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Chicken, rice, and ?????

Gretchen's picture

Well, I was going to suggest a little onion and maybe frozen peas, but those chicken breasts need to be cooked and diced, or  you're going to need some chicken broth too.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Gretchen's picture

(post #66843, reply #1 of 94)

Then I would put the chicken, rice, some onion, herbs (basil,bit of thyme), soup, more mushrooms if you can, cup of Uncle Ben's rice (preferably), good shake of black pepper, and a cup of chicken broth in a casserole dish. Cover and bake at 350* for an hour. Check to see if the rice is done and the liquid absorbed. If not, uncover and bake a little longer.


Gretchen


Edited 11/25/2008 9:09 am ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
StevenHB's picture

(post #66843, reply #19 of 94)

Uncle Ben's?


Maybe we'll find direction, around some corner, where it's been waiting to meet us.


Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible

Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible
Gretchen's picture

(post #66843, reply #21 of 94)

It is just foolproof rice--cooks up nicely and never "glumphs". Needless to say, I am not talking about instant.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Risottogirl's picture

(post #66843, reply #31 of 94)

Uncle Ben's??


Absolutely. Not  the instant, silly, just the regular long grain. It was the ONLY rice used at le Cordon Bleu in Paris, when I did my time there many years ago. Perfect pilaf every time. I suspect it was the only American product they used in the kitchens there. LOL


BTW, we also used it at several of the restaurants I worked at in France, including one 3 star (Michelin) in Paris.


I still buy it in the 5 lb bag (among many other types of rice of course!).


 



Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay



Edited 12/10/2008 1:49 pm ET by Risottogirl

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Gretchen's picture

(post #66843, reply #32 of 94)

I am SO glad to see you say this. I thought you were one of the several naysayers here. And Julia recommended it for her paella.


It is a no-brainer for perfect rice every time.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Jean's picture

(post #66843, reply #35 of 94)

One of my DF who has always considered herself the queen of the kitchen just went gaga over the steamed rice I served a while back.       It dawned on me later that I had used the Uncle Ben's. I never did set her straight about that one. I always wondered if she went out and bought herself a rice cooker. :)



Give thanks to the LORD , for he is good;  his love endures forever.



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A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
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Gretchen's picture

(post #66843, reply #36 of 94)

Ain't it GREAT!!  LOL

Gretchen

Gretchen
Risottogirl's picture

(post #66843, reply #38 of 94)

I grew up with a rice cooker, loooong before they were readily available here (my Dad brought it from Japan) and we only used Uncle Ben's in it.


I grew up not realizing that there were other ways to cook rice...like in a pan on top of the stove, LOL.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

evelyn's picture

(post #66843, reply #47 of 94)

It is also the only rice I use for my pilafs. Consistently best long-grain I can find in Greece.

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
StevenHB's picture

(post #66843, reply #33 of 94)

I don't understand what's so hard about cooking regular rice.  I've gotten to the point where I just dislike the flavor.  It's "off" somehow.


Maybe we'll find direction, around some corner, where it's been waiting to meet us.


Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible

Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible
Risottogirl's picture

(post #66843, reply #37 of 94)

I guess it depends on what you consider "regular" rice. Uncle Ben's WAS regular rice in my family! Have you ever tried it?


It is not "instant" rice that I am talking about - the same amount of time and /or technique is used as for any non-instant long grain rice.  I prefer to cook rice in the french pilaf fashion but it  also cooks normally on the stove or in the rice cooker (which is all we had as a child - my Dad( a well traveled sea captain) brought it from Japan before they were available or fashionable here). 


Believe me if there was a longer, or harder, or more labor intensive way to do something, le Cordon Bleu and the french in general would have figured it out LOL. Fort the LCB to use any AMERICAN product, it has to be good...no, wait, it has to be perfect :)



Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay



Edited 11/25/2008 9:33 pm ET by Risottogirl

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

StevenHB's picture

(post #66843, reply #48 of 94)

I grew up on Uncle Ben's, too.  These days I find that it has an unpleasant flavor.  There's not much else that I can say about it.



Maybe we'll find direction, around some corner, where it's been waiting to meet us.


Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible

Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible
Marcia's picture

(post #66843, reply #54 of 94)

I grew up with Uncle Ben's and use it still for some things, but it cooks perfectly. Of course, nobody ever followed the box directions. My mom cooked it by the pasta method and I simply use less liquid than the box advises. ;-)

BossHog's picture

(post #66843, reply #55 of 94)

What exactly is the "pasta method"?

