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Navajo Fry Bread

TGNY's picture

Hi all,

Looking for a recipe for(Navajo) Fry Bread. Had it in the South West several years ago and thought I might try my hand at it. I found a few recipes online but thought I would inquire here as well. TIA

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #65446, reply #1 of 27)

Can't help you with a recipe, but the thought of it has my mouth watering for some really good southwest food!

MadMom's picture

(post #65446, reply #2 of 27)

Don't have a recipe myself, but did find several when googling.  Here's a couple (DBMNMR):


Version #1



  • 2 cups Flour
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 3 tsp. Baking Powder
  • 1 cup Water

Version #2



  • 3 cups Flour
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 1 tbs. Baking Powder
  • 1 1/2 cup water
  • 1 tbs. Shortening (cut in)

Using the ingredients from either version above, mix ingredients and let sit for 10-15 minutes.


Break off a ball of dough about golf ball size and pat out no thicker than 1/4 inch. (In some tribal traditions a hole is always made in the center which has spiritual significance)

Fry in deep hot oil to a light golden brown, turn once to brown both sides. (Oil is hot enough if a small test piece of dough dropped in the oil begins cooking almost immediately and rises to the top.) Drain bread well and pat with paper towel to remove excess oil. Keep covered in a bowl while cooking to keep bread warm.

Serving - Usually eaten like bread with soup, stew or posole

Variations - Eat with honey, powdered sugar, cinnamon.




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whatscooking's picture

(post #65446, reply #3 of 27)

My son actually made this is school for a project on Native americans.  The recipes posted look very similar to the one he made.  It is delicious bread.

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Aberwacky's picture

(post #65446, reply #4 of 27)

I've tried three times to post a recipe from a Bobby Flay show, but when I try to post it won't let me.  So, let's try a link instead.


AAARRRRGFFFHHHHHH!!!! IT won't let me do that either!!!!!


Well, if you search on www.foodtv.com for Navajo Fry bread, there's recipes from Bobby Flay and one from Emeril Lagasse.


Leigh


 


I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers). . .

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Jean's picture

(post #65446, reply #5 of 27)

Copy and paste worked for me.


Navajo Fry Bread

Recipe courtesy Emeril Lagasse, 2001

Show: 
Emeril Live

Episode: 
Native American



2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon plus 6 cups vegetable oil
3/4 cup warm water
1 cup powdered sugar, as optional topping
1 cup honey, as optional topping


In the bowl of a food processor, mix the dry ingredients. Stir in 1 tablespoon of the oil and the water, and process until smooth. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and gently knead until the dough is just elastic and comes together, being careful not to over work. Shape the dough into a ball, cover tightly with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.
Divide the dough into 12 equal pieces. Flatten each piece and roll into a 7-inch circle, making as thin as possible. Poke a hole in the center with the handle of a wooden spoon or your finger.
In a large saute pan or deep fryer, heat the 6 cups of oil to 360 degrees F. Slip the rounds 1 at a time into the hot oil and cook for 2 minutes, turning once with a long-handled spoon. Drain on paper towels and repeat with the remaining dough.
Sprinkle the fried bread with powdered sugar and drizzle with honey, as desired, and serve.


Tewa Tacos (AKA- Indian Tacos)

Recipe courtesy Indian Pueblo Cultural Center Albuquerque

Show: 
FoodNation With Bobby Flay

Episode: 

Albuquerque Native American


For the fry bread:
2 cups unsifted all-purpose flour
1/2 cup dry milk solids
2 teaspoons double-acting baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons lard, cut into 1/2-inch bits, plus 1 pound lard, for deep frying



Combine the flour, dry milk solids, baking powder and salt, and sift them into a deep bowl. Add the lard bits and, with your fingertips, rub the flour and fat together until the mixture resembles flakes of coarse meal. Pour in the water and toss the ingredients together until the dough can be gathered into a ball. Drape the bowl with a kitchen towel and then let the dough sit at room temperature for about 2 hours. After sitting, tear the dough into 6 equal pieces. Then, on a lightly floured surface, roll each dough ball into a circle about 4 inches in diameter and 1/4-inch thick. With a small knife, cut 2 (4 to 5-inch) long parallel slits completely through the dough, down the center of each rolled piece, spacing the slits about 1-inch apart. In a heavy, 10-inch cast iron skillet, melt the remaining pound of lard over moderate heat until it is very hot but not smoking. The melted fat should be about 1-inch deep, add more lard if necessary. Fry the rolled dough, 1 at a time, for about 2 minutes on each side, turning them once with tongs. The bread will puff slightly and become crisp and brown. Drain the Navajo fry bread on paper towels and serve warm.


Tewa Taco:
1 1/2 pounds ground beef
6 round fry bread pieces, recipe follows
1/2 poundcCheddar cheese, grated
1 head lettuce, shredded
3 tomatoes, chopped
1 onion, chopped
Salsa, optional
Green chile, optional



Brown the ground beef in a saute pan. Divide equally onto 6 fry bread rounds. Top with cheese, lettuce, tomatoes, and onions. Great served with salsa and green chile!
A viewer, who may not be a professional cook, provided this recipe. The FN chefs have not tested this recipe and therefore, we cannot make representation as to the results.




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Aberwacky's picture

(post #65446, reply #6 of 27)

I kept getting a Taunton Error message telling me I hadn't entered any text or category or recipient. 


You da woman.


Leigh


 


I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers). . .

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Theodora's picture

(post #65446, reply #7 of 27)

Tell me, is this the rough equivalent of the midwestern state fair elephant ear?

"No amount of time can erase the memory of a good cat, and no amount of masking tape can ever totally remove his fur from your couch. " ~Leo Dworken

Jean's picture

(post #65446, reply #8 of 27)

I've never had one, so I wouldn't dare hazard a guess.  :/


Keep learning: Learn more about the computer, crafts, gardening, whatever. Never let the brain get idle. "An idle mind is the devil's workshop." And the devil's name is Alzheimer's!


 

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
whatscooking's picture

(post #65446, reply #9 of 27)

Never had an elephant ear, but  I would liken it to a chewy, fried pita bread. 

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #65446, reply #10 of 27)

kind of, but chewier, and not necessarily sweet.

Theodora's picture

(post #65446, reply #11 of 27)

Given the recent spate of diabetes discussion, I'm going to pretend I didn't even see the recipe here. I'm going to go have a nice bowl of lentils instead.

"No amount of time can erase the memory of a good cat, and no amount of masking tape can ever totally remove his fur from your couch. " ~Leo Dworken

DeannaS's picture

(post #65446, reply #12 of 27)

Nope - the midwestern state fair elephant ear is a yeast bread dough, deep-fried, and it's covered with sugar and cinnamon.

Now, the midwestern bakery elephant ear - that's different too - that's more like a laminated dough, saturated with sugar and cinnamon to get a crispy caramelized effect.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #65446, reply #13 of 27)

Yeah, but the taste and texture are roughly similar.

DeannaS's picture

(post #65446, reply #14 of 27)

I've never actually had the Navajo fry bread, so I wouldn't know how they actually turn out. The yeast kind is darn good though. ;)

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

KarenP's picture

(post #65446, reply #16 of 27)

I've never actually had the Navajo fry bread, so I wouldn't know how they actually turn out. The yeast kind is darn good though. ;)


  The same here.  I've only had Dakota Ojibwe yeast style. 

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #65446, reply #20 of 27)

Oops, it shows I haven't been paying attention. The frybread I've had has also been made with yeast.

transona5's picture

(post #65446, reply #17 of 27)

"Now, the midwestern bakery elephant ear - that's different too - that's more like a laminated dough, saturated with sugar and cinnamon to get a crispy caramelized effect."


Would those be Palmiers? Some of our customers referred to them as elephant ears. The ones I made didn't have cinnamon though. Only just sugar or sugar and bittersweet chocolate. 


Edited 1/16/2006 10:51 am ET by transona5

 

DeannaS's picture

(post #65446, reply #18 of 27)

I think they're very much like palmiers, but not exactly like them. Aren't palmiers sliced so that the layers are visible from the top? Elephant ears have a smooth top, with the layers all "inside" - if that makes sense. But, the taste and texture are very similar.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

transona5's picture

(post #65446, reply #19 of 27)

Yes they are, and it just hit me. I know exactly what you're talking about!

 

Glenys's picture

(post #65446, reply #22 of 27)

Palmiers are made with puff pastry, so that eliminates them for sure.

Fry-bread lovers:http://www.frybreadlove.org/index.htm


Edited 1/18/2006 4:52 pm by Glenys

DeannaS's picture

(post #65446, reply #24 of 27)

Well, sure, the real thing - but we're talking midwest bastardizations of culinary treats here. :)

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

sanderson's picture

(post #65446, reply #27 of 27)

Fry bread

1 C lukewarm water
1/2 pkg instant yeast
1 t baking powder
1/2 t salt
3 T sugar
6 C flour

Put the flour, sugar, BP & salt in a medium bowl; mix and make a well.
Soften the yeast in the water for a couple of minutes; stir well.
Pour yeast water into well. Using very light strokes with either a fork or spoon, stir the yeast water bringing in a small amount of the flour mixture. When the dough is the consistency of pancake batter, let it rest and get bubbly...about 5 to 10 minutes. So now you have this very bubbly batter/dough sitting down in a flour well. With one hand rotate the bowl, with the other hand using just your fingertips lightly roll over the edges of the dough incorporating the flour bit by bit. You will not need all of the flour. This is not stirring and in no way is kneading. The very light strokes keeps the dough texture even and incredibly sticky. So nows a good time to rinse off and start heating the fry medium. Don't get water in the pan or you'll get lots of spluttering. About an inch deep in an 8 to 10 inch cast iron skillet works. Fry temperature is 375 F which I get to over a medium heat. Back to the dough. Pinch an egg sized gob off with floury fingers. Lightly stretch and pat the dough into a circle, not too thin. This is all in the air, not on the counter. Think of travel videos of hand made tortillas and good luck with the flipping back and forth over the backs of your hands. I haven't got that part down yet. le sigh. Just before setting the dough into the hot fat, poke a finger sized hole into the middle to promote even cooking. Lay it into the fat having the furthest edge be farthest away from you. When the fat is the right temperature and the dough is the right consistency it will puff and brown and be ready to be turned in about 40 seconds. Brown the other side and remove to paper to drain.

Memsahib's picture

(post #65446, reply #23 of 27)

Leigh, in future you might try this:

Open Cooks Talk, Post New. Minimize. (Cooks Talk will disappear but you'll see the name at the bottom of your screen).
Go to the recipe and right click. Click on "Copy".
Click on "Cooks Talk" at the bottom of the screen. Go to Post New. In the message box, right click. Then click on "Paste". The recipe should appear in the message box and you're set to go to enter the name of discussion etc. Hope this is useful.

To one who shares food it is sugar

To one who eats alone it is a toad

Punjabi Proverb

TGNY's picture

(post #65446, reply #26 of 27)

Thank you all, I will attempt one(or all) of these recipes. I searched (hate to say googled)for it too, but just thought I would try here as well.

Catskinner's picture

(post #65446, reply #15 of 27)

Hey!

What are you doing over here too <G>.

OK, here's fry bread. Those quick breads are sort of OK but not really traditional in my opinion. My grandmother taught us to make it with real bread dough.

Take any bread dough that you already like, get it to the point where you would ordinarily bake it, take a piece about the size of a golf ball, roll it out real thin, and fry it in hot oil.

That's it.

FRY BREAD POWER!

Success is not the key to happiness. Happiness is the key to success.
-Albert Schweitzer, philosopher, physician, musician, Nobel laureate
(1875-1965)

[edited to be less opinionated <G>]


Edited 1/13/2006 9:58 pm by Catskinner

TGNY's picture

(post #65446, reply #25 of 27)

Psst, don't tell anybody I was here.

Actually it is much more civil over here and I cook more these days now that my house is done.

PricklyPear's picture

(post #65446, reply #21 of 27)

Someone mentioned Navajo Fry Bread made with yeast.  I'm interested in acquiring the recipe.  Any ideas where I might acquire it?