NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

Rustic European Breads - Alexandra

Alexandra's picture

The rest of the title is - 'from your bread machine', by Linda West Eckhardt and Diana Collingwood Butts.  I've been baking our bread for 10 years and have had this book for almost that long but I usually stick to a few T&T as I tend to throw the bread together before I eat breakfast on Saturday morning.  There are lots of interesting breads in the book and I want to branch out and try some of them.  Also, in the margins are Italian recipes for salads and chicken, etc.  I don't think I'll get bored using this book, or run into things I don't have or don't like to eat.  I mix the dough in my Zor and bake in my oven, that's what they do in the book.  Love this project Biscuit, it's going to be fun.  I'll be walking. *G*, damn that full time job!


                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-


Edited 3/31/2007 11:47 am by Alexandra

                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
wonka's picture

(post #67192, reply #1 of 27)

I like that cookbook. I would mix in the bread machine and then bake in the oven (I like free form bread). Like you I had a few T&Ts that I stuck to. I'm looking forward to your reports on other breads from the book.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #67192, reply #2 of 27)

I am impressed by your choice. I wish I had the guts to do it, but it will be a lot of fun to read your posts

maybe you will inspire me to become a better bread baker.... I just got my round banneton in the mail. Smaller than I thought - but the price was right, so I can adjust the bread to the container instead of the other way around :-)

 


 


"You don't scare me. I've got a Jack Russell and he is the Chief"

Alexandra's picture

(post #67192, reply #4 of 27)

This book also gives you options for size of loaf.  Bread making is more than a mechanical process, weather, water, the baker, all contribute to the outcome.  You need to bake, feel, experiment and learn from it all.  My DH can not follow the same recipe as me and have it come out well.  I've even watched him and don't know what he does differently!  Lots of bigas and sponges used in the recipes.  Today I made the no knead with flax and millet and ww. But tomorrow from the book I've chosen Bruschetta with 2 olive pesto for lunch. 

                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-

                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
Jean's picture

(post #67192, reply #3 of 27)

Oh, goodie, I have that book too. I'll be eager to hear your comments.



Birthdays are good for you. The more you have, the longer you live.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
FitnessNut's picture

(post #67192, reply #5 of 27)

I'm looking forward to hearing your experiences with this one. I remember seeing the book at a store, picking it up and considering buying it, but got distracted by something else. I've never seen it again. I just may have to search it out. ;-)

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell
jojo's picture

(post #67192, reply #6 of 27)

I will be following your post.  I have their other book, Bread in Half the Time, and have baked several things from it and liked it.  This book seems like it will be fun.

nexus's picture

(post #67192, reply #7 of 27)

I have this book and love it. It was a gift from dear friends who caught me reading it every time I was over there on Saturday Pizza nights.


It is available on Amazon by the way.

Alexandra's picture

(post #67192, reply #8 of 27)

April 1, 2007 Sunday


Bruschette with 2 olive pesto and fresh mozzarella pg. 220


The recipe calls for making it in the food processor, but I thought there wasn’t enough bulk for the processor and made it in the blender.  Bad choice, it wouldn’t chop properly.  The olive pesto is quite potent.  I used no knead bread as the base which has good character to stand up to the topping but it was certainly olivey.  I missed having garlic in the tapenade but I was following the recipe.  Maybe as smaller bites rather than a bread spread would have been more to our tastes.  Notes – add garlic, don’t use blender and use in smaller amounts.


 


Pain Ordinaire – Plain French Bread pg 91


Straightforeward easy recipe, but 450F for 30 minutes it too high for my oven.  I baked for 20 min at 450 and the loaves where quite dark.  Learned how to shape bagettes, rolling into rectangles and folding.  Even my slashes didn’t deflate the loaves, they looked beautiful and professional.  A success.


