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pestocat's picture

I'm looking for a recipe using the spice Sumac. Sumac is used in Middle Eastern food. It is red in color and has an unique citrus flavor. Anybody have a favorite recipe out there.

Jean's picture

(post #66100, reply #1 of 42)

You could try this--I never have, but thought it sounded good.


                     
* Exported from MasterCook *


                            Sumac Beetroot Spread


  5 medium  sized beets -- (5 to 6)
  2  shallots -- (2 to 3)
  1  tsp  grated ginger
  1  tbsp  currants or sultanas
  2  tbsp  balsamic vinegar
  1   tsp  sumac
  2   tbsp  Greek yoghurt
                        sea salt -- to taste
                        lemon juice (optional)


Roast beets and shallots in an oven at 375°F for 40 minutes or until the beets are cooked.
Remove tray and allow to cool for 15 minutes.
Peel skin from beetroot and shallots and dice into small pieces.
Place all ingredients in a food processor and pulse until incorporated.
Squeeze some lemon juice on top (optional).


Serve as cracker or toast spread.



                             




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drussell's picture

(post #66100, reply #2 of 42)

Is it from the tree or shrub by that name?

Ozark's picture

(post #66100, reply #7 of 42)

Sumac
Rhus coriaria
Fam: Anacardiaceae





This spice comes from the berries of a wild bush that grows wild in all Mediterranean areas, especially in Sicily and southern Italy, and parts of the Middle East, notably Iran. It is an essential ingredient in Arabic cooking, being preferred to lemon for sourness and astringency. Many other varieties of sumac occur in temperate regions of the world. In North America Rhus glabra is known for its use in the tanning industry and for its medicinal properties. Also in North Americai is the related Rhus toxicodendron (poison ivy) which can cause a severe skin reaction when touched.


"Good judgement comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgement"


 

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drussell's picture

(post #66100, reply #15 of 42)

Thank you, good to know.

avak123's picture

(post #66100, reply #3 of 42)

I love sumac and pomegranate molasses with lamb.


For a quick and easy dinner I will mix a tablespoon of sumac with s & p. Dust lamb chops with the mixture and grill or broil.


I serve with a drizzle (approx. 1 teaspoon) of pomegranate molasses.


Easy and yummy!

JillElise's picture

(post #66100, reply #4 of 42)

Yes! Make a Greek salad, add pita croutons and sumac. It's wonderful.

Jill Elise Vancouver BC

Lee's picture

(post #66100, reply #5 of 42)

Sumac is one of my favorite spices.  I sprinkle it on chicken and fish and use it in tomato/cucumber salads and in fattoush.  A Turkish side dish I love with shish kebobs or other grilled lamb or beef is sumac onions, which is simply very thinly sliced onions (I use Spanish or red onions) tossed with sumac and allowed to sit for a few minutes before serving.   You can use it on almost anything that you would season with lemon.  It's processed with salt, so cut back on salt until you get a feel for how much salt you'll need to add to a dish with sumac.  Equal parts of toasted ground fennel seeds and sumac is great on grilled fish.     

Wolvie's picture

(post #66100, reply #8 of 42)

you sound just like me. :-)


I use aleppo pepper quite a bit as well, and of course, zatar.


It's great in a dry rub for grilled meats, too - especially pork.


I'm going to try those sumac onions.


Edited to finish my last sentence - don't know how it posted before I was done.



 


I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts. - Will Rogers


Edited 2/21/2007 7:16 am ET by Wolvie

 

Lee's picture

(post #66100, reply #13 of 42)

I've been using Aleppo pepper more and more.  I really like the flavor.  


This spice mixture is wonderful sprinkled on fish after cooking.  It's from Ana Sortun's cookbook, Spice.  She calls it Fish Spice.  Despite the rather unappetizing name, it's really very good.  A healthy pinch of toasted orange zest is a good addition to a simple tomato sauce, especially if you're serving it with shrimp or scallops.  I haven't tried that with lime zest.  She also adds about 1/4 teaspoon of toasted zest to homemade mayo.  I haven't tried that either, but I think it would be delicious. 


FISH SPICE


For about 1/2 cup:


6 limes or 3 oranges
1/4 cup sumac
1/4 cup fennel seeds, ground finely
1 teaspoon Aleppo chile pepper


Remove the zest of the limes or oranges with a vegetable peeler, avoiding as much pith as possible.  Place the zest on a baking sheet and tranfer it to a gas oven with just the pilot burning.  Place a wooden spoon in the oven door to hold it open about an inch to allow for gentle heat and air flow.  Let the zest dry overnight.  If you don't have a gas oven,  dry the zest in a cool, dry place for 2 days, then toast it in a 200 degree oven for one minute.  Grind the zest to a powder in the blender or a spice (or coffee) grinder and mix in the remaining ingredients.  Store in a tightly covered container in a cool, dark place for up tp 4 months, or in the freezer.


   

Wolvie's picture

(post #66100, reply #16 of 42)

thanks. :-)

 


I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts. - Will Rogers

 

Astrid's picture

(post #66100, reply #17 of 42)

I've tried sumac once and really liked it. Your recipe sounds so good, I will have to search out where to find the stuff.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
Lee's picture

(post #66100, reply #18 of 42)

I buy it at the Spice House which is close to where I live.  You can order from their website, or from Penzey's or kalustyans.com.  They all carry Aleppo pepper as well. 

Astrid's picture

(post #66100, reply #19 of 42)

I went to Penzey's and ordered several things, including a Turkish rub with sumac, which I've enjoyed before.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
Jean's picture

(post #66100, reply #20 of 42)

I was googling on sumac onions and ran across this..!!!!


(It's 2 medium onions, sliced very thinly and tossed with 1 1/2 tsp of sumac powder according to one recipe book)


http://www.washingtonian.com/articles/restaurants/2952.html




Birthdays are good for you. The more you have, the longer you live.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/


Edited 2/22/2007 7:33 am ET by Jean

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Wolvie's picture

(post #66100, reply #21 of 42)

quite the article - thanks for posting! Those kids sure are lucky, eh? ;-)

 


I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts. - Will Rogers

 

ashleyd's picture

(post #66100, reply #22 of 42)

Surely I can't be the only one that when the see this spice name can't help bringing to mind that woman with the incredible voice, Yma Sumac?


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

MadMom's picture

(post #66100, reply #23 of 42)

Nope - every time I see this thread, I think of her.  Is she still alive?  Her voice was absolutely incredible.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

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ashleyd's picture

(post #66100, reply #24 of 42)

Apparently still going strong and living in LA.


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

MadMom's picture

(post #66100, reply #26 of 42)

Amazing.  I noticed after I posted, when I was googling (that's our motto, isn't it, first post, then google?) that she was born in 1922 and just this past year traveled back to Peru to receive some honor.  Hope I'm still going strong when I'm her age.  Heck, I just hope to be her age someday, LOL.  Of course, I could never hope to come close to her voice.  It was so amazing.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Adele's picture

(post #66100, reply #25 of 42)

When I see the spice name, I itch!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

pamilyn's picture

(post #66100, reply #27 of 42)

What is zatar? I guess I'll google it.

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

evelyn's picture

(post #66100, reply #28 of 42)

http://www.recipezaar.com/65710 Zaatar

pan metron ariston 

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pamilyn's picture

(post #66100, reply #29 of 42)

Thanks!

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

dorcast's picture

(post #66100, reply #30 of 42)

Timely, today's entry on this blog is about Zaatar.
http://chocolateandzucchini.com/
In Israel you get fresh baked pita with Zaatar, it is wonderful.

Lee's picture

(post #66100, reply #31 of 42)

You gardeners might find this particularly interesting.  As others have already said, za'atar is a spice/herb mixture, the ingredients and proportions for which vary widely from country to country and cook to cook, but I remembered reading somewhere that it's also the name of the herb used in the mixture, so I went searching.


According to Jill Norman's wonderful book, Herbs and Spices, it's a type of thyme native to the Middle East.  The botanical name is thymbra spicata which she says is a "dark-leaved, woody shrub, rather like savory" with "showy clusters of purple flowers" making it a great rock-garden plant.  She also says Syrian oregano is sometimes sold as za'atar.


In her book, Spice: Flavors of the Eastern Mediterranean, Ana Sortun (chef at Oleana in Cambridge, Mass.) says "it's a very green type of thyme, though some sources say it's Syrian hyssop, which is an herb very similar to oregano."  She finds fresh za'atar in her local Middle Eastern markets and says it looks more like summer savory, or a cross of marjoram, oregano and thyme.  Based on the photo in Norman's book, I think it looks more like savory or hyssop than anything else.


The za'atar that I buy from The Spice House just lists "thyme" as an ingredient.  I'm going to have to ask what kind of thyme it is. 


 

Wolvie's picture

(post #66100, reply #32 of 42)

you realize I will find this plant now. ;-)


when I do - would you like one?


 


I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts. - Will Rogers

 

Lee's picture

(post #66100, reply #34 of 42)

I figured you would be one who had to find it.  I appreciate your offer and would love to take you up on it, but I have no place to grow anything other than houseplants.  Herbs haven't done very well for me here.  Despite the care and love I lavish on them, they aren't happy about being indoors and tend to show it by pouting and developing nasty habits, like attracting white fly.  Truly ungrateful little sneaks.  A garden is one if the things I miss most since we became cliff dwellers.  :(

pamilyn's picture

(post #66100, reply #35 of 42)

Not Lee, but I would!!

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

Lee's picture

(post #66100, reply #36 of 42)

LOL -- and you're another one I knew would search for it!

Wolvie's picture

(post #66100, reply #33 of 42)

timely - the newest issue of saveur has a beet/sumac salad recipe that looks great.


If i can't find it online, I will type it out and post.


 


I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts. - Will Rogers