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Homemade Soba Noodles

Tess's picture

Homemade Soba Noodles (post #67246)

I've been failing at making soba for some time. But I finally made a success of it!! This will not impress a soba master, but it was good! What I learned was that buckwheat is not at all like wheat!! And it is a good idea to let the dough rest. For details, and if you want the recipe I used (with tips) look in on my blog. Failures—cautionary tales—are documented there as well.

Tess's Japanese Kitchen http://1tess.wordpress.com
Marcia's picture

(post #67246, reply #1 of 24)

They're beautiful, Tess. It takes an awful lot to please a master, as I'm sure you know.

I look forward to checking your blog, since I've not visited it lately. It's not from lack of interest, either, but one of those things....

Tess's picture

(post #67246, reply #2 of 24)

Oh, yes, THANKS. There are so very many possible things to cook!

I will never be a noodle master.

But I've been making tsukemono, and there are some recipes that would have lots of appeal. Now I sound like I'm just promoting my blog, but folk on CT look for interesting recipes...

tess

Tess's Japanese Kitchen http://1tess.wordpress.com
Napie's picture

(post #67246, reply #3 of 24)

WOW! Do those look good, I just love soba.


Ann Arbor huh?  I'm a State fan myself....

Tess's picture

(post #67246, reply #4 of 24)

hey Napie!
My dad went to MI State in East Lansing. I remember living in "married student housing" back in the '60s. But I'm in A2 now. My "Wolverine" street sign has been stolen more than once as I'm sure you can relate to!!!
Best regards and enjoy soba a lot,
tess

Tess's Japanese Kitchen http://1tess.wordpress.com
roz's picture

(post #67246, reply #5 of 24)

Your soba look delicious. I have made buckwheat pasta in the past and really enjoy the flavor.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Tess's picture

(post #67246, reply #6 of 24)

Thanks. The recipe made enough for 2 meals (there are only 2 of us), so I let the noodles dry and we ate them last night in miso soup. Very good. I'll post pictures when I have time.

Have you made pizzocheri? It's a lot easier to make than soba because it has eggs in the dough. It's been quite a while since I made it so I don't really remember how it tastes compared to soba. Maybe it's time for me to make some again to see...

Tess's Japanese Kitchen http://1tess.wordpress.com
roz's picture

(post #67246, reply #7 of 24)

Yes, that is what I made...pizzocheri. And made the accompanying potato-savoy cabbage-cheese to go with. It was delicious. So...your soba does not have eggs? You are mighty, as they say here in Ireland!

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Tess's picture

(post #67246, reply #11 of 24)

Ok! You inspired me to do it:
pizzoccheri!
The dough is so much easier to work with—a pleasure to work with. Of course this is not a low calorie dish but it was delicious. My recipe is on the blog.

Tess's Japanese Kitchen http://1tess.wordpress.com
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roz's picture

(post #67246, reply #13 of 24)

Oh, yum! Your pasta looks great and the pancetta with butter and sage, yummier! My 2ft x 2ft sage plant died this winter and I had to plant a new one.

I have raw buckwheat and put it through the grinder. How do you 'toast' buckwheat?

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Tess's picture

(post #67246, reply #14 of 24)

Don't know. The kasha from the store comes "cracked" and is apparently already toasted. Some of the recipes I've used have said to put it into a pan with a little butter or oil, heat it, then add a beaten egg and stir it until it's dry and cooked. Then add water and cook sort of like rice. Or you can do the Jewish recipe with mushrooms and farfalle (sp?) bow-tie pasta.

About the sage, I bought an expensive package at the store and only used a small part of it. Do you think I can freeze it to use another time?

Tess's Japanese Kitchen http://1tess.wordpress.com
Fledge's picture

(post #67246, reply #8 of 24)

Tess everything looks yummy over there.

You don't scare me


I have an African Grey

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

nexus's picture

(post #67246, reply #9 of 24)

That looks so good even I would eat it with relish! I really don't do much pasta since I was married to a man who wanted to be "the cook" and as a result I ate pasta almost every night for five freaking years so if I would eat it happily.... It would be amazing!


Cheryl

Tess's picture

(post #67246, reply #10 of 24)

Well, thanks. I LOVE pasta. Hard to imagine getting tired of it, but every night for 5 years might be too much even for me–did he never really learn to cook? Of course, good company makes any food taste good and vice versa.

Tess's Japanese Kitchen http://1tess.wordpress.com
nexus's picture

(post #67246, reply #12 of 24)

Trust me, you can get pretty sick of oily pasta with too few vegis if you have it long enough. I used to love it too. He's actually not a bad cook but he tends to go through phases of making the same basic thing over and over. My son says he's in a quiche phase now. Not my problem. :).


Cheryl

Tess's picture

(post #67246, reply #15 of 24)

Sorry for your unhappy pasta experience. Now quiche, I would be gone in one second. Never liked that stuff! too eggy.

About what you said: "Not my problem. :)."
I used to get overly emotionally involved in things that went on at work-it was affecting my real life in a bad way. It's a very small non-profit, that is getting less and less profitable. I'd feel that much of what went on was my responsibility so get very upset and emotional about every decision. One of the volunteers said something to me that has become very helpful, "It's not my candy-store!" Sort of a sweeter way of saying the same thing. (bad pun-candy is sweet)
not my problem, not my candy store: very free-ing experience.

Tess's Japanese Kitchen http://1tess.wordpress.com
nexus's picture

(post #67246, reply #16 of 24)

Good one. I tell the guys I work with much the same thing when they get overwrought over work stuff. I look down at my shoulder and gesture brushing stuff off of it. Sometimes I get through, sometimes I don't. Letting it go is good; I love having a job that I can seperate from my real life.


Cheryl

Tess's picture

(post #67246, reply #17 of 24)

I'll have to remember that.
I gave up my position of responsibility due to an injury, and the person who took over did so reluctantly. When I recovered, I found my new position was so enjoyable that she still does the responsible things. Brushing stuff off my shoulder like that would be a nice way to indicate I like my freedom.

Tess's Japanese Kitchen http://1tess.wordpress.com
nexus's picture

(post #67246, reply #18 of 24)

I particularly like to use the gesture to indicate that I harbor no hard feelings for something said. It has multiple good uses and multiple insulting ones...


Cheryl

wonka's picture

(post #67246, reply #19 of 24)

While I was on bedrest during my pregnancy, my husband cooked me pasta and frozen peas every night. I was so glad to go to the hospital where at least I had variety.

nexus's picture

(post #67246, reply #20 of 24)

(Snort), and do you eat these things these days?


He was trying, it sounds like. Are you still married? I'm not, but not because of the food. There werer other, even more compelling reasons.


Cheryl

wonka's picture

(post #67246, reply #21 of 24)

We are still married and we actually like each other. He cooks every saturday (I just don't cook on that day and taking us out was getting expensive so he started cooking on that day). I still frequently get peas and about 1/2 the time I get pasta but I didn't have to cook it so I keep my mouth shut. lol

nexus's picture

(post #67246, reply #24 of 24)

Thats terriffic, and sensible. My aversion is probably more a side effect rather than the source. Thirteen years post divorce we are on our second arbitration this year and last year we were in court twice. None of this is my idea incidently, he's controling and a lawyer and a that's just how he operates. I actually made tortellini once last week which made my son happy.


Cheryl

SallyBR1's picture

(post #67246, reply #22 of 24)

I KNEW it had to be you posting it when I saw the subject!

I am drooling all over it, what an amazing job you did! You know, I've always thought about trying it, but know I never will. TOo much of a wimp

however, pizzocheri seems like a more doable task - I'll give it some serious consideration -

Research is to see what everybody has seen and to think what nobody else has thought.

Albert Szent-Gyorgyi

(through MadMom, March 2008).
Tess's picture

(post #67246, reply #23 of 24)

You are absolutely not a wimp!

Pizzoccheri was definitely easier to make, though. When you do it, add the egg to the flour very slowly, in drops, then process, more drops, process...

I see a little battle going on in the bowl: the buckwheat is really thirsty and quickly hogs up as much liquid as it can, while the flour is slower to absorb it. As they compete, the buckwheat gets fatter and softer, but the flour gets stronger gluten muscles. So you want to add liquid slowly enough to let the flour get its fair share. The eggs provide some enforcement to keep the dough in shape.

Tess's Japanese Kitchen http://1tess.wordpress.com