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Egg Info

Frankie's picture

Egg Info (post #57146)

in

I read ALL of this on http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2007/11/08/what-are-the-best-type-of-eggs-to-get.aspx

"Mother Earth News recently finished their latest egg-testing project, confirming their 2005 test results that showed true free-range eggs are far more nutritious than commercially raised eggs.

Compared to official U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) nutrient data for commercial eggs, eggs from hens raised on pasture may contain:

1/3 less cholesterol
1/4 less saturated fat
2/3 more vitamin ####2 times more omega-3 fatty acids
3 times more vitamin E
7 times more beta carotene
These dramatically differing nutrient levels are most likely the result of the differences in diet between free-range pastured hens, vs. commercially farmed hens.

Without citing any research of their own, most egg industry advocates hold fast to their claim that commercially farmed eggs are no different from pastured eggs, and that hens’ diets do not alter their eggs nutritional value in any significant way.

Mother Earth News points out the flawed and downright fraudulent definitions of “true free-range.” The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) defines “free-range” as chickens that have “access to the outside.” However, it does not define their diets, nor whether or not the “outside access” is to a cement courtyard or a field fit for foraging.

Sources:
Mother Earth News October/November 2007

Which Eggs to Buy, and Which You Should Avoid

Additionally, I would STRONGLY encourage you to AVOID ALL omega-3 eggs, as they are actually LESS healthy for you. Typically, the animals are fed poor-quality sources of omega-3 fats that are already oxidized. Also, omega-3 eggs do not last anywhere near as long as non-omega-3 eggs. Remember, omega- 3 eggs are highly perishable and should be avoided.

If you have to purchase your eggs from a commercial grocery store, I would advise getting free-range organic. Ideally, if at all possible it would be far preferable to purchase your eggs directly from your local farmer, because this way you can be certain of the quality. This may not be as hard as you think. In my experience, this is one of the easiest foods to find from local farmers.

It is also wise to NOT refrigerate your eggs. If you have ever been to Europe or South America and gone into the grocery stores, you will know that this practice of non-refrigeration is common in those countries.

How to Eat Your Eggs for Maximum Health Benefits

Eggs are often one of your most allergenic foods, but I believe this is because they are cooked. If you consume your eggs in their raw state, the incidence of egg allergy virtually disappears. Heating the egg protein actually changes its chemical shape, and the distortion can easily lead to allergies.

It is my belief that eating eggs raw helps preserve many of the highly perishable nutrients such as lutein and zeaxanthin, which are powerful prevention elements of the most common cause of blindness: age-related macular degeneration.

Fresh raw egg yolk tastes like vanilla. It can be eaten “Rocky style,” combined with avocado or in a shake with whey protein powder, raw kefir, or a small amount of berries. However, egg protein is easily damaged on a molecular level, even by mixing/blending. If you choose not to eat your eggs raw, cooking them soft-boiled would be your next best option.

Scrambling your eggs is one of the worst ways to eat eggs as it actually oxidizes the cholesterol in the egg yolk. If you have high cholesterol this may actually be a problem for you as the oxidized cholesterol may cause some damage in your body."

Frankie


Flay your Suffolk bought-this-morning sole with organic hand-cracked pepper and blasted salt.
Thrill each side for four minutes at torchmark haut. Interrogate a lemon.
Embarrass any tough roots from the samphire. Then bamboozle till it's al dente with that certain je ne sais quoi.

Arabella Weir as Minty Marchmont - Posh Nosh


Flay your Suffolk bought-this-morning sole with organic hand-cracked pepper and blasted salt. Thrill each side for four minutes at torchmark haut. Interrogate a lemon. Embarrass any tough roots from the samphire. Then bamboozle till it's al dente with that certain je ne sais quoi.

Arabella Weir as Minty Marchmont - Posh Nosh


roz's picture

(post #57146, reply #1 of 8)

Thanks for the egg info Frankie. I often have a raw egg in my smoothie, it seems to add body and I can't even tell there is an egg there. We try to eat free range, not sure that it is organic free range, as we get most of our eggs from young Ben and his hens! The season is slowly winding down.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Tish's picture

(post #57146, reply #2 of 8)

I wonder about that advice to keep eggs at room temperature. One difference between US Eggs and EU eggs is that in the US eggs must be washed before sale and in the EU they may not be washed before sale (except in Sweden). The washing process removes the waxy cuticle that protects the egg, so in the US eggs no longer have their natural protection when we purchase them.

I very much prefer to store in the fridge and take them out to come up to room temperature before cooking.

madnoodle's picture

(post #57146, reply #6 of 8)

The only time I've ever had food poisoning was from eggs stored at room temperature.  It was almost 20 years ago, but I remember it VERY clearly.  I always keep my eggs in the fridge.

I believe in compost.


 

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

gmunger's picture

(post #57146, reply #3 of 8)

Right now our hens are on a steady diet of grasshoppers, cantelope rinds, and tomato skins. Didn't do a nutritional analysis but I can attest that my breakfast overeasys were mighty tasty.


The trouble with having real eggs is, when I go out for breakfast I now tend to order the pancakes. Gut bombs, those.


 


We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.
cucarets's picture

(post #57146, reply #4 of 8)

I'd love to see some citations for: 1: Cooked eggs can be bad for you 2: Eggs in a blender lose some of their nutritional value. Thanks... cucarets

cucarets's picture

(post #57146, reply #5 of 8)

I've been googling for the past half hour and so far I have found conflicting positions on raw vs cooked eggs: http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/full/128/10/1716 &#10

;

The jury is also still out on blended eggs versus "whole". There is no authoritative literature that I can find on this issue.

"Protein chains are pretty small in comparison to a blender blade... not to mention in order for your body to process amino acids they must be in the form of tri peptides, di peptides or singular amino acids... if anything a blender may help increase the speed of digestion, but its certainly not gonna denature protein in any respect..." http://tinyurl.com/6y8d3z &#10

;

Most critics agree that eggs at room temperature, especially if the eggs have been washed, isn't a good idea, though egg washing itself is a bad idea. Europeans have colder room temps than Americans, and so can leave their eggs at room temperature with less risk of spoilage. It's obvious that the colder the egg the less risk of it going off.

JillElise's picture

(post #57146, reply #7 of 8)

When I was a kind, my folks had a friend from Japan and she'd make us Sukiyake (I think my spelling is wrong, but you get the drift, I hope) and would serve us a raw egg in our bowl to eat with it. I loved that, and still do eat it this way.

assibams's picture

(post #57146, reply #8 of 8)

Many German stores keep their eggs in fridges, too. But: every carton has a 'refrigerate after' date as well as an expiration date. IIRC you are supposed to refrigerate after 2 weeks.


Resist the temptation to over-clean. After all, how many times do you need to kill the same germ.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright