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Deceptive Ads.

Andy2's picture

Deceptive Ads. (post #57150)

in

It looks like the FDA finally woke up and gave a slap on the wrist of Cheerios maker for outrageous health claims. Every time I watched those ads, I was thinking STOP. To me, it is highly processed artificial food product with very little added nutritional components. 

Glenys's picture

(post #57150, reply #1 of 25)

That's what I say about boxed cereal in general. Unless they lace it with added nutrients, there'd be no value at all. I don't know about where you live but I'm shocked that a box of cereal can cost between $5 and $10, for processed grain products!

Andy2's picture

(post #57150, reply #2 of 25)

I live in Houston which, frequently competes with New Orleans and Detroit for the fattest City. We must chow down plenty of those sugary cereals.

Gretchen's picture

(post #57150, reply #3 of 25)

What did they do. a link?

Gretchen

Gretchen
dorcast's picture

(post #57150, reply #4 of 25)

Florida2's picture

(post #57150, reply #5 of 25)

I agree. I think maybe FDA is starting to become more active. At the same time they slapped Cheerios, they slapped Biogen Idec for marketing Tysabri (for MS) without mentioning the adverse side effects, such as death.


Maybe FDA will actually begin to regulate the industry. What a breath of fresh air.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #57150, reply #6 of 25)

ANd how about these CONSTANT adds at yahoo, showing anti-wrinkle, anti-cellulite, anti-fat creams and pills - all with the same modus operandi: a picture of an old woman, wrinkled as a prune, and a sliding new screen passes over, to show a gorgeous young lady

now they have one with a fat abdominal region shaking like jello - and of course, the "after" is a woman with washboard abs

it makes me furious. Do they really fool anyone? I heard that the free trial offered by some of the anti-wrinkled creams are a huge scam, once you sign up for it, they never stop sending refills, and they cost a fortune. By the time you manage to stop the delivery, they already made all the money they need to.

 


 


The garbage disposal is your friend. Treat it nicely.


(A little pearl of wisdom, February 2009)

Florida2's picture

(post #57150, reply #7 of 25)

Well, as PT Barnum ( I think) said, "There is a sucker born every minute"


Caveat Emptor (sp)--buyer beware :)

MadMom's picture

(post #57150, reply #10 of 25)

My younger DD ordered some acai pills over the net, then tried to stop them.  Took her a couple of months.  Of course, in the fine print, it also said she was signed up for several other things, a web site which helped guide her weight loss and something else.  Took forever to get everything cancelled.  As you said, by the time they finally cancel, they've made their money on the junk.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Jean's picture

(post #57150, reply #11 of 25)

Rod ordered some 'samples' too.  We returned an unordered delivery and contested the charge to o ur card. Hopefully the CC company has them straightened out by next month..our problem was not unique. There were many complaints about that company. I think DH has learned a lesson.


Sometimes I wonder--why is that Frisbee getting bigger?--and then it hits me.



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MadMom's picture

(post #57150, reply #12 of 25)

I contested all the charges (which were on my credit card) and told the cc co. that I had not authorized them.  They sent me a letter wanting to know when I had cancelled them.  How could I cancel something I had not authorized?  Stupid, stupid, stupid.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Florida2's picture

(post #57150, reply #13 of 25)

Its like that question, "When did you stop beating your wife"

MadMom's picture

(post #57150, reply #14 of 25)

Yeah.  The amounts are small, ranging from $1 to $4.95, but it's the principal of the thing.  I just wrote my comment about how could I cancel something I never authorized and sent the whole mess back to Citibank.  Let them worry with it.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

BossHog's picture

(post #57150, reply #8 of 25)

Cheerios ads don't bother me nearly as much as all the bogus drugs that supposedly magically help you lose weight.

Brain cells come and brain cells go, but fat cells live forever.



Lee's picture

(post #57150, reply #15 of 25)

DH and I met with his cardiologist and a dietician yesterday and Cheerios came up, albeit in a humorous way.  It turns out that a serving of Cheerios does provide some nutrients (protein, iron, vitamins) along with 3 grams of soluble fiber, which is believed to be helpful in lowering LDL cholesterol and keeping one's arteries in good shape.  Is it better than a serving of steel cut oats?  Not quite, but it isn't far behind.  A serving of McCann's steel cut Irish oats, which is what we eat, contains 4 grams of soluble fiber, a bit more protein, and I believe it is higher in B vitamins.  The claim that Cheerios will lower your cholesterol hasn't been proven, but who would have guessed that Cheerios really is a lot better for you than most of the sugary cereals on the market? 

TracyK's picture

(post #57150, reply #16 of 25)

but who would have guessed that Cheerios really is a lot better for you than most of the sugary cereals on the market?


Who wouldn't have? It's got very little sugar, it's fortified with vitamins, it contains oat bran, and is actually kind of tasteless. LOL.


Then again, cereal is often very misleading. "Honey Bunches of Oats" and the like is not that much better for you than "Captain Crunch," save a bit of sugar.



"One of the great strengths of the United States is … we do not consider ourselves a Christian nation or a Jewish nation or a Muslim nation. We consider ourselves a nation of citizens who are bound by ideals and a set of values."

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Lee's picture

(post #57150, reply #17 of 25)

You're right.  You really have to educate yourself and read labels if you care about diet and nutrition. 

kathymcmo's picture

(post #57150, reply #18 of 25)

How is your DH feeling? I hope he's all recovered from the procedure and feeling great.

Lee's picture

(post #57150, reply #21 of 25)

He's feeling great and has resumed all normal activites, including strenuous exercise.  He had blood drawn yesterday and we have our fingers crossed that the numbers are better than they were a month ago.  I go back for another test in July and I'm hoping my numbers will have come down enough so that my doc won't recommend that I start taking statins.


We've changed our eating habits in the past 6 weeks.  Nothing really drastic, just cutting back on portion size, limiting meat and chicken to 3 to 4 (cooked) ounces per serving, monitoring total fat intake and cutting out foods high in fats and saturated fats, like desserts (hard for DH) poultry skin (the best part of the bird), cheese (the hardest for both of us) hot dogs and sausages, ribs, etc.  We have both lost 10 pounds, and it wasn't difficult, nor have we felt hungry or deprived (except for cheese and chocolate chip cookies).  We haven't cheated yet, but I think a small pizza is in the near future.  DH should lose another 10 pounds and I'd like to trim another 2 or 3.  He's delighted to be able to get into suits and slacks that he hasn't been able to wear for awhile, and I'm thrilled to be able to tuck in my shirts and wear all of my belts again!


Thanks for asking!  :)       

kathymcmo's picture

(post #57150, reply #22 of 25)

That's so wonderful to hear Lee. And congratulations on the weight loss for you both. It sounds like you're taking really sensible--and sustainable--approach. Good luck with the blood tests.

MadMom's picture

(post #57150, reply #23 of 25)

Fantastic!  Good for you both on the weight loss, and I'll keep my fingers crossed about the numbers.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Florida2's picture

(post #57150, reply #24 of 25)

Congratulations :) I'm glad you are both Feeling Better too, not just looking better :)

Lee's picture

(post #57150, reply #25 of 25)

Neither of us ever felt bad, but I have to say I have more energy than I've had for awhile.  It's probably the increased vitamin D, but whatever it is, I'm liking it.


Thanks everyone for your good thoughts and support!

Florida2's picture

(post #57150, reply #19 of 25)

Somehow, I am suspicious of foods "fortified" by laboratories with nutrients. Getting it straight from the food perhaps is better-- as Pollan points out in Omnivore's Dilemma, one doesnt really know if there are other unknown key ingredients in a real food that makes the nutrient more bioavailable when we eat it, as opposed to when a lab makes it and sprays it on the food.


The image of a lab spraying the nutrients on a food really turned me off to processed cereal.

Lee's picture

(post #57150, reply #20 of 25)

Getting it straight from the food perhaps is better-- as Pollan points out in Omnivore's Dilemma, one doesnt really know if there are other unknown key ingredients in a real food that makes the nutrient more bioavailable when we eat it.


IA with that and, like most of us here, I cook with fresh, whole ingredients.  That said, research has indicated that, in many instances, the body doesn't differentiate between nutrients derived from whole foods or supplements taken in other forms.  In addition, it's not realistic, perhaps not even possible, for some of us to get the required amounts of some vitamins and/or minerals from a normal diet.  I take a multivitamin, calcium, vitamin C, folic acid and vitamin D (I'm otherwise deficient in the latter two) every day in addition to what I get from the foods I eat.  I don't think the amount of vitamins and other nutrients added to a serving of cereal is enough to consider as part of the daily requirement, but it doesn't bother me that it's there.