Just trying to learn something...

You never can tell with bees [Winnie the Pooh]



Marcia's picture

(post #66843, reply #56 of 94)

You boil a big pot of water, salt it, and cook the rice until just done by tasting. Drain in a colander when done, just like pasta. :)

I might not have been clear -- after the water comes to a boil, salt it and add the rice. Then proceed as directed above.


Edited 11/26/2008 10:00 am ET by Marcia

BossHog's picture

(post #66843, reply #57 of 94)

Thanks for the info. I've never heard of cooking rice that way.

It's hard for me to get rice cooked just right in a pan. I'll try this and see if it works better.

The peacekeeper's meeting tonight has been cancelled due to a conflict



MadMom's picture

(post #66843, reply #58 of 94)

I've heard of it, but haven't tried it.  Those who do seem to swear by it.  Sure beats measuring, doesn't it?



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BossHog's picture

(post #66843, reply #59 of 94)

"Sure beats measuring, doesn't it?"

Well, I don't really know yet.

(-:

You're not bothering me. It's way beyond that



Jean's picture

(post #66843, reply #60 of 94)

I usually just 'knuckle' it. Rice in pot, cover with water to your first knuckle above the rice. Add salt, bring to a simmer, time it for 20 minutes. Perfect. Fluff with fork. Serve.


 




Give thanks to the LORD , for he is good;  his love endures forever.



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Glenys's picture

(post #66843, reply #80 of 94)

I don't like the method, unless the perpetrator pays attention to the cooking time. Otherwise the rice is overcooked and broken.

Marcia's picture

(post #66843, reply #63 of 94)

It's actually a very old method that was used frequently in old rice-growing parts of the country, which is where I grew up -- Savannah, to be exact, but the same used to be done in Charleston and environs.

You need to be careful not to overcook and drain well. Good luck.

Gretchen's picture

(post #66843, reply #64 of 94)

When I first moved South with DH I REALLY had to learn to cook rice--and did it that way. We rarely had rice, and it was not a happy dish in my cooking repertoire--sticky gummy mass.


I have in recent years had great results with basmati, thanks to this board, and like it a lot.  And I can cook regular long grain, and even risotto to my liking. But UB's is what I really like all the way around--taste. texture and ease.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #66843, reply #65 of 94)

Basmati rice is my first choice nowadays -- I love the taste and texture, but for some things like Arroz con Pollo, I use Uncle Ben's because I like it reheated best, and UB's holds up to that without getting mushy. It's heresy, because medium grain is traditional, but what the heck -- we like it.

My father's maternal forebears were from the Charleston/Savannah area, and rice was on our table almost every day. It was a given, and I still love it in many forms.

Gretchen's picture

(post #66843, reply #66 of 94)

I even have some Carolina Gold rice on my shelf. Talk about finicky to fix!!


I fixed some "basmati" rice several years ago, and I think it was a Lundberg rice. It tasted and smelled like popcorn!! And I hated it. Took all that time to find out it really doesn't.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #66843, reply #68 of 94)

I used to order Carolina Gold but decided it wasn't worth the price.

knitpik's picture

(post #66843, reply #71 of 94)

There are all kinds of basmati - some extra long and some shorter
grain and anything in between. And they all taste different.
When I was home my mam told me she found out what brand the restaurant
use and that's what she buys. It's not even advertised. Here I bought
a bag of Taldi and really liked it.
It's funny but when I was a kid I hated basmati. I found it tasted
dusty (even after several rinse). Maybe it's the type of rice that was
available at that time.

Gretchen's picture

(post #66843, reply #72 of 94)

Mine is from Costco, and marked "aged" which Glenys ( I think) said was good. I am not a connieseur (sp) but have enjoyed the nutty flavor. That first one was like a movie theater. We love popcorn, but not with Chinese.

Gretchen

Gretchen
knitpik's picture

(post #66843, reply #74 of 94)

I don't think I've seen rice at our Costco. Will have to look.

Gretchen's picture

(post #66843, reply #75 of 94)

Look for the 25# bag!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
knitpik's picture

(post #66843, reply #76 of 94)

I'd be very surprised to find any bag of rice there but will look.