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Giving fennel one last go

Syrah's picture

before I conclude that I just don't like it.

I've had it raw in a salad once, and I've also had it in a mixture of marinated grilled vegetables.

So, which recipe should I try?

I believe in champagne...

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Romana's picture

(post #66573, reply #1 of 57)

BH


I also never liked fennel, then I tasted it cooked and I fell in love, and now, years later I eat it raw. This is the Italian way (well, one of the Italian ways):


cut the fennel in strips, put in a pot with about a quarter cup of water, bring to boil, lower flame ad salt and a bit of extra virgin olive oil, cook about 15 minutes until soft. If you like you can ad grated parmesean. delicious!


raw: put lots of fresh lemon juice and salt and evoo. yum.

Gretchen's picture

(post #66573, reply #2 of 57)

The potato fennel gratin? I think it is very recent.

Gretchen

Gretchen
SallyBR1's picture

(post #66573, reply #3 of 57)

Good choice. If she does not like that one, it is hopeless :-)

 


 


It is not gremolita, it is GREMOLATA!!!!

(October 2007)

Syrah's picture

(post #66573, reply #24 of 57)

Is it this one?

http://www.taunton.com/finecooking/recipes/fennel-layered-potatoes-breadcrumbs.aspx?ac=ts&ra=fp

I believe in champagne...

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Gretchen's picture

(post #66573, reply #25 of 57)

I have not tried the recipes. I think it is the fennel potato gratin that someone mentioned above that everyone was raving about--big thread about it.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Syrah's picture

(post #66573, reply #26 of 57)

The search is not being friendly.I can't find a thread.

I believe in champagne...

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

dorcast's picture

(post #66573, reply #27 of 57)

I make this one. Not diet friendly, but soooo good.
One of the few uses for my mandolin.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,,FOOD_9936_30282,00.html

Gretchen's picture

(post #66573, reply #28 of 57)

Sally agreed with my post--maybe she'll say which one was especially good. I think the one I thought looked terrific is the Ina Garten one that Dorcast posted. That was the one I was going to try.

Gretchen

Gretchen
dorcast's picture

(post #66573, reply #4 of 57)

I am making one of my favorite salads today. Arugula, blood orange (any orange would work), fennel, sliced thinly, and black olives. Might throw in some hearts of palm, as I have an open can.

If the taste is too strong for you raw, a gratin, as Gretchen mentioned might be good.
I love the Barefoot Contessa potato fennel gratin.

These recent thread about soup, evolved into a fennel discussion with some good suggestions.

http://forums.taunton.com/tp-cookstalk/messages/?start=Start+Reading+%3E%3E

Of course, there is the possibility that you don't like fennel. But, those of us who love it, probably won't accept that....

Marie Louise's picture

(post #66573, reply #9 of 57)

That is one of my favorite salads as well; I take it frequently for work lunches in the winter. (I like to add some shaved Parmesan on top.)

dorcast's picture

(post #66573, reply #10 of 57)

Yes, shaved parm is the perfect addition. I have a cheese fearing/despising sister (no one knows where she came from!) I am bringing it to her house, so I have to make concessions.

msm-s's picture

(post #66573, reply #47 of 57)

I love the salad too. my version is thin sliced onions, orange sections, whole greek olives and fennel, chopped from bottom to top, drizzle with olive oil an sprinkle with sea salt.

wisekaren's picture

(post #66573, reply #5 of 57)

I'll be interested to hear your report, because I don't care for fennel either. I don't like anything that has even a faint licorice/anise flavor.
Karen

MadMom's picture

(post #66573, reply #7 of 57)

I do not care for licorice at all, but have learned to love cooked fennel.  The chef who teaches cooking classes here uses it quite often (I am not sure he knows how to make a dish without putting fennel or cumin in it!) and it is really quite good.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!


