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pamilyn's picture

O.K., Here is the deal. A friend brought back seeds from Italy last year. I planted two long rows and now I have  a TON of the stuff. Any suggestions? I do eat alot of soup over the winter. I am not sure how it differs from regular Kale as I am not very familiar with this vegetable.  I tried to find some recipes but nothing very interesting came up. Thoughts? Thanks, Pamilyn 

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

Marcia's picture

(post #67069, reply #18 of 50)

No hurry. I could dig through things but don't feel very energetic at the moment.

butterscotch's picture

(post #67069, reply #20 of 50)

It's issue no. 74--at p. 51.  The article is about winter vegetable side dishes, including one for kale, and there's a little box on p. 51 where the author, Bill Telepan, advocates freezing kale before cooking it for better texture.

Marcia's picture

(post #67069, reply #22 of 50)

Thank you very much. I know that I have issue 74 around and will look for it. You are kind.

butterscotch's picture

(post #67069, reply #26 of 50)

No trouble at all, Marcia.  I hope the article is helpful.

Maedl's picture

(post #67069, reply #17 of 50)

I checked one of my Italian cookbooks from Lucca and found these recipes for cavolo nero. I kept as close to the original language and style as possible in translation.

From Mangiari lucchesi, 2002, Maria Pacini Fazzi Editore, Lucca

Zuppa di Cavolo Nero e Zucca

In a large pot, add 200 grams (about a half pound) of borlotti beans that have been soaked overnight, 50 grams (1/8 pound) of pancetta or bacon, a spoon of oil and salt. When the beans are almost cooked, add two leaves of cavolo nero (I’d add more), which have been chopped into strips the width of a finger. After 15 minutes of cooking, add ¾ pound of cubed pumpkin, which will cook very quickly. Drizzle with olive oil and serve.

The original recipe says it goes well with herring. This may well be true if you like herring!

Zuppa di cavolo nero e fagioli

Cook 350 grams (a bit more than ¾ pound) of borlotti beans that have been soaked overnight with all the seasonings mentioned above. When the beans are done, puree half of them in the water in which they were cooked; reserve the whole cooked beans. When everything is cooking again, add four or five leaves of cavolo nero. Let cook about 30 minutes. Add the rest of the beans (the beans that were not pureed) and bring to a simmer. Serve over slices of grilled bread that have been rubbed with garlic and liberally seasoned with olive oil.

Farinata con cavolo nero*

In plenty of water, cook 300 grams (3/4 pound) beans (borlotti, cannellini, whatever) together with salt, garlic and sage. Pass the cooked beans through a food mill. Cut the leaves of a head of cavolo nero into thin slices and add to the beans. Meantime, sauté 100 grams minced bacon, two or three cloves of garlic, and a diced, ripe tomato together with a bit of hot peppers and add everything to the pot. Let cook for an hour. Add a heaping tablespoon of corn meal for each person being served and stir constantly for about a half an hour. Serve hot with a bit of olive oil.

*NOTE: Farinata is usually a very thin pancake made with chick peas or other legumes and topped with a bit of tomato and other seasonings. I think it’s found mostly from Nice down to Genoa. I have not made this version and haven’t eaten it on any of my Italian trips and I am thinking that perhaps this is to be more the consistency of a porridge than a pancake. The original recipe does not say to add any of the cooking water to the pot after the beans are pureed and the bacon, etc., are added. But I can’t imagine that this mixture could be cooked for an hour without adding some of the cooking liquid—and when the cornmeal is added, without additional stock I think this would produce cement!

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Heather's picture

(post #67069, reply #19 of 50)

The New Mediterranean Diet cookbook has several recipes--

Braised cavolo nero with chestnuts
Kale sautéed with garlic and oil
Tuscan black kale and pork soup
White bean, cavalo nero, and yellow squash soup

Anything sound interesting?

dorcast's picture

(post #67069, reply #21 of 50)

Not Pamilyn, but if Braised Cavolo Nero with Chestnuts is not too much trouble. I'd love to see it.

Heather's picture

(post #67069, reply #23 of 50)

Here it is. My scanner is on strike today.

Braised Cavolo Nero with Chestnuts
From New Mediterranean Diet Cookbook (6-8)

24 fresh chestnuts
1 med onion, diced
2 T extra-virgin olive oil
2 oz slab bacon, diced (opt)
1 C chicken stock
2 ½ pounds cavolo nero (also called lacinto or Tuscan kale)
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Preheat the oven to 350F.
Cut a cross on the rounded side of the chestnuts, through the peel and into the flesh. Roast on a sheet pan for about 15 min. until they have burst open.
Remove from oven and peel, making sure you get all the inner skin off.

In a large pan, cook the onion in the oil until soft but not brown. Add the bacon and cook until it starts to render its fat, about 5 minutes. Add the peeled chestnuts, Raise heat to medium and stir to coat the chestnuts with oil. When the pan is hot, add the stock, cover pan, lower heat and cook 20 to 35 minutes until the chestnuts are tender but still firm.

Meanwhile, clean the kale, cut away hard stems. Cut the kale into ½” slivers. Rinse it carefully.

Cook the kale in a large pan in the water that clings to the leaves. Add a little more boiling water if necessary. Cook until very tender, about 20 minutes.

Combine cooked kale and chestnuts and all the cooking juices. Cook rapidly over med-high heat, stirring frequently, until juices are reduced. Check seasoning. A few drops of lemon juice can be added.

dorcast's picture

(post #67069, reply #24 of 50)

Thanks!
I love all the ingredients. Of course, I'll be opting in for the optional bacon.

Heather's picture

(post #67069, reply #25 of 50)

Seriously, how can bacon ever be optional?

wonka's picture

(post #67069, reply #41 of 50)

I like the Finecooking Gratin of Wintergreens made with kale. I usually double the recipe and cook it in a big pan. I can eat a ton of it.

roz's picture

(post #67069, reply #42 of 50)

The lettuce in my garden has about two or three meals left. Then what to do? I have about ten kale plants that are on steroids! I'm going to use the kale for salads...cook the kale in boiling, salted water, rinse in cold and use as a salad green. Put a vinaigrette or a caesar dressing, or a yoghurt dressing on top. Not the same as a fresh green salad, but it is green! Add some cut tomatoes, cheese or nuts. We'll get by until the cabbages are heads and I make slaw.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Maedl's picture

(post #67069, reply #44 of 50)

Is it too late to plant more lettuce? They are still selling plugs of lettuce in the markets here. It's too depressing to think that we're almost at the end of the growing season!

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Gretchen's picture

(post #67069, reply #45 of 50)

Lettuce and such are cool weather crops.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Maedl's picture

(post #67069, reply #46 of 50)

I know they're cool weather crops--but we've already had a low of 4 degrees C., so our warm days are limited and the hours of sunlight decrease very quickly. We've got lettuce plugs available here, but I'm wondering if Roz would have them, since I think she's north of where I am.

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Gretchen's picture

(post #67069, reply #47 of 50)

I was ONLY suggesting it still might work for you. Sorry.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Maedl's picture

(post #67069, reply #48 of 50)

I didn't mean to be snippy --it would work here--that's why I said the plugs were still being sold in our market. And I think Roz is in a slightly milder climate zone than I am (700 m. altitude and surrounded by high mountains) and I was surprised to hear that lettuce is almost over for the season there.

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
roz's picture

(post #67069, reply #49 of 50)

Yes, I could plant some lettuce seeds, maybe mache would be a good one. Unfortunately we have had a ton of rain and the garden is nearly a swimming pool! I'm more worried about where I'm going to plant next year's garlic and spring cabbage...or if. With climate change, or whatever one calls it, the growing season here is deeply hampered. Three years of nearly constant rain and I think it is time for a poly-tunnel...or a change of address!

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Maedl's picture

(post #67069, reply #50 of 50)

We, too, had a lot of rain this summer, but finally, beginning with 15 August, the balance switched in favor of sunshine and warmth. I don't know how long it will last, but I'm hoping we'll have a good autumn.

Our weather here is all over the map. One winter we have snow piled up over my head, the next winter scarcely any snow at all. That doesn't help the ski industry here! And our glacier on the Zugspitze is disappearing, despite efforts to save it.

I don't think we can run away from this--no matter where you go, the climate is changing, and not for the better.

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Heather's picture

(post #67069, reply #43 of 50)

This was one of Michael Chiarello's dishes that the judges loved on Top Chef Masters--

5 Onion Cavalo Nero:

2 cups leek whites, small diced
2 cups scallion whites, sliced
2 cups shallot, small diced
2 cups red onion, small diced
2 cups yellow onion, small diced
2 cups carrot, grated
Extra virgin olive oil
1/2 cup golden raisins
1 case black cabbage, chiffonade

Directions

Slowly sweat all onions and carrot in olive oil. Add raisins, sweat briefly. Add cabbage and cook slowly stirring frequently until cooked very soft. This will take a two hours.