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Recipes using pomegranate molasses

buffybob's picture

I recently purchased a bottle of pomegranate molasses to use in a dressing for a spinach and strawberry salad and now wonder if anyone could suggest other uses for it.

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #66629, reply #1 of 32)

I used it in place of the maple syrup in the Five Ingredient Chicken recipe.
it was very nice.

~RuthAnn
foom!


~RuthAnn

Gretchen's picture

(post #66629, reply #2 of 32)

Really!!!!! I'm amazed, and will try it. Thanks.

Gretchen

Gretchen
KitchenWitch's picture

(post #66629, reply #3 of 32)

I was out maple syrup and didn't realize it until after I started the recipe. So much for my mise en plas skills! I've also used honey as well.


I'm well stocked with maple syrup, thanks to Li's pal Viking Kitty!


~RuthAnn
foom!


~RuthAnn

dorcast's picture

(post #66629, reply #20 of 32)

What are the other 4 ingredients?

I don't like maple, but do have bottle of pomegranate molasses.

Thanks.

Edited - I found the recipe, will try it this weekend.


Edited 5/1/2008 7:34 pm ET by Dorcast

Heather's picture

(post #66629, reply #4 of 32)

Muhummara is delicious, although I add lemon juice to this recipe for my taste.

avak123's picture

(post #66629, reply #5 of 32)

I love this recipe! It definitely needs a warning label--ADDICTIVE!

Heather's picture

(post #66629, reply #6 of 32)

You too? LOL

avak123's picture

(post #66629, reply #7 of 32)

Yes! I also add a little lemon and usually omit the sugar.

buffybob's picture

(post #66629, reply #8 of 32)

Thanks so much for the recipe. I'm going to give it a try. I'm not familiar with Aleppo Pepper and wonder if I could use regular paprika instead of the hungarian paprika?

avak123's picture

(post #66629, reply #9 of 32)

Not Heather, but I think paprika subs beautifully. I don't think you will be disappointed!

Heather's picture

(post #66629, reply #10 of 32)

I love Aleppo pepper. Try the recipe with paprika but look for Aleppo for next time. ;-)

Dashx's picture

(post #66629, reply #11 of 32)

In FC issue 85, there is a recipe for muhammara, but it's not called that, it's called "Roasted Red Pepper & Walnut Dip with Pomegranate Molasses"...lol. It's very good, as is an old Cooking Light Recipe, from "The Best of Cooking Light #4".  I've made the one posted in the link above from the LA Times; it's very good, too.


Also, in FC issue #91 there is a recipe for roasted chicken which calls for pomegranate juice and orange juice. I sub the 1 cup juice with 1/4 cup pom molasses ( a little more if you have pom syrup), mix the in the orange juice, and heat through. I've found that in most recipes that call for pom juice, you may sub pom molasses, taking into consideration that pom molasses is thicker and more concentrated in flavor.


Another recipe that I've made that calls for pom molasses is from the LA Times, January 2008, the Culinary SOS column. The recipe is from Cayenne Cafe, very simple to make, and delicious.


Pomegranate molasses is very easy to make; several recipes are floating out there on the web. It lasts almost forever in the fridge.


Edited 4/30/2008 11:41 pm by Dashx

buffybob's picture

(post #66629, reply #12 of 32)

I've checked out the FC #91 issue for the Pomegranate-Orange Chicken recipe and will definitely give it a try following your suggestion to use pomegranate molasses. Thanks

Dashx's picture

(post #66629, reply #14 of 32)

You're welcome.  I just looked at my notes, and saw that I chopped the veggies a bit smaller the 2nd time I made it, as they were not as thoroughly cooked as I would have liked, the first time around.

avak123's picture

(post #66629, reply #13 of 32)

Another way you might want to consider using it is as a side to grilled meat or chicken--just using a tad.


I had forgotten that Canyon Ranch does this in Canyon Ranch Cooks with lamb chops. They dust the chops with salt, pepper, sumac, and grill. They serve the grilled chops with a small dollup of pom molasses.


I love sumac for its citrus flavors, but think the dish fine without it. 


Just a thought. :-)

Biscuit's picture

(post #66629, reply #15 of 32)

Your thread reminded me that I had a bottle up in the cabinet.  I pulled it out last night when I wanted to grill a pork tenderloin.  Mixed 1 tbl. pom-molasses with 3 tbl. pineapple juice concentrate, added some chopped fresh rosemary, and ta-da!  A very, very tasty glaze for my tenderloin. 

Statesmen will invent cheap lies, putting blame upon the nation that is attacked, and every man will be glad of those conscience-soothing falsities, and will diligently study them, and refuse to examine any refutations of them; and thus he will by and by convince himself that the war is just, and will thank God for the better sleep he enjoys after this process of grotesque self-deception.
- Mark Twain

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

Jean's picture

(post #66629, reply #16 of 32)

That sounds good. I'll bet it would be good on chicken too. Is your pineapple juice concentrate frozen? I don't do the shopping so I've not seen it.





Humor is a rubber sword - it allows you to make a point without drawing blood. Mary Hirsch
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Marcia's picture

(post #66629, reply #17 of 32)

Not Biscuit, but my stores have had frozen pineapple juice for as long as I can remember.

Good luck to your designated shopper. ;-)

Biscuit's picture

(post #66629, reply #18 of 32)

Yes, frozen.  I only buy frozen juice concentrate, and I happen to have a preference for Orange-Pineapple and Pineapple (G).  So I always have it on hand.  Plus, pineapple juice concentrate makes a great basting glaze for shrimp and pork and chicken in the summer, and takes to all sorts of spices as an addition, like curry, chili powder, etc.

Statesmen will invent cheap lies, putting blame upon the nation that is attacked, and every man will be glad of those conscience-soothing falsities, and will diligently study them, and refuse to examine any refutations of them; and thus he will by and by convince himself that the war is just, and will thank God for the better sleep he enjoys after this process of grotesque self-deception.
- Mark Twain

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

TracyK's picture

(post #66629, reply #19 of 32)

Also, it makes a bada$$ frozen Sex on the Beach. :-)

CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

Jean's picture

(post #66629, reply #23 of 32)

Well, it's on my grocery list now. Thanks.





Humor is a rubber sword - it allows you to make a point without drawing blood. Mary Hirsch
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Marcia's picture

(post #66629, reply #25 of 32)

What's on your grocery list - space invaders? <g> That wasn't really a grin, it was a chortle.

Jean's picture

(post #66629, reply #26 of 32)

I have more than my share of those now. LOL





Humor is a rubber sword - it allows you to make a point without drawing blood. Mary Hirsch
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Marcia's picture

(post #66629, reply #27 of 32)

As do I, but it's not funny, it's distressing. Oh, well...someday.

thecooktoo's picture

(post #66629, reply #21 of 32)

Interesting that your question came up when it did.  Yesterdays Washington Post Food Section headline was on Space Invaders...those things you buy once and they hang around for ever, like pomegranate molasses, preserved lemons, chipotle in adobo, kaffir lime leaves, tamarind paste, etc.  Here's a link to the article and some recipes to use up space invaders.


Jim


http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/04/29/AR2008042900517.html

Gretchen's picture

(post #66629, reply #22 of 32)

What a GREAT name!! My first endeavor at a computer game!! March march march. How far we have come--or fallen, maybe!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
Jean's picture

(post #66629, reply #24 of 32)

I've bookmarked that site. Neat. thanks.





Humor is a rubber sword - it allows you to make a point without drawing blood. Mary Hirsch
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Maedl's picture

(post #66629, reply #28 of 32)

To use pomegranate molasses, think sweet-sour. A little bit of the pomegranate molasses gives a nice flavor boost--try just a bit of it on its own so you get a sense of how powerful it is. I used a few drops in a salad dressing (with olive oil and balsamic vinegar) and it was quite tasty.

Also think Middle Eastern--pomegranate molasses is found in many recipes from the Mediterranean basin. The muhamarra is addictive--I have made it three times this spring as part of mezze. Each time it has elicited rave reviews.

"Crazy Water, Pickled Lemons" by Diana Henry has several recipes that use pomegranate molasses. If you haven't seen this book, get it immediately. Every recipe I have tried has been outstanding. The flavors are so intriguing and tantalizing! Of course, you'll wind up with a few more things in your pantry, like harissa and orange and rose waters, but you will find ways to use them!

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
EllaJean's picture

(post #66629, reply #29 of 32)

I can't wait to check out the book Crazy Water, Pickled Lemons and thanks for your suggestions for uses of pomegranate molasses. I've heard so many comments on how good the muhamarra is so I'll be trying it out this week.

Maedl's picture

(post #66629, reply #30 of 32)

The muhamarra is worth extra effort on the bread or crackers that are serve along side. I have baked my own flatbread and focaccia and both were excellent. You might want to do some other mezze to go along with the muhamarra--like baba ganoush and the fig-anchovy mixture (also in Crazy Water). This kind of spread lends itself to a long pre-dinner conversation on the patio! Enjoy!

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com