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Variations on NY Times No Knead Bread

shywoodlandcreature's picture

I've had excellent results with smoked tomatoes and rosemary, adding the tomatoes when I first make the sponge. I think others have had similar results with a variety of additions.





"It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen."
George Orwell, 1984

Gretchen's picture

(post #66022, reply #1 of 153)

Sure. Go ahead and do it and report back!!  There are two threads going that have a lot of additions and ideas. On another board someone added cheese and said it was really good. I may have to start some for our party tomorrow.

Gretchen

Gretchen
stilllearning2's picture

(post #66022, reply #2 of 153)

I just made a great loaf using the NYTimes recipe. I used two cups King Arthur bread flour and one cup stone ground whole wheat. After the first 18 hour rise I added about one and a half cups of lightly toasted walnuts (toasted and cooled) and about a cup of chopped very moist wonderful dried figs that I bought for holiday baking.

The results? WOW! As a native New Yorker,I think I know a thing or two about bread, and this crusty loaf is terrific! Eli Zabar, watch out!

peabee's picture

(post #66022, reply #3 of 153)

I made one with olives, fresh oregano and parmesan cheese. It was excellent. I put the ingredients in right from the start. I have also done lots with various flours, mostly using 2/3 AP and then whatever flour you choose. I have also done a rye and caraway seed one. It was delish! I have done using beer instead of water, also very good.


As you can read in any of the various threads that are written about this bread, there is almost NO wrong way to do it. This recipe is very forgiving...any way when you figure out he cost per loaf, it really does not matter what you try, the cost out of pocket and labour is minimal.


All you really have to to remember is that you need about 24 hours to make, bake and eat. :)

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #66022, reply #4 of 153)

DH has been increasing the ingredients by 50% and achieving a much more impressive boule.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #66022, reply #5 of 153)

Funny you mentioned that - I am making this bread for tonight and ALMOST doubled the ingredients, but being the baking wimp I am.... I did not

next time, next year :-)

 


 


"Sally who? Sally in the corner"
(Amy, November 2006)

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #66022, reply #6 of 153)

Doubling the ingredients might be too much. DH adds an additional 1 1/2 cups of flour (bread flour). It makes a more substantial loaf.

Edited to say that all ingredients are increased by 50%. He only bakes the bread for a few minutes longer.


Edited 1/4/2007 9:05 am by favorablyimpressed

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Gretchen's picture

(post #66022, reply #7 of 153)

VERY nice. I'll be trying that!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
schnitzel's picture

(post #66022, reply #8 of 153)

That's a beauty!


shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #66022, reply #9 of 153)

Did he also increase the water?





"It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen."
George Orwell, 1984

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #66022, reply #10 of 153)

<Did he also increase the water?>

Yes. All ingredients were increased by 50%. Even the yeast.

Gretchen's picture

(post #66022, reply #11 of 153)

Ahhh. The dawn!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #66022, reply #12 of 153)

Thanks. That makes sense now.





"It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen."
George Orwell, 1984

Honeydew's picture

(post #66022, reply #13 of 153)

Increasing by 50% as soon as I send this.  Was the baking time also increased?  I need to know within 18 hrs!!!

Mom always said, "If you're gonna ask a man to dinner, make him bring the booze!"

Mom always said, "If you're gonna ask a man to dinner, make him bring the booze!"

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #66022, reply #14 of 153)

Just by a few minutes. Ovens differ. Use a thermometer. DH usually uses 210º.

cookie1's picture

(post #66022, reply #15 of 153)

Do all other ingredients amounts remain the same?

Cheryl


It is nice to be important, but it is more important to be nice!

Cheryl

It is nice to be important, but it is more important to be nice!

favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #66022, reply #18 of 153)

<Do all other ingredients amounts remain the same?.

All the ingredients are increased by 50%.

cookie1's picture

(post #66022, reply #23 of 153)

I didn't read the full thread before I typed the question. Thank you.

Cheryl


It is nice to be important, but it is more important to be nice!

Cheryl

It is nice to be important, but it is more important to be nice!

moptop's picture

(post #66022, reply #16 of 153)

I gave this recipe a try last weekend but must have done something wrong as my dough came out very loose - as if I had added too much water. Is it supposed to be a 'flowing' dough (for lack of a better term)? I thought I had messed it up beyond repair and opted to just throw it in the trash (kneading in additional flour didn't seem to help - not to mention it was contrary to the nature of the the recipe)

Heather's picture

(post #66022, reply #17 of 153)

I've made this bread several times. Yesterday's version was the wettest, loosest of all. I just went with it--it spread too much, but it was still delicious.

moptop's picture

(post #66022, reply #19 of 153)

Alrighty then - I'm giving it another go. Might give it a start during the lunch hour. It's such an enticing recipe being so simple and relatively hands off!

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #66022, reply #20 of 153)

I've actually been adding a bit more water just to get that "flow" -- in my experience, yes, the dough is almost batter-like, and yes, after shaping it (very loosely!)and letting it rise for the second time, I just pour it into the very hot pot. So far I've been thrilled with the results. Given what's involved, you can't go too far wrong with just about any approach.





"It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen."
George Orwell, 1984

Gretchen's picture

(post #66022, reply #34 of 153)

Guys, if the bread is too "liquid" add some more flour.


At the beach I PROVED it can be done ANYwhere.  Mixed the ingredients to show my friends how to do it.
Turned it onto the counter and probably added a quarter cup of flour. Let it rise. Since I had LITTLE sources at the beach I used a cast iron skillet for the base and a tin springform pan for the top. Turned the dough into the skillet and put the pan over. It was beautiful, delicious and everyone LOVED it.


 


Gretchen
Gretchen
moptop's picture

(post #66022, reply #36 of 153)

The beach? I am most impressed!

Gretchen's picture

(post #66022, reply #37 of 153)

Oh, yes. Rainy this week but still nice!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
Syb's picture

(post #66022, reply #21 of 153)

Is it supposed to be a 'flowing' dough


The dough is supposed to be flowing.  If you follow the recipe, it will definitely be loose.  The last few times I've made the dough, I've made it less loose, but still very sticky and shaggy.  As it sits for 18 hours, it miraculously gets looser, spreading out flat in the bowl.  But when it come to shaping and baking, it's easier to handle, and ends up a nice, high loaf. 


I've been increasing the recipe to four cups flour, or a bit more, since I first started making this bread.  Last night DD and family were here, and my impressive loaf fed five big eaters and one three-year-old.

moptop's picture

(post #66022, reply #22 of 153)

Y'know... I'm feeling awfully silly now for throwing my first attempt away! Sounds like I was actually on the right track! HAHA! How funny!

Syb's picture

(post #66022, reply #24 of 153)

Please do give it another try. 


I may have misled you and others when I said I increased the flour to four cups.  I didn't mean I only increased the flour to get a stiffer dough.  I increased the whole recipe proportionally, but using the agreed upon 1 1/2 C. water for the original recipe instead of 1 5/8. 


So I generally increase the recipe by 1/3:
2 C. water, 4 C. plus a little more flour for a little stiffer dough, 3/8 t. yeast, and about a tablespoon of salt.


After having problems with the resting on a floured towel business, I've settled on using one of those flexible plastic cutting boards for the resting and rising.  I cover it with a bowl.  It may be an inferior technique for some reason, but it works for me.  It's really easy to ease the dough into the hot pan, as long as I don't let the plastic touch the pan. 

moptop's picture

(post #66022, reply #25 of 153)

Syb -

I gave the recipe another try this weekend using your updated measurements and WOW - was that loaf of bread awsome or what!?!?! My son immediately told me to put this on my do-again list....

Has anyone tried adding roasted garlic to the dough? Was thinking that might add some extra oomph next time. And how about whole wheat flour - think it would turn out just as great? I'm not familiar with the chemistry behing baking so not sure if it'd get the same results.

Canuck's picture

(post #66022, reply #26 of 153)

I thought at least one of the first 700 posts(!) mentioned substituting 1 cup of whole wheat for 1 cup of the white. I've been meaning to try it. If you get there first, please let me know.

Heather's picture

(post #66022, reply #27 of 153)

Yes, several people have made this substitution (including me) with great success.