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Another day at the office

Adele's picture

Knew something was up when the President of the company arrived, unannounced, along with the head of HR first thing this morning.  Of course, my stomach started doing flips and twists. 


Well, they got rid of Bill, who was IT recruiter.  He was last hired and he joked about how he's lasted so long. 


The kicker was Mike.  Branch manager, his dad was one of the owners from the orignial company.  He has been with the company in one capacity or another since high school (helped w/filing & such during summers).  I am just sick.   It was a horrible, horrible thing.  They actually stayed in his office while he packed his boxes up. 


The surprising thing is that I am still here, thought for sure I would be let go as it is so slow.  Sort of in a little way WANTED it to be me- I think I am having a mid-life crisis and want a change of some sorts.  This would of been a change.  35 minutes til I can go home.  Longest day ever and I am exhausted.


 


 


Warm Thoughts From FLA

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

akaCamiA's picture

(post #39766, reply #1 of 41)

Oh, Adele...how horrible.

The only good thing I can say is that by the time this is finally posted to the board, it will be quitting time!

up-north attitude...

pssttt...wanna buy a house?
xMikeSmith's picture

(post #39766, reply #2 of 41)

cami.. what bridge is that ?  i can't enlarge the pic enuf to figure it out ?

Mike Smith


Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Mike Smith   Rhode Island : Design / Build / Repair / Restore

Jean's picture

(post #39766, reply #3 of 41)

That's Michigan's Big Mac.  It spans the two penninsulas of the state.  A beautiful thing.!! I  can remember waiting in line to board a car ferry to take us across. Sometimes you   could wait 1/2 day if the traffic was bad. Now you're across in a few minutes. Cami lives/works within sight of it. Gotta get up there this summer, Cami. :)


 


Am I ambivalent?  Well, yes and no.

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
akaCamiA's picture

(post #39766, reply #6 of 41)

Mike, Jean's nailed the info about the bridge, of course.

Jean, we should get together- Michigan's verymini-fest.

Adele, did you get to have a drink yet?


...up-north attitude...

pssttt...wanna buy a house?
Jean's picture

(post #39766, reply #7 of 41)

We'll be  up that way sometime this spring or summer for sure...I'll email you first.

 


Am I ambivalent?  Well, yes and no.

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
akaCamiA's picture

(post #39766, reply #8 of 41)

Good! Something to look forward to...


...up-north attitude...

pssttt...wanna buy a house?
shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #39766, reply #4 of 41)

Hi Adele, I completely sympathize! We had the first round of layoffs last week, and it was very strange - everybody was teary-eyed at first, then began to think, "what the %$#%! At least they get to go home, with a healthy severance package to boot!" the rest of us get to stick around for another two months. (We're all getting laid off eventually...even the HR folks.) Ah well - at least our HR dept. is being very, very decent - have even offered to pay for taxi home if anyone needs it after being laid off.

dixieleigh's picture

(post #39766, reply #5 of 41)

"They actually stayed in his office while he packed his boxes up. "


You ain't seen nothing until FedEx fires you - happened to my younger daughter about 12 years ago (she was 18 years old at the time)  and the security guards actually were waiting for her outside the building after lunch and accompanied her back to her desk and "escorted her out of the building", surrounding her like she was a criminal of some sort. Her boss had called security because she knew daughter was going to resign.  Daughter was trying to bid back into the flight part of FedEx which she loved but her boss wouldn't let her go, AND put on her file "No Re-hire".  You can imagine how devastated an 18 year old with a good future with FedEx could be at the time. Upside, boss got demoted to clerical position in the same department that she headed after this fiasco.


 


 

 

 

NihonNoCook's picture

(post #39766, reply #9 of 41)

Dixie - well, I can't top the "No Re-Hire" file, but I can top the escort service.  Last time my previous employer had layoffs, everyone knew in advance because the idiots in HR reserved the most remote conference room for the entire day, on the shared-folders reservation chart that everyone has access to.  Then on the appointed day, if it was you being fired, your boss called you to his office, then walked you out to the conference room, through a courtyard that is bordered on all four sides by offices with big windows, and a lunchroom/breakroom with even bigger windows.  After reviewing your severance package, security guards then escorted you to your locker, where you were allowed to remove only items they considered personal, and then took you out to your car, and escorted you off the property.  Anything in your office, desk, etc. had to be sent to you later by your boss.  I have never seen so many ulcerous people afraid to answer phones in my life.  Every hour or so there would be a flurry of e-mails from someone with a courtyard view, listing who the next victim was.  It was pitiful.


