NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

New Year's Eve Dinner Help

Gretchen's picture

If the cut of meat you have is  a backstrap or tenderloin  stewing  it will give you a piece of leather as will overcooking it.


If you must do this to a nice piece of venison I might suggest sauerbraten. Do your guests just not eat rare meat--beef, for example.


And if you make a ragout/stew from venison, I also suggest not cooking it very long. It is so lean it can become little hunks of hard meat.  I posted this on another thread as what had happened to me recently. Slow cooking just doesn't really mean much with venison as there is NO fat to internally baste the meat.


A couple of years ago I made a VERY rich stew that was truly memorable. The chunks were fairly large, the sauce rich with mushrooms and some tomato paste.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Jean's picture

(post #66016, reply #1 of 7)

If you're cooking a back strap or tenderloin,the sear and quick roast would be the way to go. Any other cut would be best with a long moist braise. You've got the right idea. Low and slow.


Edited to say, Gretchen beat me to the punch...Sauerbraten venison is TDF!.




They told me I was gullible and I believed them.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/


Edited 12/26/2006 11:41 pm ET by Jean

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
BonnieinHolland's picture

(post #66016, reply #2 of 7)

I just made a small venison roast (2.2 lbs/one kilo) for Christmas Eve dinner - marinated it overnight in dry apple cider and stock with fresh thyme, bay leaves, and rosemary.  The next day, I dried the meat thoroughly and browned it well in a pan with butter and olive oil, removed the meat to a plate, added some shallots and garlic to the pan, deglazed wtih a cup of armangac, added the marinade to the pan along with the meat, covered the pan, and cooked it in a very low oven for two hours.  Finished the sauce with potato starch.  The meat was very very tender and the sauce terrific.  Dead simple.  Served the meal with a couple bottles of older Bordeaux.


cheers, Bonnie

Jean's picture

(post #66016, reply #3 of 7)

That sounds lovely.




They told me I was gullible and I believed them.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Geoffchef's picture

(post #66016, reply #4 of 7)

Welcome James. If this is a nice cut like a tenderloin or rib roast it would be a crime to overcook it, and it will cook faster than a corresponding hunk of beef. On occasion I cook bison, which is similarly lean. With a piece of beef filet I go 7-8 minutes per side on a hot barbecue to get the level of doneness DW and I like - between medium rare and medium. This assumes a thick piece of steak - 1.5 - 2".  With bison I reduce this to about 5 minutes per side. Similarly, if I barbecue a whole tenderloin, about 4 lbs., I take it to the same internal temperature as beef - about 125 - but it takes less time.
If you are oven roasting it, start at 450 - 500* for a few minutes to get the Maillard reaction started and then drop the temp to 350 until you get the right internal temperature.
My advice is to ask your friends to sample the meat properly cooked to medium rare. If they ask for it to be cooked more, throw it back on the barbie for a while - it's their loss.
Happy New Year!

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

MadMom's picture

(post #66016, reply #5 of 7)

Hi, James1, and welcome to CT.  Listen to Jean; she is the venison cooking champion around here.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Gretchen's picture

(post #66016, reply #6 of 7)

Then a nice slow braise should be good. You could do something with a nice red wine "gravy" and lots of mushrooms.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Gretchen's picture

(post #66016, reply #7 of 7)

Oh, cherries are delicious with venison. And cranberries are too, but cherries are more special.


No more than 300*. Maybe look for a recipe for a rump roast and see some method there. They would be similar in the leanness category. I'll look later--.


Gretchen
Gretchen