NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading
CBirck's picture

I have the unusual good fortune of having a beautiful huge, healthy basil plant in my herb garden.  Normally I don't have such good luck with basil.  I want to use it prior to it "bolting" on me.  I've drawn a blank on recipes to use it in.  Any favorites out there?  I can only think of pesto, if I do that, will it freeze?  I'd love to use it fresh in something.

Heather's picture

(post #65632, reply #1 of 64)

Lucky you! If you keep pinching out the new growth it won't bolt for a long time.
The leaves are great added to an herb salad, tossed in pasta, etc. Pesto freezes very well--make lots.

dicus's picture

(post #65632, reply #2 of 64)

You can pick the leaves and freeze them. To use them in a recipe as fresh take them out and crumble frozen into dish. If you let them thaw before addition they get mushy. You can also chop fine and put them in icecube trays with water and freeze. When you want a little basil, toss in a cube or two.

Adele's picture

(post #65632, reply #3 of 64)

Another vote for pesto.  I'm not having much luck with basil this year, pinched and everything.  I know we haven't had a lot of rain, but it's in a place I water every other day.  (Except today it rained a little bit today, not much where the fires are though)


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

Ricks503's picture

(post #65632, reply #4 of 64)

Another vote for pinching off the flowers when they start to for.  Also, when harvesting the basil, cut the stem off down to the, but still leaving the bottom 2 leaves - this, along with pinching off the flowers will encourage it to bush out and not bolt.

1 - measure the board twice, 2 - cut it once, 3 - measure the space where it is supposed to go        4 - get a new board and go back to step 1

 

 

" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

Gretchen's picture

(post #65632, reply #5 of 64)

Hey, it won't near "bolt". You just must keep it picked.  Even if you don't use it, keep it picked.  "Bolting" is when the cooler weather herbs like dill and cilantro, in our part of the country, go to seed basically before the fronds are even ready. Basil doesn't do that, unless you don't keep it picked before it blooms.

Gretchen

Gretchen
schnitzel's picture

(post #65632, reply #6 of 64)

I haven't even planted my basil yet, usually waiting until mid-June. LOL Anyway, once in the garden, I keep it well trimmed for 3 to 4 months before the frost kills it. I learned a simple method from Ellen Ogden (Cook's Garden) that works great. The plant looks a little bare for a few days, but grows back quickly and bushier. I'll scan a page to show the illustration... easier than trying to explain.


PreviewAttachmentSize
basil_pruning.jpg
basil_pruning.jpg54.99 KB
Jean's picture

(post #65632, reply #7 of 64)

Thanks for that.  I got right up and pruned the plants I'm growing indoors on my windowsill. They are starting to flower after being babied along all winter. Now my hands and house smells sooooo good. :)



Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.  Will Rogers


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
TracyK's picture

(post #65632, reply #8 of 64)

Last summer I used Jillsifer's suggestion of making pesto from my abundance of basil, and it's worked beautifully! Just chuck a whole bunch of leaves in the food processor, and process with olive oil until it's a nice, smooth paste. You can add your garlic at this point, but don't add the cheese and nuts. Scoop your puree into muffin cups and freeze, then store in ziploc bags. When you want pesto, take out a puck or two, thaw it, and process in your nuts and cheeses of choice. Tastes summer-fresh all winter long, and VERY convenient for quick meals!


Why is it so cold on this beach? And what's taking the bartender so long?

Marcia's picture

(post #65632, reply #9 of 64)

I do this and it adds great flavor to dishes other than pesto. Try some in a rice pilaff, for instance. Mine is frozen in ice cube trays, so yours might be a little large for this purpose.

Jean's picture

(post #65632, reply #10 of 64)

Muffin cups! Great idea, but I'm going with the mini-muffin cups this summer.  Thanks for the inspiration.




Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.  Will Rogers


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
CBirck's picture

(post #65632, reply #11 of 64)

All great tips!  I wouldn't have thought of freezing prior to adding the nuts and cheese.  Excellent idea.


Edited to say:  Thanks again to this board's advice, I will be using my new FoodSaver for storing in the freezer.  No more freezer burn!   P.S. Gretchen, you were right, for my purposes, the least expensive model, sans canisters and all other do-dad's fits my kitchen needs perfectly!


Edited 5/10/2006 10:36 am ET by CBirck

Ricks503's picture

(post #65632, reply #12 of 64)

The only 2 Foodsaver cannisters I use regularly are the large round one  and that I use for storing nuts so they do not go bad. and the marinating square one - I find that marinating in it takes 1/3 the amount of time of just leaving the meat sit in the marianade in the fridge.


I use it a lot for things like cheese and meats.  I also have a small cannister that I keep my extra instant yeast in in the freezer.


1 - measure the board twice, 2 - cut it once, 3 - measure the space where it is supposed to go        4 - get a new board and go back to step 1

 

 

" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

Gretchen's picture

(post #65632, reply #13 of 64)

Have just packed up all the canisters and hoses to send to DD's friend who got a great deal on the big FS at Tuesday Morning. Glad to be rid of it and get some space back.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Memsahib's picture

(post #65632, reply #25 of 64)

Can you tell me the model number of the FoodSaver you are happy with? I freeze a lot of things and have often thought of buying one but always decided against it, wondering if it was really all that good and worth the money. Also, could you tell me the size. I have VERY limited cupboard and counter space. Thanks for your help.

