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schnitzel: Chez Jacques

schnitzel's picture

I have always admired Jacques Pépin, he is my culinary hero.


His latest book is beautiful: Chez Jacques: Traditions and Rituals of a Cook, and it has an eclectic mix of recipes. I will focus on his cooking techniques, work through the book keeping in mind the seasons, and availability of ingredients. 


This will be a fun journey.

Table of contents for Chez Jacques



Edited 10/6/2007 8:18 am ET by schnitzel

Adele's picture

(post #67183, reply #1 of 551)

Totally cool. Hopefully I will have this in the mailbox soon.  My hand is raised already  to do the ones you can't, you can do my Kahlua cake, the sangria, and beach plums!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

schnitzel's picture

(post #67183, reply #2 of 551)

Oh, beach plums! I used to gather them while living near the CT shoreline. They are quite tart, so I made jam. Now I'm wondering what Rose makes with them.


DH is on the wagon so I avoid recipes heavy in alcohol, for him and the boy. Although, I'm still a lush.


I'll see what difficulties I run into along the way with Jacques book. There are good meat and fish markets here and can't wait to ask the butcher for pig snout. 

Then there are the sweetbreads, frog legs, and squab... oh, my.


And I'll be needing a cannelé mold. Just found his Cannelé recipe online.


Also found:
Saucisson of Pork Tenderloin
Fettuccine with Chicken Livers

Just a little tease for those who haven't bought the book yet. ;·)


Gretchen's picture

(post #67183, reply #3 of 551)

Dang, off to find a pork tenderloin.  I'm not sure I can really project the flavor of this, BUT who knows. Cool!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
schnitzel's picture

(post #67183, reply #4 of 551)

It is cool. Please report back if you decide to make it.


Adele's picture

(post #67183, reply #5 of 551)

She makes.......Jam!   Just plums and sugar.  What color does it end up?  I made plum yesterday and it's golden. Used red and black and big and small.  Added a pear and grated an apple too.  Very good, tangy & sweet.


Got the Chez Jacques today and opened pages at random, this will be read cover to cover.  Gorgeous.


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

schnitzel's picture

(post #67183, reply #6 of 551)

The color of the beach plum jam is dark red-purple to slightly brownish. Its strong flavor is unique, quite distinct, and somewhat astringent. Just a bit haunting. LOL


Have you been able to find rabbit at your market; fresh or frozen? Jacques has a rabbit recipe and I haven't see it in the local stores, may have to venture into the bigger city markets.


Gretchen's picture

(post #67183, reply #7 of 551)

Have you looked in the freezer section of your supermarket? That is where the more uncommon meat is in our big super here.  I'll bet they would order it for you. It shouldn't be difficult to get in your part of the country.


At our farmers' market there is a booth selling rabbit now.  Just can't do that, although we do occasionally eat it in France.


Gretchen
Gretchen
schnitzel's picture

(post #67183, reply #8 of 551)

Yup, although I haven't checked every market yet. I'll keep looking, but there may not be enough demand around here. I do recall seeing packaged frozen rabbit parts in Bridgeport years ago, I don't go there anymore, if I can help it.


Gretchen's picture

(post #67183, reply #9 of 551)

Well, truth be told, I am A-mazed that it is in our stores!!  Good luck.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Adele's picture

(post #67183, reply #10 of 551)

I found it fresh just once, a couple of grocery stores carry it frozen though.  I asked at one store and they had it by the frozen fish in the big freezer aisle things.  I wish I had a butcher nearby. 

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

schnitzel's picture

(post #67183, reply #12 of 551)

Thanks, that's good to know. I'm sure to find it somewhere.


Wolvie's picture

(post #67183, reply #11 of 551)

do you have a WF nearby? They keep it - usually. Or a Wegman's?


if not, you can always order some from The Duck. :-)


"Progress lies not in enhancing what is, but in advancing toward what will be."


Kahlil Gabran

 

schnitzel's picture

(post #67183, reply #42 of 551)

Geez, I just saw your message (honest!), hate when that happens. No Wegman's in CT. There are two WF stores, Hartford and Greenwich. A bit of a haul, but not too bad, if need be. I'll be going to Wild Oats in Westport to see what they have on my list.