                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
Alexandra's picture

(post #67192, reply #9 of 27)

April 6, 2007 Italian Winter Biga for rolls and wheat bread page 60


I’ve always steered away from starters because they just seemed like a bother to mess with and learn about.  But I plunged ahead and made the biga and left it out on the counter covered with a damp cloth.  The recipe says to cover, but if you cover with plastic wrap how are you going to capture that rogue yeast drifting by?  The next day it had a hard crust on top but after reading further the book says to stir it in and it will rehydrate, which is what I did.  I then used about ½ of it to make Como bread and put the biga in a covered plastic container in the fridge.


 


April 7, 2007, Como Bread pg 122


The biga is only 24 or so hours old when I used it in the 1 ½ lb Como recipe; water, biga, yeast, bread flour, ww bread flour and salt.  Because of the ww flour I added 2 tsp of vital gluten, which is a deviation from the recipe ingredients.  First you have to break up the biga in the water before adding the other ingredients.  I used the baguette shaping I learned earlier and made 2 crusty loaves, in the oven.  The recipe is a bit vague but I think it is baked in the bread machine, which I won’t do, the oven with 5 or 6 ice cubes tossed in to the bottom of the oven gives me wonderful crusty bread.  Baked for 25 minutes at 400.  The bread was heavier than the pain ordinaire and DH could taste the sour quality although he didn’t know I used a starter.  He isn’t very fond of sour breads and the recipe says it won’t taste sour but the biga will contribute to an interesting texture and complex flavour.  I would recommend this recipe to accompany a stew or hearty soup.


 


April 10, 2007


I usually make a sponge for my breads which requires putting about a cup of water, 1/8 tsp yeast and 1 cup bread flour in the machine the night before, running on mix for 2 – 3 minutes and turning the machine off.  Next morning I make the bread with the rest of the flour and water required for the recipe.  So last night I decide to make Challah, pg 136, and it required a sponge to start, calling for ½ the flour, ½ the sugar, ½ the yeast, ½ the water.  Now I didn’t put anywhere near ½ tblsp yeast into a sponge before, nor do I put in any sugar BUT ok, I’m following the recipe.  Put it all in and there isn’t enough liquid to bring the mixture together so I add the other half of the water.  Next morning, puffy sponge and I commence to making the challah.  I get to the braiding part and that brought me up short, it’s been decades since I’ve braided anything but you have to start in the middle and work out to the ends.  After a few false starts I get it braided and set to rise.  Egg wash, black sesame seeds and bake for 40 minutes at 350, no ice cubes for steam.  It was pretty and a little texture but I would prefer brioche to challah.  I don’t think I will make this again.  It wasn’t bad, just not my kind of bread.  I’ve had this book for some time and I chose it to branch out to other recipes in the book but I’m starting to see why I haven’t made these before; they are mostly white breads and I like to get some grains in my diet and only occasionally make white bread.  Tomorrow, ww flax seed no knead!


                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
Alexandra's picture

(post #67192, reply #10 of 27)

April 30/07 Pain aux Noix – Nut Bread pg 130


This recipe has 1 cup of ww flour, chopped hazelnuts and a tiny bit of butter.  I added my usual 1 tblsp of vital gluten to help with the ww flour.  Mixed up the 1 ½ lb. batch, the recipe didn’t call for enough water to bring the dough together so had to add more.  That’s OK, flours vary, as well as climate conditions.  The instructions say to form the dough into 3 equilateral triangles and then put a row of whole hazelnuts down the centre.  But the drawings accompanying the recipe show an oval loaf!  As triangular shaped loaves are hard to cut up for lunches, I opted to make one large oval loaf.  I over heated the oven and put ice cubes in the bottom for steam when the bread went in and immediately reduced the temperature to 375F as per the recipe and baked for 37 minutes.  I thought the bread was pleasantly flavourful with the chopped hazelnuts boosting the regular ww loaf.  DH thought it was average – he LOVES the grainy no knead breads I make every week!  As it only has 1 tblsp of butter and has more flavour than a regular ww, I would make this again.  Probably I will try other nuts too.