Edited 3/2/2008 9:23 am ET by MadMom

Marcia's picture

(post #66573, reply #8 of 57)

I feel the same way about fennel or anything with an anise flavor, and will be interested, too, in hearing the report.

lacemaker's picture

(post #66573, reply #6 of 57)

I wasn't thrilled with it either but then had it out, sauted in some fashion as I recall but in a nice proportion with other veggies and potatoes. It added a nice flavor but not too heavy. From there I've worked my way up to mixed fresh in salads. It's one of those things that seems to grow on you. 

CulinaryArtist's picture

(post #66573, reply #11 of 57)

Two weeks ago I had a dinner party and served fennel three ways.  Called it a study in fennel.


First was Butternut Squash Fennel Soup, then Shaved Fennel and Apple Salad on bed of Arugula then Shrimp in Braised Fennel/Tomato Sauce.  I had found a fennel ice cream recipe but forgot to put the liner of the Cuisinart Ice Cream Maker back into the freezer last time I used it!! 


The most controversial dish was the salad, 3 out of 5 loved it, one said it was OK and the 5th doesn't generally like salad but ate most of it, probably wouldn't request it to be made for him again.  It was a minor ingredient in the soup but did add some balance to the sweetness.  Everyone loved it with the shrimp.  The recipe calls for you to saute the shrimp and put aside while you assemble the sauce, sauteeing then braising the fennel in the tomatoes, from previous experience at cooking fennel, I felt it would not be long enough and really didn't want to leave the shrimp sitting around that long.  So I made the sauce first, then sauteed the shrimp and combined the two pans for 3 minutes and served.  Really must try the fennel ice cream it used toasted fennel seeds.


 


Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST


http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com

Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST

http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com

Gretchen's picture

(post #66573, reply #12 of 57)

The shrimp recipe does sound interesting. Will you share?  ;o)


Fennel is so expensive here that I want a real "winner".


Gretchen
Gretchen
CulinaryArtist's picture

(post #66573, reply #15 of 57)

Sure here it is, I didn't remember to go to the liquor store for the Pernod so I used Vermouth!  I also sprinkled smoked paprika on the shrimp with the s n p. Not much just a small amount that gave the shrimp a smoky flavor, you could probably make the sauce and grill the shrimp too! I used jumbo--5 per person--big eaters here!!


                     
* Exported from MasterCook *


                Shrimp with Fennel, Tomato & Pernod Sauce


Recipe By     :
Serving Size  : 6     Preparation Time :0:00
Categories    :


  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
  2             pounds  shrimp -- peeled, deveined, rinsed & dried
  1 1/2      teaspoons  kosher salt
     1/2      teaspoon  ground black pepper
     1/2           cup  olive oil
  6               cups  fennel -- thinly sliced
  6             cloves  garlic -- smashed
     1/2           cup  Pernod
  28            ounces  petite-diced tomatoes
  2          teaspoons  fresh thyme -- chopped
     1/2           cup  parsley -- chopped


Sprinkle the shrimp with a scant 1/4 teaspoon salt and pepper. Put a 12 in skillet over med-hi heat for 1 1/2 minutes. Add 2 Tbs of the oil and once is shimmering hot add the shrimp in a single layer. Cook undisturbed until the shrimp browns nicely, about 2 minutes. Flip the shrimp and brown the second side, about 1 1 /2 minutes. Transfer to a large plate. The shrimp should still be a little undercooked.


Reduce the heat to medium. Add the remaining 2 tbs of oil and the fennel and garlic, Sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon salt and cook, tossing often until the fennel is very soft and golden brown in places 6 to 8 minutes.


Carefully add the Pernod it may flame up and cook stirring until all flames die out and Pernod has almost evaporated about 1 minute. Add the tomatoes and their juice, the thyme and half the parsley. Bring to boil and then reduce the heat to gentle simmer and cook for 3 minutes to meld the flavors. Add the shrimp and cook tossing until is's opaque throughout. 1 to 2 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve immediately sprinkled with remaining parsley.