Luckily, I wasn't one of the unlucky, but I knew enough of them to know this was the deal.  Ick.


Business Travel Goddess
Jean's picture

(post #39766, reply #10 of 41)

I think the escort service is pretty much  standard operating procedure for any large company.  It's a not very nice preventive measure to forstall any kind of retaliatory  gesture on the part of the former employee.

 


Am I ambivalent?  Well, yes and no.

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Tuck's picture

(post #39766, reply #11 of 41)

doesn't really matter what their reasons are It Stinks 


On another matter, how do you change the size of the letters - mine only goes to 7, the size you are seeing now?


 



~tuck The CT'er formerly known as cam14
If you can't be kind, at least have the decency to be vague


Edited 3/26/2002 10:57:24 PM ET by tuck

CaroleG4's picture

(post #39766, reply #20 of 41)

Hey, Nihon.........Our former esteemed mayor(in charge of the public school system) did the same uncouth thing to employees unlucky enough to work downtown on good ol' E.6th.......


Good friend of mine(math resource teacher) was let go, escorted to her office by police officers(you know how they loved ol' Mikey) told to clean out her desk and escorted out.........


Adele.......hope it never happens to you.......

Off to Tucson, got my groove on, in the shadow of the Rincon...
Tuck's picture

(post #39766, reply #13 of 41)

Ah dixie, that's an awful situation for an 18 year old to have to handle.


~tuck The CT'er formerly known as cam14
If you can't be kind, at least have the decency to be vague

kai230's picture

(post #39766, reply #15 of 41)

Brutal methods for brutal times when the greedy, corrupt CEOs and their cronies must do whatever to keep their golden parachutes and billion dollar salaries/perks.


Escorting has been around in hi-tech for a long time--they must have had too many doing a "format c:" or whatever that DOS command is. I also think some postal experiences helped bring it into common practice. It's not far-fetched to think that a suicide bomber could strike here again.


It's a good idea (dixie, I'm not taking my advice either) to have some record at home of what types of personal items you have at work--date, item, purpose, value. I also let my boss know of my books/price, even though they are embossed (anyone could tear out that page).


Adele, I've been lucky enough to see mostly useless folks get laid off, but plenty remain. The person you mentioned was probably a "liability" $-wise--there is a huge amt of age discrimination out there, but they can fabricate anything and use that as a cover. Brutal.

Tuck's picture

(post #39766, reply #12 of 41)

I'll bet you were exhausted, I'm glad you weren't one of the unlucky ones.  Sounds like it time to start job hunting.


~tuck The CT'er formerly known as cam14
If you can't be kind, at least have the decency to be vague

madnoodle's picture

(post #39766, reply #14 of 41)

Sounds crappy, Adele.  (Gee, I wonder if the censors will nuke cra$$y?)  My little sis just got "terminated" in much the same way.  She was told she had five minutes to clean out her desk and then be escorted out of the building, by her former office-mate, who refused to look her in the eye, or even say goodbye.  And this was at a small, friendly (or so she thought . . .) firm.  Yuk.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Jean's picture

(post #39766, reply #16 of 41)

It's not a nice thing to have happen, but sadly it's necessary to prevent sabotage and outright theft.  Remember the mess the dems left when they vacated their offices? Too bad they didn't have an escort.

 


Am I ambivalent?  Well, yes and no.

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
mulch52's picture

(post #39766, reply #36 of 41)

Jean, FWIW, the General Services Administration's finding on the alleged office trashing by departing White House Democrats was...just that, alleged.  All they cited  was normal wear and tear.  I understand the Bush Administration spokespeople recanted that particular accusation, which sounds to me like a product of the Matt Drudge School of Alleged Journalism.


In many industries/enterprises, it shouldn't be surprising that security personnel are present to witness desk cleaning-out and escort off-premises.  Certainly in businesses and agencies connected to national security, defense hardware (and associated high-tech intellectual property which legitimately belongs to the employer), not being escorted/watched during exit would strike me as strange. 


This may surprise you, but during the reductions-in-force that have affected me directly (I work for Dept of Defense, used to work for the Missouri Employment Service), the attitude of management  was (with one exception) as supportive and kind as could be.  I've been very lucky on that score.  There just isn't any excuse, IMO, for the kinds of shoddy management behavior cited in this thread.   

kai230's picture

(post #39766, reply #17 of 41)

She was told she had five minutes to clean out her desk and then be escorted out of the building, by her former office-mate, who refused to look her in the eye, or even say goodbye.  And this was at a small, friendly (or so she thought . . .) firm.  Yuk.


I think part of the problem is that it is done like a surprise attack. Also, all employees feel vulnerable--as if eye contact would also get them the ax. And dollars to donuts this was not indicated in any policy manual.

KarenP's picture

(post #39766, reply #18 of 41)

sorry Adele..I remember the day that my former company was purchased...same kind of thing..all of the sudden 100 of your friends walked out the door without a goodbye and those of us remaining were called up to give one up for the gipper to save what was left. Having been on that side of the desk, I told one of my newly exwork partners I wasn't sure whether it was worse to be in the group that left or those that remained.

Hang in there..peaceful thoughts are with you

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #39766, reply #19 of 41)

Awful.


My former company went thru a wild hiring phase - hiring everyone and their brother whether they had the skills for the job or not. Of course, that had to come to an end before the company went belly up, so they began mass layoffs - and always did it on Tuesdays or Thursdays. One especially bad one is still referred to as "Bloody Tuesday"


After Natalie was born I worked from home, part time. My department was gradually eliminated and I was clocking zero hours. Of course, the day they finally decided to can me was the same day Cassie was having surgery for that nasty tumor on her leg, and we weren't sure if she'd survive the surgery. I actually felt kinda bad for the HR VP who had to call me, of course they had no idea about Cassie being in the hospital.


Revenge is sweet however - I sold off all my company stock options 3 weeks later just as the price spiked to 15 - then plummeted and in the last year has had a high of 8 dollars and a low of 29 cents.


~RuthAnn
Always Smell It First.

~RuthAnn

BossHog's picture

(post #39766, reply #38 of 41)

Reading this thread I was surprised at how many have been through nasty layoff situations.

I've never been laid off, but did get canned last June. My boss found out I had interviewed with another company. So the next day when I showed up for work he fired me immediately. Then he stood there while I cleaned out my desk and looked over every little thing I put in the box to make sure it wasn't company property. So now I work for his biggest competitor. (Revenge is sweet)

I had only worked there 10 years (+/-)so I guess I shouldn't have expected any loyalty....



TracyK's picture

(post #39766, reply #39 of 41)

Company loyalty does not exist. Companies are out to save money, usually at the expense of employees. It might sound bitter but it's just a fact of life at this point.

Jean's picture

(post #39766, reply #40 of 41)

I used to think that company's loyalties were only to their stockholders.  Enron put the lie even to that belief. Company executives are only interested in their own fat wallets.


 


Am I ambivalent?  Well, yes and no.

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Tuck's picture

(post #39766, reply #41 of 41)

Well this was certainly interesting, my son's GF was laid off yesterday.  They were aware lay offs were coming and she was shocked it all happened so fast. She was called into the office in the morning, got the bad news then stayed and worked till her usual quitting time.


~tuck
If you can't be kind, at least have the decency to be vague


Edited 3/28/2002 12:14:56 PM ET by tuck

Wolvie's picture

(post #39766, reply #21 of 41)

Adele - I am so sorry for you. I know this is tearing you up . Be strong grrl! We are all here for you!