                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
Alexandra's picture

(post #67192, reply #11 of 27)

May 2, 2007 No Pain Ordinaire pg 93


This differs from Pain Ordinaire with the addition of some fats in the form of butter and some sugar.  Generally, I hesitate to add sugar to a bread recipe and I find in this book, when it’s in the recipe, it seems like too much.  So I cut back the sugar ever so slightly to 1 tblsp from 1 ½ tblsps.  It still rose up hugely.  I would even cut back to 1 tsp if I made this again.  It has a soft crumb and is quick to throw together when you don’t want to think about what bread to make.  The recipe cooks it in the bread machine, but sorry I just don’t.  Did my usual 10 minutes at 480 F and 20 more minutes at 400 F.


 


May 19, 2007 Brother Juniper’s Santa Rosa Struan pg 112


This recipe has lots of ingredients including cooked rice, oats, polenta, bran, buttermilk.  The recipe states that the cooked rice helps keep the bread moist.  Also has honey and brown sugar, again I think this would be too sweet and cut down the honey from 2 tblsp to 1 heaping tsp and use the ¼ cup brown sugar as called for.  Two tsp salt also seems like too much.  Sorry, just can’t wreck the loaf of bread that will last us through the work week.  I find the amount of liquid called for to be too much as well, and cut back 2 tblsp on that.  This is a wonderful loaf full of good, tasty things but at the same time has a light crumb.  It is excellent for breakfast toast.  Even having cut back on the honey I find it still too sweet for me.  I will make this again but will cut back even more on the sweeteners.  Oh, I mixed all the sugar, salt and honey with the liquid before adding to the bread machine so that the ingredients are thoroughly dissolved before meeting the dry ingredients.


                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
Alexandra's picture

(post #67192, reply #12 of 27)

May 20, 2007 Ciabatta, Slipper Bread, pg. 184


Started a Bigga 2 days ago to incorporate into the Ciabatta. Dough was too stiff so added extra water.  Maybe it’s my flour but I seem to have to add additional liquid to the recipes, by about 1 to 2 tblsps.


The second rise wasn’t very substancial.  Baked at 480F for 10 mins. with ice cubes in the bottom of the oven for steam.  Then turned down to 400F for 15 more minutes.  Very light loaves, I’ve made better ciabatta from other recipes but this one is acceptable.


                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
Alexandra's picture

(post #67192, reply #13 of 27)

June 29, 2007, Raisin Bread, pg. 126

Made a sponge, not as dense as the biga recipe calls for, the night before.  Followed the recipe for the 1 ½ lb loaf.  Was surprised there wasn’t any sugar in the recipe, and also surprised at the amount of salt called for with reduced yeast amount, but followed along.  I hand kneaded in the raisins.  Shaped into one large loaf pan.  Baked at 400 F for about 25 minutes, removed from pan and baked 10 minutes more at 350 F.  This was wonderful bread.  It didn’t need any sugar just a superb loaf.  It is now on my regular baking schedule.
                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
Alexandra's picture

(post #67192, reply #14 of 27)

July 2, 2007, Pain Meteil, page 164.


Very unusual sponge recipe with 1 ¼ tsp yeast!  But I made as dictated and it was very puffy the next morning.  Made the dough but it required more water about 3 tblsp.  The shaped rise of 1 ½ hours really rose up.  Slashed the dough and baked in a dutch oven at 480 F for 25 minutes.  Not outstanding.  I don’t think I would make this again.


                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
Alexandra's picture

(post #67192, reply #15 of 27)

July 7, 2007, Pain de Campagne, French Farm Bread, pg 102.


This recipe has 1 cup of yogurt in it and as I made my own yogurt every week I wanted to try this recipe.  Made the poolish as directed.  The dough recipe calls for 1 tblsp of salt!  I used 1 heaping tsp and it was enough, maybe a typo.  The dough was extremely wet and I had to add 1 more cup of flour than was called for.  Next time I’ll try with ½ the water amount.  It was a moist loaf and quite large, that extra cup of flour added to the size.  I baked in the dutch oven at 480 F for 25 minutes and 10 more out of the dutch oven at 400 F.  I liked this loaf, next time I’ll add some grains and less water and re-evaluate the recipe then.


                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
Alexandra's picture

(post #67192, reply #16 of 27)

July 22, 2007 Georgian Khachapuri, pg 202


This purports to be a Russian bread sold in the streets from pushcarts; considering the milk, butter, eggs, and cheese in this bread I doubt this extremely rich bread was sold to Russians standing in long lines to buy goods.  This bread is a very rich dough rolled out and filled with an egg cheese mixture, then closed up by bringing the edges together over the filling and sealing.  I chose to make 6 individual ‘buns’ in my French Onion Soup bowls, which is an option in the recipe.  As I prepared the filling, I realized that 2 lbs of cheese divided among 6 buns was too much cheese to be eating for one person and it was a lot of volume so I stopped at 1 lb.  Brushed the top and put some black sesame seeds on top and baked as directed. They were very cute looking.  We had them for lunch with a salad and they sure were filling.  DH thought they were very good, me, not so much.  I sure didn’t need a snack that afternoon!  I froze the extra 4, will see how they fare with the freezing and reheating.


                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
Alexandra's picture

(post #67192, reply #17 of 27)

August 4, 2007 Pain de Mie pg 104

I love this bread, I’ve made it before, it’s something like the French version of a sandwich loaf but so much better.  There is no sponge and it has ¾ cup of semolina flour in it.  Also a bit of butter and instant dry milk solids, which makes it a softer loaf.  I make the 1 ½ lb recipe size and bake it in 2 small loaf tins at 380 F for 25 – 30 minutes.  The recipe calls for baking in your machine but I like my oven results better, but if you weren’t home, this is a good option.  I usually find I have to add more water than the recipe calls for, up to ¼ cup more.  It has a lovely cream coloured, fine crumb and its fantastic toasted.  This is definitely a winner and one to make again and again.
                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
Alexandra's picture

(post #67192, reply #18 of 27)

August 18, 2007 Focaccia pg 186


Fococcia is so good right out of the oven but declines from there, which is why I don’t make it very often.  I’ve never had any luck baking any toppings on Focaccia, they always burn; I don’t know how the bakeries accomplish this.  The recipe calls for 2 tsp salt which I think is too much, but following the recipe I put in a scant 2 tsp and as expected found it too salty.  In the oven it humped up like yorkshire pudding.  The sage and rosemary I put on as topping burnt as expected.  All around not much of a success.


 


                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
Jean's picture

(post #67192, reply #19 of 27)

Try the one in NO Need to Knead.



Birthdays are good for you. The more you have, the longer you live.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Sondra's picture

(post #67192, reply #20 of 27)

Peter Reinhart's focaccia is in a Fine Cooking issue 63, I think.  I love the technique (refrigerated overnight), and the advice on toppings is superb.  I have yet to burn any toppings using that recipe.  Some toppings should not be added until the last 15 minutes or so, that might help your problem with burned toppings.

Alexandra's picture

(post #67192, reply #21 of 27)

Thanks I'll check it out and give it another go after I heal from my oral surgery.  Gee, I'm so glad at least one person is reading my bread posts.

                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-

                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
Jean's picture

(post #67192, reply #22 of 27)

You're evidently not paying attention. http://forums.taunton.com/tp-cookstalk/messages?msg=33605.20


Oral surgery is not fun. Get well soon.




Birthdays are good for you. The more you have, the longer you live.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Sondra's picture

(post #67192, reply #23 of 27)

I'm very interested in your bread thread, please keep baking.  After your oral surgery, of course.  Good luck and quick healing to you!!

Alexandra's picture

(post #67192, reply #24 of 27)

September 3, 2007, Raisin Loaf with a Buttermilk Crumb Pg 132, just getting around to posting this now, as we were in France for a month and then work chaos, but I'm back to baking bread from the book.


