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Mostly Meatless

DeannaS's picture

So, I decided I needed a "project" and since there's occasionally been some interest in what us wacky mostly meatless people eat, and since I'm in a rut with all my go-to recipes, I decided to do a "mostly meatless" project. Basically, that means I'm going to try to do at least 1 new recipe a week, and the majority of them will be vegetarian, though you may occasionally see chicken or turkey crop up. I'm also on the continuing quest to incorporate a wider variety of whole grains into our diet. So, you'll see that theme, too. So, all that being said...first offering coming up.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

Jillsifer's picture

(post #67241, reply #1 of 53)

WAY cool! Can't wait to get some new inspiration on what to feed my meat-resistant son!

 


Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

DeannaS's picture

(post #67241, reply #3 of 53)

Kind of ironic that I started it with one of the chicken ones, eh? Never fear, I have two more truly meatless new to me recipes on tap for this week.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

DeannaS's picture

(post #67241, reply #37 of 53)

So, tonight's venture was a winner with the small fry. It was Heidi Swanson's Big Curry Noodle Pot, with my husband's alterations. Don't ask me why he altered it. I don't know. I guess he didn't want it to be soupy. Anyway, the recipe is here:
http://tinyurl.com/2vegsw

(Saves me the typing.) The alterations - he reduced the coconut milk and the broth by half. We also left off the shallots at the end. And, we threw in some broccoli.

Personally, I like soupy curries as a change of pace, so I would have done the recipe as written, and next time I will. I'll also bump up the amount of curry paste, as it was a little bland for my taste. But, then, we eat a lot of curry, so we're accustomed to it. This is not dissimilar to something we already make with chicken. So, perhaps it was the familiarity of it that got my son to gobble it down. But, he even at the broccoli with only a modicum of encouragement. You know it's a winner when that happens.

I'm wondering if she "blandified" some of her recipes for the book. So far both things we've tried have been good, but not amazing. Of course, we did slight tweaks to both recipes we tried, so it could be all our own dang fault. :) But, it seems like the stuff I've tried from her blog has had a bit more pizazz.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

DeannaS's picture

(post #67241, reply #2 of 53)

Moroccan Chicken on Couscous
Edited to say: This is from The New Glucose Revolution, by Brand-Miller & Wolever

Ingredients:
2 teaspoons ground cumin
2 teaspoons ground coriander
1 teaspoon ground fennel (omitted for cinnamon)
1 x 400g (15oz) can chickpeas, drained and patted dry
2 gloves of garlic, finely chopped
2 red chillies, finely chopped (used 1 serrano)
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 lb chicken breast fillets
½ bunch flat-leafed parsley, roughly chopped (omitted due to shopper error)
1 lemon, rinsed and thinly sliced
½ cup (125ml) dry white wine (used vermouth)
1 cup (200g) couscous
½ cup (90g) raisins
Juice of 1 lemon
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper
1. Combine the cummin, coriander and fennel in a mixing bowl, and toss the chickpeas in the spices.

2. Heat the olive oil in a large work or frying pan. Add the garlic and chillies and cook, stirring for 1 minute.

3. Toss the chickpeas into the pan and cook until the aroma of the spices comes through – approximately 2 minutes. Place chickpeas in ####large bowl and set aside.

4. Add 1 tablespoon olive oil to the pan and cook the chicken fillets for approximately 4 minutes or until just cooked through. Add to the
chickpeas and stir the chopped parsley and lemon slices through.

5. To make a sauce, deglaze the pan with the wine, simmering for 2 minutes.

6. Pour over the chicken mixture and keep warm.

7. Place the couscous in a large mixing bowl and pour 1 cup of boiling water over the top. As the couscous plumps up, gently fork through the
raisins, lemon juice, salt and pepper

----
This was really tasty and easy. The concept will definitely be incorporated into our repertoire of quick dinners. I still prefer the complexity of flavor of a slow-cooked tagine type Moroccan dish. But, for a weeknight meal, this hit the spot.

Next time, we'd add some veggies. We all agreed that zucchini would be excellent in this. I missed the parsley. Alas. By the time we realized that it had been forgotten, it was too late to go get any.


Edited 2/6/2008 3:37 pm by DeannaS

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

whatscooking's picture

(post #67241, reply #5 of 53)

So does this recipe have a low glycemic index then?  It looks really good to me. 

Keep a green tree in your heart and
perhaps a singing bird will come
- Chinese proverb

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

DeannaS's picture

(post #67241, reply #7 of 53)

It's listed as moderate GI.
360 Calories/serving (serves 6)
43g carbs
9 g fat
4 g fiber

(I'm not sure what my tweaking did to it, though.)

Another one on the short list is a barley risotto that IS low GI. I'll post that once we've tried it.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

soupereasy's picture

(post #67241, reply #4 of 53)

Great idea, love those meatless ideas! (Omnivore that I am.)

Gretchen's picture

(post #67241, reply #6 of 53)

Do the ribollita I posted and leave out the sausage.

Gretchen

Gretchen
DeannaS's picture

(post #67241, reply #8 of 53)

Hm... the one I saw had pancetta - is that what you're referring to as sausage, or am I looking at the wrong recipe? Oh wait, I just found another one that you posted that has no sausage, but also nothing in it that I wouldn't eat. Looks like both are variations of Rachel Ray's, yes? I'll add it to the list of things to try.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

Gretchen's picture

(post #67241, reply #9 of 53)

Yes, it was Rachael Ray's ribollita con verdure. I may have just added the sausage myself.

Gretchen

Gretchen
DeannaS's picture

(post #67241, reply #10 of 53)

Well, best laid plans.... Last night I intended to make a squash quinoa thing. But, I cut into the squash and it was mushy. Gross. I had all the ingredients for a barley "risotto" I've been wanting to try, too. But, alas, the barley has to soak overnight.

We were in the middle of a blizzard, so last night we simply doctored a can of black beans and served them with rice and a spinach salad. Nothing exciting, unless people really WANT to hear how we doctor canned beans.

Barley risotto on the menu for tonight, though.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

roz's picture

(post #67241, reply #11 of 53)

I just read a recipe for quinoa risotto at www.lucullian.blogsport.com and it sounded yummy. Quinoa, mushrooms and thyme. Couldn't be simpler. I love Ilva's site, she takes beautiful photos of her surrounding area.

It is www.lucullian.blogspot.com, not ...sport...sorry


Edited 2/7/2008 4:24 pm ET by roz

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
DeannaS's picture

(post #67241, reply #12 of 53)

I'll have to try her method. I don't do mushrooms much, but I'm always up for easy ways to do grains.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

SallyBR1's picture

(post #67241, reply #14 of 53)

I always use quick cooking barley in my "risotto" recipes - I hope this won t get me banned by the barley police, but it is very tasty, and ready in less than 20 minutes

My default dish for meatless meals - eggplant "steaks" or mushroom concoctions - Eggplant parmiggiana is very filling, we normally go meatless when having that for dinner.

Soups in general can be easy too - a mushroom bisque is very filling - Moroccan tomato soup (a la Glenys) is fantastic. Add a grilled cheese sandwich and you are good to go.

Veggiesagna - ricotta, spinach, zucchini, eggplant - another good option for going meatless

 


 


It is not gremolita, it is GREMOLATA!!!!

(October 2007)

DeannaS's picture

(post #67241, reply #15 of 53)

Yah, I thought about trying the quick-cooking barley, too. Aaron might like that better. I'm not sure how much of the "good stuff" is lost in the processing.

Aaron is not at all a picky eater, but the 3 things he definitely doesn't eat? Eggplant, mushrooms, and watermelon. Funny, eh? I know eggplant and mushrooms are both staples for people that are vegetarian, but want some of that meaty texture. I don't like meat texture, so I don't miss them at all.

We eat a lot of soups, a lot of Indian and a lot of Asian. So, you can expect to see some new-to-me versions of all that in the coming weeks.

I don't recall seeing Glenys' Moroccan soup. I'll have to look for that.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

DeannaS's picture

(post #67241, reply #13 of 53)

Barley Risotto
The New Glucose Revolution

Ingredients
2 T. olive oil
1 onion chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1 cup pearled barley (soaked overnight and drained)
1/2 cup white wine (I used vermouth)
zest of 1 lemon
3 cups hot veggie broth
1 "bunch" asparagus (we used broccoli cause asparagus is not in season)
1 "bunch" arugula (we used baby arugula, so just a large handful, chopped)
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/3 cup grated parmesan

Saute the onions in the olive oil until soft. Add garlic and cook until fragrant. Add barely and stir until coated with oil. Add wine and stir until mostly absorbed. Add lemon zest and first ladle of broth. Keep adding broth ala a regular risotto until barley is nearly cooked. Add broccoli when there are 3-4 minutes cooking time left. When all broth has nearly absorbed, remove risotto from heat and add arugula, parm, and lemon juice. Cover and let stand about 5 minutes.

----
We were serving this as a 1-dish meal, so we also threw in a can of "small white beans" right at the end - to up the protein content. Soren got a portion minus the arugula (which he willingly tried, but didn't care for). Sully got a portion minus the cheese.

Aaron and I agreed that the flavors in this were really good. Lemon and parm and argula - what's not to like? Aaron didn't like how much toothiness the barley had. But, he ate 2 servings, so he must have liked it enough, eh? Soren wasn't super excited about it, but he made a valiant effort and then rounded out his meal with an apple. We couldn't quite tell if Sully liked it or not. He'd been sort of off his feed yesterday, in general. So, he ate some of it, but not a lot.

All in all, I doubt we'll make this exactly as is again. We're not really coordinated enough to do things that require an overnight soak. I might try the same basic ingredients with quinoa, which I think will solve Aaron's toothiness issue. Now, I have to figure out what to do with the leftover barley.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

Gretchen's picture

(post #67241, reply #16 of 53)

I haven't ever made the barley risotto, but have seen many recipes--and just looked up a couple of them. They use pearl barley and don't soak overnight--just cook like risotto.  Just a thought.

Gretchen

Gretchen
DeannaS's picture

(post #67241, reply #17 of 53)

I saw that this morning when I was searching to see if anyone else had typed up this recipe before. I'm not really all that familiar with cooking with barley. So, this has been a bit of a learning experience for me. I will say that the barley really swelled after the overnight soaking. And the non-soaked recipes I saw definitely had more broth than this one. I might try it the no-soak way, just to see what happens. I certainly have plenty of leftover barley to use up. :)

I'm wondering if I'd have kept cooking and gone off the recipe if it would have gotten to a more Aaron-pleasing point of done-ness. I kind of liked the texture. Does barley always have a bit of a chew to it, no matter how long you cook it?

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

Gretchen's picture

(post #67241, reply #18 of 53)

I think barley always does have the chewiness--and if you took it further, it might not be "pleasant"--at least to me. Your explanation of the amount of broth for the no-soak makes sense, but the richness of cooking all the way in broth might be better than having the water component. 
And I really wonder if quick barley would even work in a risotto treatment.

Gretchen

Gretchen
DeannaS's picture

(post #67241, reply #19 of 53)

Quick might not work - I'm not sure how quick it is. I would think you'd need at least 15 minutes of cook-time to approximate a risotto type dish. Ah well. I won't try that until I use up the not quick stuff anyway. :)

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

Gretchen's picture

(post #67241, reply #20 of 53)

Make some soup!!


Gretchen
Gretchen
roz's picture

(post #67241, reply #21 of 53)

I certainly have plenty of leftover barley to use up. :)

I have made a spoon bread (cornmeal custard with parm) with wild rice that I got from Food&Wine Mag. You can substitute the barley for the wild rice and I'm sure it will taste just as good. I forget, does your family like eggs, milk, cheese, etc.? Or I remember a Tibetan Barley Bread recipe from The Flavor of Flatbreads. Or a grain salad with roasted winter veggies or fresh veggies. And as Gretchen suggested, there's always soup!

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Adele's picture

(post #67241, reply #22 of 53)

Remember that Spoon Bread from FC many moons ago?  I really liked it.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

DeannaS's picture

(post #67241, reply #23 of 53)

Well, the wee one can't do dairy, but we do occasionally indulge and just feed him something else.

I did a quick search for Tibetan barley bread and it looks like they all use barley flour. Does yours start with whole barley? That sounds very interesting.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

roz's picture

(post #67241, reply #24 of 53)

DeannaS, I don't have access to that cookbook and I can't remember. Maybe somebody out there will have the recipe. I thought it was whole barley, but I could be mistaken.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
CANDILADY's picture

(post #67241, reply #30 of 53)

If you possibly could post the recipe for the spoon bread I would really appreciate it. It sounds soooo good!

Cindy

roz's picture

(post #67241, reply #31 of 53)

Delicious recipe and wish I had thought of it!

http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/wild-rice-spoon-bread

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
CANDILADY's picture

(post #67241, reply #32 of 53)

That recipe sounds so good! I can't wait to make it. Thank you very much for posting the link.

Cindy

Plover's picture

(post #67241, reply #33 of 53)

I never soak barley before cooking it. I would also adjust the cooking method - I would add most or all the liquid at once, cover and simmer. Then, before adding the other things, I would give it a real good stir with a wooden spoon to knock of some of the surface starch to give it that risotto-like texture and feel. Add a little more liquid at this point if it needs it.

You will need a bit more cooking time if you don't pre-soak. I'm like you - not very good with things that require me to do a step in advance.

Edited to say - I just re-read the recipe - I would add the wine and stir as instructed, THEN add all the rest of the liquid.


Edited 2/16/2008 2:38 pm by Plover

DeannaS's picture

(post #67241, reply #25 of 53)

Well, tonight's recipe was not a winner. We made Quinoa with Moroccan Winter Squash from Epicurious:
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/233714

Now, to be fair, partly it was our fault. Aaron did the cooking and I forgot to tell him that some of the reviewers said to cook the carrots longer than the squash. He didn't do that, so the carrots were a bit underdone when the squash was done. I also got a bit of squash that had the stringy part to it, which kicked in my gag reflex. Not pleasant.

Those things aside, I still found it too acidic, and too much repetition in flavors (carrots and onions and tumeric in both parts of the dish). There was no spark. It was a thumbs down from Soren, too. He liked that it had lots of carrots (his hands-down favorite veggie), but he didn't like the quinoa part at all.

Aaron thought this one was a "thumbs sideways," but that's mostly because he didn't expect to like it so was pleasantly surprised that it didn't totally suck. (Of course, he didn't tell me that he didn't expect to like it until after we made it, the dork.)

We'll try quinoa again. I'm still determined to find more whole grains that all of us can agree on. If anyone has a favorite quinoa recipe, I'd love to see it.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow