornstarch is good to help with body moisture.

Here's a tip: when removing hot sausage from cast iron skillet over the campfire, do not put it on styrofoam plate. :-)

msm-s's picture

(post #52355, reply #14 of 56)

I'm laughing and wincing at the same time!
ps- reminds me of when i got my first hot glue gun. I was holding a large styrofoam ball in the palm of one hand and putting a dollop of glue on top. I realized the ball might melt a little, but had no idea the molten glue would shoot straight to the bottom and fuse to my flesh.
No styrofoam plates here, anyhow. Paper all the way!


Edited 5/7/2009 3:20 pm ET by msm-s

leonap's picture

(post #52355, reply #15 of 56)

OUCH!

DJHinAZ's picture

(post #52355, reply #19 of 56)

The problem with cornstarch is that it can mold over a few days.
I'd recommend Gold Bond powder--the body stuff (in the yellow container) and the foot powder (in the blue container).

Definitely bring something to do. Yahtzee is fun, and light.

And remember you're out having fun!

leonap's picture

(post #52355, reply #23 of 56)

Never had cornstarch to mold but then I've only ever kept it in my cabinets.

Gretchen's picture

(post #52355, reply #24 of 56)

Yes, I'd have to agree with you.  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
DJHinAZ's picture

(post #52355, reply #28 of 56)

My experience of molding cornstarch is only when it has been in contact with moisture, which is what the OP is definitely going to have.

I make a non-Newtonian fluid called oobleck (cornstarch and water) as a demo for kids, and it's really cool stuff, but don't leave it out for more than a day or two... it grows nice fuzzy black things.

I wouldn't want cornstarch on my body if I couldn't wash it off after a day... I prefer Gold Bond powder myself, thanks.

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #52355, reply #16 of 56)

you could also pick up a couple tetra packs of milk and they wouldn't require refrigeration until opened.

~RuthAnn


~RuthAnn

msm-s's picture

(post #52355, reply #17 of 56)

not familiar with that term; are they at all groceries or just health food stores? Thanks-

sanderson's picture

(post #52355, reply #18 of 56)

One of my kids' favorite camping foods...pudgy pies.

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msm-s's picture

(post #52355, reply #34 of 56)

sorry- the picture is so tiny, i couldn't tell what it was... looks like maybe an immersion heating element? What's a pudgy pie? thanks-

msm-s's picture

(post #52355, reply #36 of 56)

ah- it's a pie iron! googled pudgy pies and found that it's practically a generic term for anything cooked in a pie iron.
Any recipes to share?

sanderson's picture

(post #52355, reply #46 of 56)

Even picky kids eat better if they cook it themselves. But since you asked, my fave is raisin bread, buttered with good peanut butter and banana slices. Our family fledged two eagles and one life scout...lot's of camp cooking. As I remember though the cubs are just getting going, so keep it fun. Soup's fun, biscuit dough on a stick.

Gretchen's picture

(post #52355, reply #47 of 56)

Oh, yeah. Biscuit on a stick!!


Our kids loved making pancakes by drawing on the griddle with the batter.


Gretchen
Gretchen
MadMom's picture

(post #52355, reply #48 of 56)

We used to have a lot of recipes which were fun, simple, and easy to make when we spent a lot of time on the boat.  Several of them were old recipes from scouting days, such as "campfire stew" (which had, IIRC, ground beef and lots of veggies, all mixed together and cooked in a big pot.)



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Gretchen's picture

(post #52355, reply #49 of 56)

We did a lot of Dutch oven cooking. Good stuff. Build the fire after breakfast, put the stuff in the pot and let it cook all day in the coals. Also cobblers and cakes in the Dutch oven, after picking wild blueberries!!  We camped a lot every summer.

Gretchen

Gretchen
msm-s's picture

(post #52355, reply #50 of 56)

dough on a stick! simple and fun- what a concept!
I can imagine that would be fun to customize, with cinnamon sugar or sesame seeds or sea salt etc.
Can you please post a few details? I can imagine it being burnt on the outside and still raw on the inside. Our cubs are still at that picky stage.

msm-s's picture

(post #52355, reply #51 of 56)

BTW- We had great fun! It rained almost the whole time (including a steady torrent during camp tear-down on sunday, grrrr) and there here was an astounding lightening storm right in the area the first night between 11pm and 3am . DS, who has always been somewhat scared of thunder and lightening rode it out fairly calmly in the tent with me and I THINK he's cured, fingers crossed. The rain stopped long enough the next day for the boys to spend hours sliding down a mud "waterfall" off of a lake- am dying to post photos, but I missed the boat getting the Creative Suite for the Mac from that poster who offered it a few months ago when I had my computer rebuilt, and I can't get photos to upload from my camera any more.

Got to go continue hosing everything down (it was pouring rain when we were home unpacking as well!)
We survived, the boys had fun, and the group is planning to go camping again over the summer and early fall.
Thanks for all the advice! Am always happy to get more camping tips and recipes. Any advice particular to summer camping?

Gretchen's picture

(post #52355, reply #52 of 56)

I'm sure I don't have to tell you but be sure your tent and tarps, etc. are thoroughly dry before storing them. Mildew is impossible to get rid of in tent cloth. Ask me how I know.


Summer camping. No different from other times. Take bug spray. I have recently heard that Listerine in a spray bottle is good for mosquitoes!! Gonna give that bad boy a try for sure. I cannot sit on our patio with any comfort in the summer.


Gretchen
Gretchen
sanderson's picture

(post #52355, reply #56 of 56)

Good basic learning...neither raw nor burned is lethal. Kind of like marshmallows but a little softer on the glycemic index. For my kids stick cooking helped dutch oven cooking make sense as in getting it hot but not blazing. They learned about coals for cooking rather than flames.

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #52355, reply #31 of 56)

it's just shelf stable milk - I think most grocery stores carry it near the powdered milk.
http://bordenshelfstablemilk.com/borden/borden_PL_w32.htm

~RuthAnn


~RuthAnn

Gretchen's picture

(post #52355, reply #32 of 56)

I keep some in my pantry for people who need "cream" since we drink skim milk.

Gretchen

Gretchen