Have buttermilk on hand that needs to be used up and thought I should probably pick another recipe from the book; opened right to this page and haven’t even seen this recipe in the book before!  The sponge made up fine, didn’t have to tinker with it as I usually find not enough wet ingredient to flour in the recipe.  Used the whole wheat all purpose flour in this recipe – ALL the groceries have stopped carrying whole wheat bread flour, and here I thought everyone was trying to eat healthier and go with more fibre!  Made up the dough as described, but used whey instead of water, as I often do, because I had it drained off my yogurt.  The mixture was like a batter and I had to add about a cup more white bread flour to make a dough.  I looked at the flour/wet ingredient ratio more closely and it is way off.  I’m glad I didn’t make this recipe early in my bread making career because I would have been reluctant to trust any of the recipes in the book.  Kneaded the raisins in by hand and shaped into 2 large loaf pans.  Baked as directed.  I wouldn’t recommend this recipe, the Raisin Bread on page 126 is excellent, don’t waste your time with this one.


Update on the Georgian Khachapuri, pg 202 that I baked on July 22, 2007, I froze the 4 left over buns, remember they were filled with egg and cheese and I wasn’t very enthusiastic about them when I made them but have come to appreciate them.  They look very impressive and have come in handy for quick dinners with a side salad.  Maybe add some cooked ham or sausage to the filling.


 


                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
Alexandra's picture

(post #67192, reply #25 of 27)

November 2007, Mount Olive Rolls, pg 246


These rolls start with a Biga sponge and then have long rising times of 3 – 4 hours for the dough and another 1 ½ hours after shaping.  It’s a simple recipe, you just have to be on hand over most of the day to monitor the rise times.  I had a bit of trouble with incorporating the slippery olives which are kneaded in by hand.  These are very good rolls and I would make them again.


                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
Alexandra's picture

(post #67192, reply #26 of 27)

December 2007, Panettone - Italian Christmas Bread, pg 275


I’ve wanted to try this recipe for some time and now I can put a check mark beside it and can move on.  It is a butter, egg, sugar, bread with raisins, peel, dates, and walnuts incorporated into the dough.  Lacking a Panettone pan or coffee tins to bake it in the traditional domed shape, I used a soufflé dish as someone suggested to me on CT.  Long rise times are indicated in the recipe so it was an all day project.  The dough, in the shaped rise, seemed heavy to me and I baked it as the recipe indicated at 400 F for 10 minutes and then reduce the heat to 375F for an additional 40 – 50 minutes.  It was still batter on the inside and very dark on the outside approaching burnt.  I baked it for another 20 minutes until it reached 190F in the interior and no batter on my instant read thermometer.  The bread, for all its rich ingredients was dry and not very flavourful.  Thumbs down on this one.


                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
Alexandra's picture

(post #67192, reply #27 of 27)

December 2007, Bread Machine Levain and Bread Machine Poolish pgs 56 and 57.


I usually make a sponge the night before I am making a regular crusty loaf of bread, not following any recipe but just throwing some yeast, water and flour into the bread machine to bubble away through the night.  But as I had the holiday week off I decided to look at the recipes for sponges.  I made up the poolish to use right away in the Pain de Campagne (pg 103).  And the Levain to bubble away on the counter for a week before using in a crusty white loaf of no particular recipe.  The pain de Campagne was wonderfully flavourful and as per my note in July when I tried this recipe, I reduced the water from 1 cup to 1/3 cup and it was still too much liquid.  But great bread.  With company coming I decided to use the levain in a basic white loaf and what a disappointment; I was expecting a very flavourful loaf but it was the blandest loaf I have ever made!  I chopped off a chunk of the dough before I shaped it and will see if this sponge will improve or be tossed.  You just never know with bread!


                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-
                 * -:¦:- *
        -:¦:-** -:¦:-**-:¦:-
    -:¦:- ((¨* -:¦:- * ¨)) -:¦:-
        -:¦:- Alexandra-:¦:-