                                    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 353 Calories; 21g Fat (53.2% calories from fat); 32g Protein; 9g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 230mg Cholesterol; 743mg Sodium.  Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 4 1/2 Lean Meat; 1/2 Vegetable; 3 1/2 Fat.



Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0


Also I flamed the vermouth and added some of the fennel fronds for garnish.   Served with toasted orzo w/peas & parmesan.



Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST


http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com


 


edited for bad spelling (peed instead of peeled LOL!!)


Edited 3/2/2008 12:57 pm ET by CulinaryArtist

Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST

http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com

Gretchen's picture

(post #66573, reply #18 of 57)

Thank you. Our DDIL loves shrimp--and this looks like a "special" kind of dish to fix next dinner here. Some other things don't always suit as well!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
CulinaryArtist's picture

(post #66573, reply #20 of 57)

Anytime,


DSIL is pretty basic eater and when I told him what I was making he was supportive and ended up enjoying the shrimp dish immensely.  Hope your DDIL likes it as much.  I'm always pressed to do just plain old beef dishes for him but remembered that he was the one who ate a major portion of the shrimp cocktail I served at Xmas.  So I checked w/DD and she said he loves shrimp anyway it's prepared. 


Happy Cooking!


Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST


http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com

Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST

http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com

Sheri's picture

(post #66573, reply #13 of 57)

There's a recipe from FC #62 that I love, also available online - Sautéed Fennel & Red Onion with Arugula.

Amy's picture

(post #66573, reply #22 of 57)

You beat me to the punch! I definitely recommend the Sautéed Fennel & Red Onion with Arugula is delicious!

Florida2's picture

(post #66573, reply #23 of 57)

One of my favorite recipes is a sea bass with chermoula sauce served on top of braised fennel.


BUt I evenlike a simple steamed fennel with some kosher salt on top. But then again, I love the flavor and texture of fennel, cooked or raw.

Risottogirl's picture

(post #66573, reply #14 of 57)

There is a recipe for braised fennel in one of the Beautiful cookbooks (Italy or Tuscany or France?) that is TDF. Really. Every single person who I have prepared it for has raved about it. Especially those who dislike licorice as I do.

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Heather's picture

(post #66573, reply #17 of 57)

Is it the one in Savoring Italy? We love that one!
There's also a good Jamie Oliver one that's braised with garlic and vermouth.

Syrah's picture

(post #66573, reply #29 of 57)

I would love to see that recipe, if it's okay.

Turns out I do like fennel, when it is combined with cream, gruyere and potatoes. The gratin is really spectacular.

(must go to spin tomorrow though ;-) )

I believe in champagne...

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Risottogirl's picture

(post #66573, reply #30 of 57)

I'll look for it tonight, I don't remember which book, but I know I have it.


I pretty much wing it now, but it is good now and then to look at the original recipe, especially when giving it to someone else.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Risottogirl's picture

(post #66573, reply #31 of 57)

Here it is...and it really isn't that rich, just tastes that way...


FENOUIL A LA NICOISE


 


1 kg fennel bulbs


60 ml olive oil


1 large head garlic, cloves separated but unpeeled


125 ml dry white wine


Salt


 


Trim fennel bulbs (reserving some fronds for garnish) and split bulbs lengthwise.


 


In a large heavy sauté pan, warm the oil over medium low heat. Place the bulbs in the pan, cut sides down, filling the spaces in between with the garlic cloves. Sprinkle generously with salt, cover and cook until the cuts sides are golden brown. Turn the fennel, salt again and brown the other sides the same way (this may take about 30 minutes).


 


Uncover, pour half the wine over and shake the pan gently. When the liquid comes to a boil, turn the fennel back over to the flat sides, cover and braise gently for about an hour, adding more wine in small amounts when needed. When the fennel is done it will be meltingly tender, with juices that are brown and syrupy.


 


Garnish with chopped fennel fronds and serve.


 


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Syrah's picture

(post #66573, reply #32 of 57)

Oooooh thankyou, it looks really good.

I believe in champagne...

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie