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thecooktoo's picture

I've got a cooking class coming up in about a week or ten days that features cookies.  I've got all kinds of recipes for cookies that I know will work, but I really would like to find some that are new, different and out of the ordinary.  Marvelously good would work, tool.


I will have a full house, 12 students, they will be cooing in groups of 3 for 3 h ours.  I need at least 5 or 6 recipes that I can Provide for them.


I guess what I'm really looking for is unusal cookie ideas.  Not looking for jazzed up chocolate chips or oatmeal raisin...got all those...looking for "different"


 Any help would be appreciated.


Jim

SquarePeg's picture

(post #66851, reply #1 of 136)

Maybe a theme?


Special holiday cookies from around the world?


taralles, Hecker Nuesse Kuchen, Molasses Cream, Persimmon Cookies, Maple Date, Apple Chews, Miniature Danish, A butter shortbread, Fig and Walnut, Buccalleti, Amarena, Dolce de Fichi, etc

Ozark's picture

(post #66851, reply #2 of 136)

These are my favorites every year.


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Glenys's picture

(post #66851, reply #23 of 136)

Are you going with unusual cookies or just new to them? I'd be PO'd if chocolate chip cookies were in the selection. Hear that FC?

BossHog's picture

(post #66851, reply #24 of 136)

But chocolate chip cookies are more than just food - They have medicinal properties.

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Glenys's picture

(post #66851, reply #25 of 136)

Just when I thought I'd found another kindred spirit, growing up on a farm and doesn't eat eggs, you ruin it with the chocolate chip cookie thing.
At least the cattle in the photo were black.


Edited 11/30/2008 6:41 pm by Glenys

Sphere's picture

(post #66851, reply #3 of 136)

What about wholesome and tasty dog treats? No kiddin, I know some are made "Gourmet" and all natural..and if the participating cooks have canine buddies...well, you'll be a hit. I mean, some are edible to humans as well..if ya leave out the bone meal and dried blood..LOL

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thecooktoo's picture

(post #66851, reply #8 of 136)

I think I might just do that...thanks for the idea.


Jim

rosie t's picture

(post #66851, reply #4 of 136)

Gourmet magazines favorite cookie recipes from 1941-2008


http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/cookies/1940s


You can find most of the recipes on Epicurious and check the reviews.

Glenys's picture

(post #66851, reply #5 of 136)

Are you making all sweet or adding a few savoury as well?

kathymcmo's picture

(post #66851, reply #9 of 136)

That reminds me, how did those potato chip cookies turn out? Did I miss your report?

Glenys's picture

(post #66851, reply #13 of 136)

I'm so bad, I didn't get any chips yet so I'm behind in baking and reporting.

thecooktoo's picture

(post #66851, reply #10 of 136)

I always make a savory shortbread recipe that I have had for a long time, but could sure  use another idea. 


I am not a baker and have no business teaching a cookie class, but everybody keeps asking for it and the county keeps insisting that I add it to the schedule.  Last year I got so frustrated I almost went to the store and bought a bunch of mixes...but my wife wouldn't let me!


Jim

Rae's picture

(post #66851, reply #12 of 136)

Pam Anderson has a wine cookie in her latest book. Very good. I don't have the recipe handy but I can find it if you want. It's made with red wine and is a savory cookie.

SquarePeg's picture

(post #66851, reply #15 of 136)

I've made these before and they are good. An old fashioned italian wine cookie


http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Wine-Cookies-Original-Italian/Detail.aspx


 

thecooktoo's picture

(post #66851, reply #34 of 136)

Would like it if you can find it.  I searched and could not fin d it on line.


Jim

thecooktoo's picture

(post #66851, reply #35 of 136)

Thanks for your imput.  I have to filter through all of your suggestions and sit down and study the recipes.  I have decided that we are going to do 1 bar, 2 savory and 3 or 4 rolled or dropped cookies. As I said earlier, no CC of any kind, no Oatmeal raisin, no cranberries.  At least one will be a shortbread (agree with Glynis that it's hard to make ugly shortbreads!).


Your suggestions have been invaluable and I sincerely appreciate your support.  You are a great group (sometimes politically misguided, but great none the less  ;-)


Jim

MadMom's picture

(post #66851, reply #36 of 136)

Politically misguided?  I resemble that remark, LOL.  We love you, even if you aren't with us politically.



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Rae's picture

(post #66851, reply #37 of 136)

I found this adaptation online.

Wine Biscuits With Cracked Black Pepper
The Washington Post, October 29, 2008
Cuisine: American
Course: Snack
Features: Make-Ahead Recipes
Summary:

These homemade wafers can increase the appeal of a buffet cheese display. The bread flour makes a firmer cracker.

The recipe doubles easily, though you might have to do it in 2 batches, because the dough is made in the food processor. The cap of a 48-ounce bottle of Crisco vegetable oil can be used for a cookie cutter here.

MAKE AHEAD: The baked, cooled biscuits can be stored in an airtight tin for up to 1 month.

Makes 42 small biscuits

Ingredients:
1/2 cup dry red wine
1 cup bread flour
3 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon cracked black pepper
1 teaspoon minced rosemary or thyme leaves
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Directions:

Bring the wine to a boil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Boil for 2 to 3 minutes or until the liquid has reduced by half. Remove from the heat.

Position oven racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven; preheat to 325 degrees. Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone liners.

Combine the flour, sugar, black pepper, rosemary or thyme, salt and baking powder in a food processor; pulse to mix well.

Combine the reduced wine and oil in a liquid measuring cup, then add to the food processor. Process until a lump of dough forms.

Lightly flour a work surface. Turn the dough out onto the work surface and roll out to a little more than 1/8-inch thick. Use a 1 1/2-inch round cookie cutter to cut rounds of dough, placing them 1/2 inch apart on the baking sheets. Re-roll the dough scraps once or twice to yield the full amount of biscuits.

Bake for about 15 minutes, then rotate the baking sheets top to bottom and front to back between the 2 oven racks. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes or until golden brown and crisp. Transfer the biscuits to a wire rack to cool completely before serving or storing.

Recipe Source:
Adapted from "The Perfect Recipe for Losing Weight & Eating Great," by Pam Anderson (Houghton Mifflin, 2008).

MadMom's picture

(post #66851, reply #38 of 136)

I didn't check this against Pam Anderson's recipe, but hers certainly are good.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Rae's picture

(post #66851, reply #39 of 136)

This is an adaptation of her recipe so I want to check the book for a comparison. I think I loaned this book out, I have a printout of recipes from attending her class at Central Market somewhere.

MadMom's picture

(post #66851, reply #40 of 136)

"attending her class at Central Market"


You really know how to hurt a girl, don't you!  The one thing I miss most about leaving Texas is Central Market and the wonderful classes they had there.




Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!
Rae's picture

(post #66851, reply #41 of 136)

I do love Central Market - great store. And they are so helpful, when I bought acorn squash this weekend I asked the produce guy to cut it for me, which he did. Almost impossible for me to cut a hard squash. But I've never even been to a TJ store! And not going to mention the oppressive heat...

MadMom's picture

(post #66851, reply #42 of 136)

Believe me, TJ cannot hold a candle to Central Market.  I keep wanting them to just open one in the sandhills, but of course, they won't!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

thecooktoo's picture

(post #66851, reply #44 of 136)

I had an opportunity several years ago to assist Pam in several cooking classes locally.  She was absolutely wonderful to work with, had a great time assisting and learned a lot.


Jim

MadMom's picture

(post #66851, reply #45 of 136)

I do think I volunteered once at Central Market when she taught there.  A lovely woman.  That was before her diet, but she still was beautiful, had a great spirit.  Reminds me, I have to get back onto her eating plan.  I stopped posting pictures, because I was making things several times, but it really is a good method of eating.  Much better than dinner tonight which was potato chips and three glasses of wine.  Doctor said I had to rest for 24 hours and couldn't be up cooking, so what could I do?



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Glenys's picture

(post #66851, reply #14 of 136)

Considering how easy it is to make a good looking shortbread cookie, the results in those photos are nasty. But then, not every baby is cute, according to Seinfeld.

SquarePeg's picture

(post #66851, reply #17 of 136)

Someone with real skill could do it properly, eh?

Glenys's picture

(post #66851, reply #19 of 136)

Someone with no skill, or child-like handling, can make an exceptionally beautiful shortbread. That's why I'm wondering about the product in the photos.

MadMom's picture

(post #66851, reply #20 of 136)

Glenys (I think...the mind is the first thing to go!) has a wonderful recipe for lemon cookies with black pepper.  I'm sure someone better at searching than I could find it.  They were delicious, and very different.


I went to a cookie class last Saturday, but the chef put orange zest into sugar cookie dough, and I didn't care for it at all.  She did take one roll, brush on a bit of egg wash, and roll it in palm sugar with ginger.  That was good.  If you have a good sugar cookie recipe, you might try it.




Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!