The Duck is an option, they have rabbit, squab, and black truffles. Did you hear my scream when I saw that price??? Eeesh! Guess I can cross truffles off my list.


Wolvie's picture

(post #67183, reply #43 of 551)

you probably heard my scream from DC when I was shopping at Wegman's and saw their price for same - but - at least they were in the store. ;-)


Haven't seen them around here yet.


"Progress lies not in enhancing what is, but in advancing toward what will be."


Kahlil Gabran

 

Fledge's picture

(post #67183, reply #341 of 551)

Fettuccine with Chicken Livers...


I would never have thought of this...sounds yummy.


You don't scare me


I have an African Grey

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

schnitzel's picture

(post #67183, reply #344 of 551)

Yup, I'm just waiting for my tomatoes to ripen.


Marcia's picture

(post #67183, reply #347 of 551)

It would at least be edible if you left out the chicken livers. <G>

schnitzel's picture

(post #67183, reply #13 of 551)

First recipe: Mashed Potatoes
I'm starting out slow, you know, just to balance out the overachievers in the group. (g)

I had promised to make Swedish meatballs on Sunday, so this was also a good time to try Jacques' recipe for mashed potatoes. His favorite are a mix from his Paris restaurant training and home cooking. He says Aunt Aimée's were the best. To the cooking water, she added one clove of garlic for each pound of potatoes, to be mashed with the potatoes after cooking. This lends a faint garlic taste to the dish. I know I've done this before but don't recall where I first heard of it, probably from one of Jacques' earlier cookbooks.


He always makes extra mashed potatoes, so I decided to double the recipe.
Peeled Yukon Gold potatoes cooked in salted water with garlic cloves, drain and press through a ricer; add sweet butter, hot milk, and season with s&p. Nothing too unusual here.

THEN... using a sturdy whisk, whip the potatoes to a smooth, light texture. This is an extra step I hadn't tried, just afraid I'd overwork them into a nasty paste. But these turned out creamy and lovely. 


And I have enough leftover to make another recipe, Pommes Mont d'Or (Golden Hill Potatoes), Gloria's favorite.


To be honest, I still prefer to cook potatoes whole and in their jackets. It keeps them from absorbing too much water and falling apart, and it helps to retain more potato flavor.


soupereasy's picture

(post #67183, reply #14 of 551)

Back in the olden days I was taught to use a whisk, then finish with a wooden spoon. Don't even remember who taught me that.:)

schnitzel's picture

(post #67183, reply #15 of 551)

Interesting. Mom always used a flat masher and then a fork, vigorously, to finish beating it. Jacques also uses more milk for a softer consistency. My usual mashed potatoes are stiffer by comparison. Still good, just different.


Marcia's picture

(post #67183, reply #17 of 551)

From what I've read, the French make mashed potatoes (I doubt they call them that) that are a good deal softer and more liquid than ours. Puree of potatoes, I suppose, but in French.

Gretchen's picture

(post #67183, reply #18 of 551)

And maybe "dauphine".

Gretchen

Gretchen
schnitzel's picture

(post #67183, reply #20 of 551)

I'm making his Gratin Dauphinois recipe for Easter.


Is dauphinois pronounced...doh-feen-wah?  Anyone?


Lee's picture

(post #67183, reply #21 of 551)

Is dauphinois pronounced...doh-feen-wah?


Almost, it's doh fan wah.  :)

schnitzel's picture

(post #67183, reply #22 of 551)

I've been using this site to help me with pronunciations. Listen to how he pronounces dauphine.


deejeh's picture

(post #67183, reply #23 of 551)

I think it's closer to "fin" than "feen".  For instance, the name Celine is pronounced "Suh-lin", not "Suh-leen".


deej

Lee's picture

(post #67183, reply #24 of 551)

LOL -- I mixed up my gra tan with my dau feen  You are correct.  I've been awake since 5 a.m, worrying over everything I need to do before Friday.  No more posting today -- it could be dangerous.

Jean's picture

(post #67183, reply #28 of 551)

Cool.  Thanks!!



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Gretchen's picture

(post #67183, reply #25 of 551)

I believe it would be "fan" as in "dauphin", but "een" when with a vowel following. Now RG can come straighten us ALL out.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Lee's picture

(post #67183, reply #26 of 551)

Yes, that's the way I remember it, but it's been a long time since I studied French.