To one who shares food it is sugar

To one who eats alone it is a toad

Punjabi Proverb

Gretchen's picture

(post #65632, reply #27 of 64)

There are numerous threads here about those of us who all but bow down and worship our FoodSavers. I have had 3 and prefer the very "plain pipe rack" one that either seals or vacuum seals. It sells for about $50 on Amazon. I have had the one with the canisters, etc. It never worked correctly and I have just sent all the various "stuff" off to DD's friend who bought one at Tuesday Morning.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Memsahib's picture

(post #65632, reply #30 of 64)

Thanks, Gretchen. I will look for the pipe rack kind at Bed Bath & Beyond etc. DH won't allow me to order over the internet as it means giving out a credit card number. Miss a lot of good buys that way, but wives have to do what their husbands want (within reason)....at least my generation!

To one who shares food it is sugar

To one who eats alone it is a toad

Punjabi Proverb

KarenP's picture

(post #65632, reply #31 of 64)

 I don't know that this will help you, but it makes me feel a little better.  Citibank MasterCard, and I hope most card companies, have a service called a virtual account number.  You do use the online access to your credit card account to get one, however.  It's a number that looks exactly like a credit card number down to the 3 digit security code, is not your credit card number, and is cross referenced back to your credit card.  It can be used one time only.  It takes all of a minute to get one, just fill in the information in your credit card company website.  You use the "virtual" number to charge.  The bill shows up on your regular credit card statement.  If you return whatever it is you bought, you use the virtual number to return it and the credit shows up on your regular credit card statement. 
  The only time this has backfired on me was using fandango to get movie tickets.  They required the card with the number used to purchase at the theater.

Memsahib's picture

(post #65632, reply #32 of 64)

Thanks, Karen. Will see if this is something I can arrange.

To one who shares food it is sugar

To one who eats alone it is a toad

Punjabi Proverb

plantlust's picture

(post #65632, reply #33 of 64)

I had the most wonderful basil sorbet in southern France.  Never even thought of basil as a "sweet" before.

Automatic transmission=The Dark Side

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with parsley sauce, goat cheese garlic mashed potatoes, Galena Cellars Niagra grape wine & Pie Boss's apple crumble topped with Ruth & Phil's sour cream/cinnamon ice cream.

KarenP's picture

(post #65632, reply #35 of 64)

I had the most wonderful basil sorbet in southern France.  Never even thought of basil as a "sweet" before.


 I've wanted to try this one.
http://www.napastyle.com/kitchen/recipes/recipe.jsp?recipe_id=488

Jean's picture

(post #65632, reply #37 of 64)

Couldn't that be modified to use your own ice cream to begin with?



Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.  Will Rogers


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
KarenP's picture

(post #65632, reply #40 of 64)

 Absolutely.  I'd probably do that unless I was in some huge hurry.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #65632, reply #41 of 64)

LOVE YOUR TAGLINE!

I despise automatic transmission - hate it, despise it, LOATHE it.

(le sigh)

 


 


"The beauty of a Sally is how neatly she can be divided"
(CookiMonster, Dec 2005)

Adele's picture

(post #65632, reply #47 of 64)

I despise automatic transmission - hate it, despise it, LOATHE it.


Have to ask why?  I'll tell you what, hurt your sciatic nerve and you'll hate/despise/loathe clutches! 


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

plantlust's picture

(post #65632, reply #48 of 64)

Ah  That's why I got my sciatica fixed (my James Bond Czech spy physical therapist - the man CAN'T die, my whole family would be in deep kimchee <g>).

Automatic transmission=The Dark Side

Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with parsley sauce, goat cheese garlic mashed potatoes, Galena Cellars Niagra grape wine & Pie Boss's apple crumble topped with Ruth & Phil's sour cream/cinnamon ice cream.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #65632, reply #49 of 64)

It is like dancing with a brother - no pleasure

 


 


"The beauty of a Sally is how neatly she can be divided"
(CookiMonster, Dec 2005)

ashleyd's picture

(post #65632, reply #50 of 64)

Depends on the quality of the auto 'box (and the brother!)


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Gretchen's picture

(post #65632, reply #46 of 64)

Glenys has posted some herb sorbets in the past.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Memsahib's picture

(post #65632, reply #26 of 64)

Silly me. I should have read further. Didn't realize you were referring to canisters (plastic containers?). Though you were talking about sealing equipment, the kind that takes special bags.

To one who shares food it is sugar

To one who eats alone it is a toad

Punjabi Proverb

Grandma4's picture

(post #65632, reply #14 of 64)

I enjoy all types of basil and usually have plenty for cooking AND I like to keep a bouquet on my kitchen counter.  As others have said keep "pinching".  But you can pick offsmall bouguets and set them on the table or the kitchen counter for a great fragrance and a pretty look.  A few chive stalks  add to the look, especially if they are  in bloom, and a spray of tarragon adds a nice contrast in color and leaf shape.