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seafood soup with mussels

katinfl's picture

Greetings all-I'm new to the site and hope someone can help. Back in the early '90's,I made a mussel soup for Christmas dinner that was probably the best I've ever made.It certainly was the most piquant! I've mis-placed my magazine(another word for "lost") .I do believe I've still got every "Fine Cooking" that was published since I subscribed-lo those many years ago. At any rate, I do remember that it was neither easy nor quick-2 broths to make and 2 days.It was worth every bit ! Main ingredient was mussels-tomatoes,of course, and I think I remember shrimp in there somewhere.May have had lobster,but can't swear to it. Any help would be deeply appreciated-thanks in advance.Now all I have to do is learn to navigate the site-I'm new to computers-I finally had to join this century. Thanks-Katinfl

MadMom's picture

(post #65780, reply #1 of 31)

Hi, katinfl, and welcome to CT.  I found one mussel soup listed in the Index Guy's Index, in Vol 8, pg 48.  It doesn't sound like what you're looking for, though.  Perhaps someone else can help more.  We have some great search mavens around here...I'm not one, though!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

katinfl's picture

(post #65780, reply #2 of 31)

thanks so much-I have a lot to learn!Perhaps one of those "mavens" will be able to find the needle in the haystack! Toodles!Katinfl

schnitzel's picture

(post #65780, reply #3 of 31)

Maybe bouillabaisse? There's a recipe in Fine Cooking #25. Do you have that issue?


ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #65780, reply #11 of 31)

Oh that sounds good!

transona5's picture

(post #65780, reply #4 of 31)

Here's one I posted almost 4 years (!) ago. Not exactly what you're looking for but it's very tasty.

Mussel Soup with Cranberry Beans, Celery, and Basil

1 1/2 pounds cranberry beans, fresh, or 2/3 cup dried, soaked overnight.
3 pounds live mussels
1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/3 cup very finely chopped onion
1 Tblsp. finely chopped garlic
1 cup canned Italian plum tomatoes with their juice
Chopped fresh or dried chile pepper, to taste
1 loosely packed cup chopped celery leaves (I used 1/3 cup chopped parsley leaves)
Salt
Black pepper, ground fresh
12 large basil leaves, cut into chiffonade

1. Put the fresh or reconstituted dried cranberry beans in a saucepan with enough water to cover by at least two inches. Put a lid on the pot and bring to a steady but gentle simmer over med-low heat. Cook until tender.

2. Soak the mussels in several changes of cold water, scrubbing them each time with a stiff brush. Cut off any protuding whiskery tuft. Discard any mussel that doesn't clamp shut.

3. Put the mussels in a large saute pan, turn on the heat to high, and cover the pan. As soon as their shells swing open, transfer them to a bowl and set aside, pouring over them any liquid they may have shed. The pan should accomodate the mussels in a single layer. If it is not large enough to do so at one time, perform the operation in two or more stages.

4. As soon as the mussels are cool enough to handle, pry the shells completely open and detach the meat, discarding the shells. Work right over the bowl that contained them so that all of their liquid flows back into the bowl into which you'll put the meat. When you have shelled them all, retrieve the mussel meat from the bowl using a slotted spoon and put it in a smaller bowl. Slowly pour the juice in the bowl over the mussel meat, being careful not to pour with it the sand that will have settled at the bottom of the bowl.

5.Chose a lidded saucepan large enough to contain later all the beans and mussels and enough liquid for the soup. Put in all the olive oil and chopped onion and, without covering the pot, cook the onion over high heat, stirring from time to time, until it becomes a deep, tawny gold.

6. Add the garlic, stirring and cooking it just until you begin to notice it's aroma, taking care not to let it's color become any darker than a very pale gold.

7. Add the tomatoes with their juice and cook, always over high heat, for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the chile pepper and the chopped celery leaves, turn everything over two or thee times, and cook for 2 or 3 moe minutes.

8. Retrieve the mussel meat from it's bowl using a slotted spooon, and put in the pot, turning it over with the pot juices for 2 to 3 minutes.

9. Drain the cooked beans, but save their liquid, and add them to the pot. Turn them over with the other ingredients for a minute or two.

10. Line a strainer with a sheet of paper towel (I used coffee filters) and pour the mussel liquid through it and into the pot. Stir once or twice.

11. Add to the pot enough of the beans' cooking liquid to achieve a soupy, but not too runny consistency. Stir well, turn the heat down to low, taste for salt, add liberal grindings of black pepper, and simmer gently for 10 more minutes. Just before tranferring the contents to a serving bowl or tureen, swirl in the shredded basil.

Recipe by Marcella Hazan from the book Marcella Cucina; copyright 1997 Harper Collins Publishers

 

 

schnitzel's picture

(post #65780, reply #5 of 31)

Gee, nothing but silence. Can you hear the crickets? (G)


Jean's picture

(post #65780, reply #6 of 31)

When I post trying to be helpful and my answer is ignored, even though I know it's been read, I put an ignore on that person.  I continue to read their posts, it's just to remind myself not to knock myself out answering any further questions. shrug.



My mother's menu consisted of two choices: Take it or leave it.

- Buddy Hackett

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/


Edited 8/8/2006 8:07 pm ET by Jean

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
schnitzel's picture

(post #65780, reply #7 of 31)

MadMom's picture

(post #65780, reply #9 of 31)

It seems we have two main classes of newbies here, well, actually three if you count the ones who participate and become part of the group.  The first class comes in, posts a request, then never even bothers to return to see if the request has been answered.  Their loss.  The second group comes in, posts a request, gets an answer, and goes away.  Their loss, too.  It's sort of like when people call your number by mistake.  Some people just hang up when they realize they've reached the wrong number, and some apologize.  Younger DD has caller ID, so she loves to call the hang-ups back and say "We were evidently disconnected.  Can I help you?"



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Jean's picture

(post #65780, reply #10 of 31)

Your daughter is a hoot...where does she get that stuff from?



My mother's menu consisted of two choices: Take it or leave it.

- Buddy Hackett

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
MadMom's picture

(post #65780, reply #12 of 31)

Probably her father...heaven knows I am certainly never sarcastic!  I forgot to add that if the idiots make the mistake of trying to defend themselves by saying "It was a wrong number" then she launches into a discussion of manners and how the polite thing to do is to apologize, rather than hang up, when you get the wrong number.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

mumby's picture

(post #65780, reply #17 of 31)

While I greatly appreciate everyone's cooking advice, comments, questions and recipes I sometimes feel like I've somehow invaded a private chat room.  Many of you have personal relationships and chat about much more than cooking.  When I tuned into what I thought was going to be a discussion about cooking for the weekend I found condolences being given.  Again I felt like I'd made a wrong turn. 


I thank everyone who has replied to my queries and am always interested in your experience.  As a newcomer I can't always find the threads you refer to that the regulars apparently know.  I would like to see folks continue to share their knowledge with those of us who have much to learn.     

MadMom's picture

(post #65780, reply #18 of 31)

Mumby, there are no wrong turns here.  Think of yourself as someone who has just become part of a family.  You won't understand all of the relationships or inside jokes immediately, but you are welcomed and loved.  Stick around.  All of us were newcomers once.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Gretchen's picture

(post #65780, reply #19 of 31)

When I tuned into what I thought was going to be a discussion about cooking for the weekend I found condolences being given.  Again I felt like I'd made a wrong turn. 


Sometimes asides just happen within a thread. Skip that one and keep going. We often even return to the original question.


As for personal chat room--sometimes it does happen that way. I have met a comparative few people personally but have "corresponded" with many here for maybe 6-7 years.  Relationships build, even in the written word,  but newcomers are always welcome. I often don't get involved in the real chatty threads--nor the baking ones--because I don't have much to offer in these.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Millie's picture

(post #65780, reply #14 of 31)

Speaking from the "doesn't reply on FC forum very often" group of newbies - I really do appreciate when my questions get answered.  And if I don't say thanks, it's a matter of working two jobs and going to school full time, not owning a home computer, and not having a second to myself to reply to ANYTHING! 

When you are paying a dollar for five minutes online at a coffee shop- you have to divvy the time up carefully.

Once my question has been answered, I hope that the thank-yous go without saying and I am not seen as rude by not typing it out repeatedly.  Don't take these things personally.  Sometimes there's just no reply to make.

MadMom's picture

(post #65780, reply #15 of 31)

Millie, sometimes those of us who have no life other than sitting in front of our computer monitor forget what it was like back when we had a job, kids, and not a spare minute...although must say I have a hard time remembering not having a computer!  Forgive us if we sometimes are harsh...perhaps we should all try to walk a mile in someone else's shoes before we complain!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Millie's picture

(post #65780, reply #16 of 31)

Oh - how I love days off when I can sit at my sister's house (like today) and just see what the online world has to offer me.  Chatting with friends in distant places, and checking out recipes and FC, and so on and so on.  But back to the computer free home in about half an hour -
I don't miss owning a computer, simply because I dont' think I NEED one - but I would still LIKE to have one!!!

SallyBR1's picture

(post #65780, reply #20 of 31)

Let's clarify a few important points here.

First of all, you do need a computer. You simply THINK you don t.

On the positive side, you already admit you would LIKE to have one. So, there is hope for you.

Basically, it boils down to: you like it, you want it, you need to have it. If you are uncomfortable with these statements, stick around and we will help you get used to them

Welcome to CT, the enablers-paradise!

 


 


"Her shimmyshaky is much better than her chimichurri"
(Glenys, June 2006)

unbaked's picture

(post #65780, reply #22 of 31)

roflmao.


Eres mala, muy mala :P


'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

Millie's picture

(post #65780, reply #23 of 31)

No... I really don't NEED one.  Seriously, what do I NEED a computer for? 

I have a pen and paper if anything has to be recorded for historical prosperity - or for letters and notes to people.  I have a telephone which is great for instant messaging - I call someone and they answer instantly.  I have a calculator for all those tricky math assignments for school.  I highly doubt that I would get to the end of my life and think, "Damn, I wish I would have had a computer when I was 26."


Back to the wishlist, I would LIKE to have one to continue these conversations - I do love the forum conversations.  Unfortunately, it's Sunday night and I have to go home.

Gretchen's picture

(post #65780, reply #24 of 31)

There is a computer in the paper today--at Office Depot I think--for net $99. That is with a printer.


DS just gave his little 5 year old one of his old laptops (a real nice one--skinny and small) and the DGS was SO proud.  "Baba, that's MY computer. Daddy gave it to me."


Gretchen


Edited 9/3/2006 9:03 pm ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
unbaked's picture

(post #65780, reply #25 of 31)

I didn't need one until I finally bought one in 1996. If I had bought one a year earlier I'd probably be retired by now, but that's another story. Buying a computer was the best thing I ever did for myself business-wise.


I make my living with my computer, so it's a different thing for me, but with almost everyone being online these days, there are actually things you can't do without internet access.


I've called companies and have been told, 'oh, that's only available online'. I do virtually all my shopping online and pay far, far less than I would in a store. I do all my banking, bill paying, etc online.


Almost everyone I know has a computer and it's an easy way of communicating. Aso, the internet is an endless resource if you choose to use it.


But yeah, by the age of 26, you really should have already have one. They're so cheap these days relative to what my first one cost me in 96, it was a major investment back then.


I think I paid about 1600 dollars for my first computer, that was a lot of money, heck, it still is. I finally stopped buying a new one every year and instead purchase Dell Workstations that last me 5 years or more and are almost infinity upgradeable. But my needs are a lot different than the average user.  Any computer being sold today is more than adequate for a home user. 99 bucks with a printer is a heck of a deal. I've spent more than that for shoes.


 


 


'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

MadMom's picture

(post #65780, reply #26 of 31)

I'm older than you, but spent over $6000 for the first home computer we bought.  It was a real mother of all computers, too...had a ten meg hard drive, WOW!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Gretchen's picture

(post #65780, reply #27 of 31)

Oh, wait. For DH, I got a Radio Shack "computer", used tapes (tried to use audio tapes!!!) and a 64_B memory!!!!  $500!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
MadMom's picture

(post #65780, reply #28 of 31)

Those were the good old days, right?  I remember thinking "Wow, ten whole megabytes of memory.  I'll never use it all up!"  My first mainframe computer I worked on was an IBM 1401 with 4K of memory, and I still remember the first mainframe I saw with a megabyte of memory...couldn't believe it!  I've said this before, but when I went to work for IBM fresh out of college, they had a presentation and said that someday computers would be small enough to fit on a desk.  Yeah, right, like we believed that would ever happen!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Gretchen's picture

(post #65780, reply #29 of 31)

THAT was it ---KB.  What a really cheap dollar store calculator exceeds now!!


Have you read The World is Flat? 


Gretchen
Gretchen
MadMom's picture

(post #65780, reply #30 of 31)

No, but I've heard the author interviewed on NPR several times.  Sounds interesting.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Gretchen's picture

(post #65780, reply #31 of 31)

As I have said before, he is my idol particularly in relation to the Mideast.


The first 100 pages of the book is about the development of computers and more particularly the internet. It is fascinating.


Gretchen


Edited 9/4/2006 11:11 am ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
Gretchen's picture

(post #65780, reply #21 of 31)

They practically give them away now. Even laptops.

Gretchen

Gretchen
transona5's picture

(post #65780, reply #8 of 31)

LOL!! It took me forever to find it because I forgot it had cranberry beans in it. I could have made the search a whole lot shorter if i'd remembered that!

Chirpy chirpy cheep cheep!