Woe to the cook whose sauce has no sting
- Chaucer

 

Zombiechef's picture

(post #39766, reply #22 of 41)

Re: Letting go the son of the original owner...Corporations have absolutely no memory and no conscience.  (I seem to remember another thing with the same credentials..)  There is no "loyalty" or "decency" factor involved in making these decisions.  It's for this reason I want to scream every time some corporate executive sacrifices his or her family relationship to be chained to a computer.  These people don't give a flying phuck whether you live or die.  They'll have you replaced before the body's cold.  I think people in whose life you do make a difference deserve better treatment.


Re: Watching him pack his boxes.  This is not uncommon.  At my old brokerage house, you were called into someone's office to get axed, then escorted back to your desk where, waiting for you was a box and a charge & ride slip.  I mean, after all, they're removing your source of income, the absolute least they can do is give you a free ride home with your box of chachkis and your coffee mug. 


In companies that deal with sensitive financial information, it's considered a security risk to leave a soon-to-be-disgruntled employee alone with his/her computer.  In some cases, after you've given 2 weeks' notice, they'll let you go the next day and pay you for the rest of the time you would have worked because (get this) your integrity has been compromised by your intention to leave the firm.  No one questions the integrity of big business when they indiscriminately "let people go" so Mr. Prez and his cronies can get the big buck bonuses.  I wish there was a way I could avoid jumping into this cesspool again but I have to after we move, for at least a little while.  If I can get in and out without an ulcer, I'll consider it a victory.

Adele's picture

(post #39766, reply #23 of 41)

Thank you all for your thoughts and words of wisdom.  It is totally weird coming in this morning with Mike gone.  The office is still reeling. 


The job market in Orlando totally #### right now and I do have the car payment and no other income.  No changes in the immediate future (well, maybe an extra dollar for the lottery- wouldn't that be sweet!).


Resume is updated and copied- I will actually peruse the Sunday employment instead of just throwing it on the floor.


Warm Thoughts From FLA

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

TracyK's picture

(post #39766, reply #25 of 41)

Oh, Adele... that totally s u c k s! I've been through the same thing myself... the company that took me down to Orlando last February (so I could meet you, LOL) laid off 17 out of 45 people last January (I made it to the second round). One poor guy who had come in late from a doctor's appt found he could not log on to his computer and was wandering around asking if the server was down as he couldn't sign in. People were so stunned they couldn't even tell him the news, plus there was such a hush-hush feeling about the place that nobody wanted to break it to him.


I got along so well with my boss at the time... I was lucky. Three months later, she told me on Monday that there would be more layoffs on Thursday, and that the rest of the marketing dept (ie, me)was on the block. So at least I had three days to look for a job and fax out my resume from company property!


The morning of the layoffs I sat in my office just waiting to get the axe for three hours. She called me in (and the b*tch HR lady was there too, they have to have an "observer" in case you go postal) and handed me a toy dart-gun, held up a target, and said "If you can hit the bullseye, you can keep your job!" and then proceeded to wave the target around in the air so there was no way I would hit it! I think the b*tch HR lady was shocked, but it kept both of us from crying, so it worked. Then she took me out for lunch, and I went to get my car inspected and headed home. Very surreal day.


It's going around though... my sweet SO just lost his job about a week ago... not only is he not getting any severance, the company does not have enough money to pay the employees for the last three weeks they worked! Crappy, crappy, crappy.


Sorry you have to go through this... if you need someone to read over your resume I'd be happy to help.

RheaS's picture

(post #39766, reply #26 of 41)

I just heard through the office grapevine that none of us should get too attached to our jobs and to prepare ourself to the possibility of being laid off in the next year. I work for the Illinois government, so everyone usually feels very secure about their jobs. However, Illinois is in financial trouble because of 9/11 and a weasel of a governor. Some agencies have already started laying off people and it's very sad because many of them have been with their agency for 20 or more years. They're calling it early retirement in some cases, but there aren't the huge severance/retirement packages of private companies. At the same time, the director of an education-related agency recently retired with his full retirement package, $250K/yr; then, he got hired back as a consultant while they find his replacement. As a consultant, his pay is $225K/yr or something like that; they couldn't pay him more than his retirement package. It's absolutely ridiculous. I'm just going to tie up all my loose ends here and head home to Vancouver.