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Glenys's picture

I always bake a big batch of cookies to take to the lake on weekends and I'm tired of the usual suspects. Nothing fancy, something everyone, including, dare I say, children might like. The usual include toasted coconut; caramel oatmeal coconut; peanut butter; peanuty peanut cookies;cocoa and coffe mounds, BUT IT WILL NEVER BE chocolate chip, so save your recipes in that department.
I have all sorts of esoteric and odd cookies and biscotti, I want something homey. What do you like? What do your kids and adults like?

madnoodle's picture

(post #65667, reply #1 of 68)

Everyone swoons when I make ginger cookies.  Bonuses are that they are easy, cheap, durable, and don't have any of the usual allergy suspects.


Edited to add that this looks like "my" recipe:


CRACKLE - TOP MOLASSES COOKIES
 


2/3 c. vegetable oil
1 c. sugar
1 egg
1/4 c. molasses
2 1/4 c. flour
2 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. ginger
1/3 c. sugar, set aside


Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In large mixing bowl, combine oil and 1 cup sugar. Add egg, beating well. Add rest of ingredients, except sugar, mixing well. shape dough into small nickel-sized balls. Roll each ball into 1/3 cup sugar. Place far apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Bake for 13 minutes. Cool on rack.


The only difference I can see is that I use between 2 and 2 1/4 cups flour, just til a firm dough forms.



Saskatchewan:  our mountain-removal project is nearly complete.


Edited 5/30/2006 7:18 pm by madnoodle

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Glenys's picture

(post #65667, reply #7 of 68)

They'd be good with tea, coffee or red wine.

madnoodle's picture

(post #65667, reply #10 of 68)

And they make a heckuva ice cream sandwich, if you're so inclined.

Saskatchewan:  our mountain-removal project is nearly complete.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Jean's picture

(post #65667, reply #15 of 68)

The summer my DGS lived with us I had to bake these for him every week. He would have lived on them if I'd let him.


                     
* Exported from MasterCook *


Peter's Favorite Raisin Oatmeal Molasses Cookies Makes 36


  1/2    cup  butter
  1 1/4  cups  sugar
  1/2     cup  molasses
  2       eggs
  1 3/4    cups  flour
  1  teaspoon  salt
  1   teaspoon  baking soda
  1  teaspoon  cinnamon
  2  cups  rolled oats regular or quick
  1 1/2   cups  raisins


In a large bowl beat together shortening, sugar, molasses and eggs.  Sift flour with salt, bk soda and cinnamon.
Add to above mixture, stir in oats and raisins.
Drops by spoonsful on greased sheet. (I used parchment)


Bake @ 375° for 10-12 Min.


I mixed this up in the evening, refrigerated the dough and baked them in the morning.


 


                                   




My mother's menu consisted of two choices: Take it or leave it.

- Buddy Hackett

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Glenys's picture

(post #65667, reply #18 of 68)

Wow if that isn't a farmhouse kind of cookie, I don't know what is. Potassium from the molasses, the oatmeal and raisins. I'm sending this one to my mom and she'll test it on the ultimate cookie monster, DAD!
Never met a cookie he didn't like but has lots to say about all of them.
I could reverse that and it would still work.

madnoodle's picture

(post #65667, reply #19 of 68)

If you're looking for homey I should dig out my recipe for Lutherans.  The original name is something inspirational like "drop cookies", but since the recipe originated in the Lutheran Ladies Aid cookbook, they became Lutherans.  When I make additions or substitutions DH labels them as either Reformed or Evangelical Lutherans.  They're yummy--oatmeal, dates, nuts.  They're the official fishing trip cookie for DH and friends, which reminds me I should be making some, since they're going after the big ones next week. 

Saskatchewan:  our mountain-removal project is nearly complete.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

DeannaS's picture

(post #65667, reply #45 of 68)

You're going to laugh, but our "traditional" road trip cookie is now an oatmeal chocolate chip cookie with a suprise ingredient - curry powder.

It all happened like this - I bought some curry powder in bulk from our local food coop, and just happened to have a vintage cinnamon tin to put it in. My roommate made cookies (she's not a baker) and grabbed the "cinnamon" from the cupboard. It was a reddish curry, so she didn't even notice the difference. Everyone raved about the cookies and kept saying, "what's that subtle flavor?" When she got back from her road trip, she was telling me what a hit they were and she said it must have been really good cinnamon or something. I said, "um...which cinnamon did you use?" :)

But, we still make them that way. People love them. Go figure.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

madnoodle's picture

(post #65667, reply #59 of 68)

Jean, these are delicious!  I baked a batch this morning, and between all the dough I ate and (oh darn) the wrecked ones that I had to eat, I didn't get nearly the suggested yield.  I did find them really sticky--even stuck to parchment, which I thought was impossible.  I had to shift the whole sheet of parchment to a rack to cool before I could peel them off.  Do you use blackstrap or fancy molasses for these?  I thought about it for a while, and then went with fancy for no real reason.

Saskatchewan:  our mountain-removal project is nearly complete.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Jean's picture

(post #65667, reply #61 of 68)

Glad you liked them.  I use Grandma's original unsuphered molasses.





My mother's menu consisted of two choices: Take it or leave it.

- Buddy Hackett

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
madnoodle's picture

(post #65667, reply #62 of 68)

Hmmm, here our choices are blackstrap, cooking, or fancy.  I wonder which is closest to Grandma's.  I wouldn't mind experimenting.

Saskatchewan:  our mountain-removal project is nearly complete.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Syb's picture

(post #65667, reply #63 of 68)

Well, it's not blackstrap.  That stuff is good for healthy cooking, but not for good taste.  It took me years to get rid of almost two gallons of blackstrap.  Now I buy Grandma's.  It's delicious.  I could eat it by the spoonful.

madnoodle's picture

(post #65667, reply #66 of 68)

I used to find blackstrap repulsively harsh, but the more I use it, the more I like it.  It does need to go in heartier foods (bread for instance)--not so good in cookies and gingerbread.


Saskatchewan:  our mountain-removal project is nearly complete.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Syb's picture

(post #65667, reply #68 of 68)

During my blackstrap molasses phase, I was regularly baking whole wheat bread.  That's probably where most of it ended up.  I was so relieved when I used the last of it.  There are probably different grades of blackstrap.  This was a 5 gallon bucket I split with two other families. 

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #65667, reply #64 of 68)

Sigh, I miss Grandma's molasses.

I think fancy comes closest to the taste, but Canadian molasses is stronger than American. I was recently contracted to do some recipe testing. A lot of the recipes called for molasses, and all of them tasted unbalanced when made with the Canadian stuff.

Glenys's picture

(post #65667, reply #65 of 68)

Yes, we're ready for a more potent syrup.

madnoodle's picture

(post #65667, reply #67 of 68)

Well then, my instincts were good.

Saskatchewan:  our mountain-removal project is nearly complete.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

TracyK's picture

(post #65667, reply #2 of 68)

Nothing says homey like a snickerdoodle (plus they have a goofy name).


There's also a lovely recipe for old-fashioned oatmeal cream pies somewhere around here that is lovely... fluffy creamy filling sandwiched between moist & chewy oatmeal cookies.


Why is it so cold on this beach? And what's taking the bartender so long?

elizaram's picture

(post #65667, reply #3 of 68)

The Martha Stewart Holiday Baking magazine from last year has a great recipe for snickerdoodles. The Rosemary Butter Cookies from that issue are also excellent.


A couple of others I get requests for over and over are the Double Ginger Cookies from FC#75, and Clove Snaps from FC#61. The English shortbread from the latter issue is also very good.


As for kid friendliness, my 4 year old could eat himself sick on any of the above. :-) I can post recipes if you are interested.


I haven't made the brownies from the latest FC yet, but from the raves they have been getting around here, they might be another candidate.




Congress [is] a massive organism that, amazingly, functions without a spine. --Patt Morrison, LA Times



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

Glenys's picture

(post #65667, reply #5 of 68)

I could make the snickerdoodles and put sundried cranberries in them.

Glenys's picture

(post #65667, reply #6 of 68)

Sorry, no brownies, no chocolate chip cookies. After childhood I could never face another brownie and since childhood I've never liked chocolate chip cookies.

schnitzel's picture

(post #65667, reply #28 of 68)

Another vote for those Double Ginger Cookies.


Glenys's picture

(post #65667, reply #4 of 68)

What's the filling? Can they sit on the counter in a tin? If it's icing it's a no-go.

TracyK's picture

(post #65667, reply #32 of 68)

Darnit, I can't seem to locate the recipe. Grr. IIRC, it wasn't an icing per se, and my former roommate kept them in a tin on the counter. They didn't last two days. :-)


They reminded me of a much yummier version of those ghastly packaged gooey oatmeal creme pies that I used to adore as a child.


I'll email my roommate and find out where she got the recipe.


Why is it so cold on this beach? And what's taking the bartender so long?

Glenys's picture

(post #65667, reply #33 of 68)

When you discover the mystery of the filling, let us know.

Ellen H's picture

(post #65667, reply #8 of 68)

How about a thumbprint cookie? Or rugelach? Do you like a fruity jammy note in your cookies? My family goes nuts for crumbly shortbready cookies with tart apricot or berry jam in them. What a wonderful "problem" you have!


Cheers!

Glenys's picture

(post #65667, reply #11 of 68)

I not a rugelach fan but I do like thumbprint cookies. Usually I try to get more fruit or cereal or nut butter value in them. It's the charade of a at least a little redemption.

RuthWells's picture

(post #65667, reply #9 of 68)

I love the egg white/ground almond cookie from Paris Sweets.  It is very unassuming in appearance and irresistable in flavor and texture.  I added cinnamon to the batter and painted the bottoms with tempered choc and everyone swooned.  I'll post the recipe if you don't have the book and are interested.


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

Glenys's picture

(post #65667, reply #12 of 68)

Ruth, hate to tell you but like Meanie, I'm not an egg girl. No meringue, but thank-you.

RuthWells's picture

(post #65667, reply #29 of 68)

They're not actually meringue-y -- just a a bit chewy.  The technique sounds a bit like a French macaron, but they turn out quite different. 

Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

chiquiNO's picture

(post #65667, reply #14 of 68)

YUMM I'd love that recipe!!

Chiqui from way down yonder in New Orleans