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Angels and Demons Movie

Carole4's picture

Husband and I just got back from the movies, Angels and Demons. We both hated The DiVinci Code and Ron Howard and company has done a much better job with Angels and Demons. It is an action packed movie, pretty much follows the book, and it will offend a lot of people. But, IMO, that's what a movie should do, offend, lead to discussions. Not an Oscar movie, but a good thought provoking movie, IMO.

FL.Cook's picture

(post #52503, reply #1 of 51)

WE JUST GOT BACK FROM ANGLES AND DEMONS, AND I REALLY WAS NOT WILD ABOUT IT, BUT I DID ENJOY The DiVinci Code!!! DIFFERENT STROKES FOR DIFFERENT PEOPLE!!!Carole


Edited 6/5/2009 6:19 pm ET by FL.Cook

Carole
Carole4's picture

(post #52503, reply #2 of 51)

OK, you might want to take your caps lock off. I thought, and I read both books, that The DiVinci Code was more intellectual. Angels and Demons was written before the Code. I thought it laid out a whole lot of stuff that Brown talked about in the Code. Different movies, different takes on the books. Both books take into consideration fact and fiction. I know that a lot of people don't like Brown's books, but he uses both fact and fiction.

Anyway, a good way to spend a hot afternoon in Tucson.

MadMom's picture

(post #52503, reply #3 of 51)

I've read several of Brown's books, and feel that he only has one theme "middle aged man meets lovely young woman who helps him solve a mystery."  BOOORRRING!  Haven't seen any of the movies, even though I love Tom Hanks.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Carole4's picture

(post #52503, reply #4 of 51)

I did not like the Code at all, but Angels and Demons kept me interested. Hanks was much better, IMO, in this one than the first one. But, as I said, it was a good way to spend a hot afternoon in Tucson.

Lee's picture

(post #52503, reply #8 of 51)

I had the opposite experience.  I couldn't put Code down, but I had trouble staying with Angels to the end and skipped over parts of it.  I ordered Code from Netflix and we watched part of it.  I was bored after half an hour, DH stayed with it a while longer, but we both thought it was terrible.  Different strokes, right? 

Carole4's picture

(post #52503, reply #10 of 51)

Yes, different strokes. I read Angels and Demons first. If you like non-stop action and a real surprise ending, you might like the movie.

Lee's picture

(post #52503, reply #31 of 51)

I suspect it's too violent for my tender sensibilities.  ;0)

Carole4's picture

(post #52503, reply #32 of 51)

No, it's not! :)

TracyK's picture

(post #52503, reply #5 of 51)

Kind of like John Grisham's "daring young lawyer bucks the system" theme, or Danielle Steel's "woman meets the right man who dies in a tragic accident leaving her bereft and alone until she meets another man and emerges wiser and stronger" theme, or Jodi Picault's theme of "gut-wrenching emotional turmoil involving children, based on current events or common themes, with a spectacularly contrived 'surprise' ending." LOL. 


"One of the great strengths of the United States is … we do not consider ourselves a Christian nation or a Jewish nation or a Muslim nation. We consider ourselves a nation of citizens who are bound by ideals and a set of values."

                                                            --President Barack Obama

MadMom's picture

(post #52503, reply #33 of 51)

Yep.  I don't read Grisham or Picoult for exactly the same reason I stopped reading Brown.  Would be nice if authors used a new and different theme, but I guess if it works for them, it works, right?



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Regality's picture

(post #52503, reply #34 of 51)

I agree that Grisham can get a bit formulaic, but you might want to read this one, a true story:  http://www.amazon.com/Innocent-Man-Murder-Injustice-Small/dp/0385517238  I was so angry by the time I finished it I just wanted to clobber someone. 

Gretchen's picture

(post #52503, reply #35 of 51)

Yes, indeed. Just plain cruel and ignorant.

Gretchen

Gretchen
BonnieinHolland's picture

(post #52503, reply #36 of 51)

I agree with Stephen -- Dan Brown writes a good exciting story but not with all the facts straight.  You'd think he could get his researchers to be sure that everything is right.  In any case, I just saw Angels and Demons.  I hated DaVinci Code -  Ron Howard is not one of my favorite directors.  But thought that Angels and Demons was very good for a straight action film.  It kept moving, a little in the MTV generation mode but okay I expect that of major movies these days, and didn't vary in spirit too much from the book (in details it varied a lot, but that's also the way it goes in Hollywood).  A much better film than DaVinci Code, I thought.  cheers, Bonnie

Carole4's picture

(post #52503, reply #37 of 51)

I saw an interview with Dan Brown and he acknowledged this. Where fact and fiction overlap is one reason his books sell. Hard to tell one from the other and I think it encourages people to do some research on their own.

BonnieinHolland's picture

(post #52503, reply #44 of 51)

I don't mind an author taking the facts and wrapping some fiction around them.  No problem.  But Dan Brown couldn't even get directions in Paris right in the DaVinci Code - no excuse for that kind of stuff from my viewpoint.  Nor do I appreciate his less-than-stellar writing, as in putting sentences, paragraphs and stories together.  Having said that, like I said before, I completely enjoyed both books - just did not like the movie DaVinci Code while thoroughly enjoying the movie Angels and Demons.  I can't wait to see what Dan Brown does with the Free Masons in his next book!  cheers, Bonnie

Carole4's picture

(post #52503, reply #45 of 51)

Ah, I see. Someone who is familiar with Paris would catch that.

Gretchen's picture

(post #52503, reply #48 of 51)

Yes, there are some glaring errors about Paris which many pointed out at the time.
BUT when we went after the movie was out, our friend/guide took us on a DaVinci Code tour of the Louvre which was fun.  When I read the book I had really forgotten how massive the galleries are. We even went to the bathroom where he tossed the tracker thing onto the truck.  Fun, even if not authentic/factual.  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
Carole4's picture

(post #52503, reply #49 of 51)

In A&D the churches of Rome were photographed beautifully. Another city I would love to see.

Gretchen's picture

(post #52503, reply #50 of 51)

Really can't wait to see it.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Syrah's picture

(post #52503, reply #38 of 51)

I don't care so much about facts when reading fiction, but bad grammar and a lack of good descriptive writing leave me cold.

I finished the Da Vinci Code, and it took a good few months, only because it was a gift. I didn't care how it ended, I didn't care for the characters, it was all a little 2-D for me.

Oh, and before anyone says it was a best seller - what is wrong with you? - I'll remind you that a lot of people would say the same thing about Kraft mac and cheese and all the cream of soup recipes.

In fact, I was thinking about another book I had issues with. I only got halfway through the Historian before I gave up and now I can't remember why. Should I try reading it again?

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained."
-Marie Curie
My perseverance will be rewarded.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Carole4's picture

(post #52503, reply #39 of 51)

Only if you want to.

Gretchen's picture

(post #52503, reply #40 of 51)

There's no reason for ANYone to like or not like something. If it took you months to read it, fine. I couldn't put it down. Fine.  It was a best seller. Fine.  Whatever


 What is it with everyone needing to say it was or wasn't good.
I didn't particularly care for Finnegan's Wake.   ;o)


Gretchen
Gretchen
Syrah's picture

(post #52503, reply #41 of 51)

Oh dear Gretchen... I was commenting on the fact that someone had a problem with the lack of factual facts. It's certainly not a slight on those who do enjoy it.

We certainly do not have to agree on everything. As for saying that it was or wasn't good.. I kind of thought that was the point. Aren't we all here sharing ideas/opinions? I didn't realise I was only permitted to talk about things that I like.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained."
-Marie Curie
My perseverance will be rewarded.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Gretchen's picture

(post #52503, reply #42 of 51)

Oh, c'mon. Sorry I misunderstood your point. No,dear, we can keep on discussing, as you want.


AND this is what I was answering--not grammar or research..


Oh, and before anyone says it was a best seller - what is wrong with you? - I'll remind you that a lot of people would say the same thing about Kraft mac and cheese and all the cream of soup recipes.


 


Gretchen


Edited 6/6/2009 10:01 pm ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
Syrah's picture

(post #52503, reply #43 of 51)

Well.. I'm sorry to have misunderstood you. I was adding that as caveat since it seems to be what is shouted at me if I dare to say I didn't enjoy the code.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained."
-Marie Curie
My perseverance will be rewarded.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

StevenHB's picture

(post #52503, reply #46 of 51)

I don't care so much about facts when reading fiction


It's not the "factuality" it's the complete implausibility of the description of the fiction part of the science fiction.  Good science fiction requires a one-time suspension of disbelief after which everything else follows logically.  In Brown's writing, the logic doesn't follow.



Maybe we'll find direction, around some corner, where it's been waiting to meet us.


Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible

Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible
Syrah's picture

(post #52503, reply #51 of 51)

I see. I can't recall if that frustrated me or not, it may have stopped me getting pulled in as I so enjoy in a novel.

Wonka, you were saved some tedium. ;-) Wish I had a friend like that.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained."
-Marie Curie
My perseverance will be rewarded.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

wonka's picture

(post #52503, reply #47 of 51)

I've never read any of Dan Brown's books. I have a friend, who has very similar tastes in books as me, who said not to bother. I figured that if she didn't like it, I probably won't either.

I don't always like best sellers. Anita Diamonts, The Red Tent, is one of them. I hated that book. I loved the idea of it, but the boring use of language in the book, left me cold. I felt it was alot of, and then this happened, and then this happened, etc.. until I wanted to scream. I won't read anymore of her books.

StevenHB's picture

(post #52503, reply #9 of 51)

I've read most of Dan Brown's novels.  While they tend to absorb me, much of his writing strikes me as science ficiton written by an English major who doesn't know enough about the science part of his writing. This is particularly true of Digital Fortress; though, I've felt that about his other work as well.


Maybe we'll find direction, around some corner, where it's been waiting to meet us.


Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible

Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible
Carole4's picture

(post #52503, reply #11 of 51)

I haven't read Digital Fortress, but I might try it. I would agree that Dan Brown brings a certain "formula" aspect to his writings.