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Cooking Projects for March

SallyBR1's picture

Two are chosen, I need one more (edited because I just saw the light!)

1. Granola - I never made it, Phil is the granola maker, but hasn t done it in a long time. I want to try a different recipe, not sure which. Suggestions are more than welcome, of course. I want it to be ZE BEST Granola ever...

2. duck. Recipe not chosen yet, but I am leaning towards one of Barbara Tropp's dishes from Modern Art of Chinese Cooking. She has several tasty looking ones. Confit I've made a couple of times already, so that is out. I want it to be a less "classic" dish. No duck a l'orange, no confit.

3. Potato Rosemary Bread from BBA - to finally use it for pizza, something that I've been meaning to do since the great reviews here

It is not gremolita, it is GREMOLATA!!!!

(October 2007)


Edited 3/2/2008 7:54 am by SallyBR1

wisekaren's picture

(post #67242, reply #1 of 23)

We make Jacques Pepin's Duck with Parsnips and Shallots regularly -- do you have the Jacques & Julia cookbook? If not, here's the recipe:
http://verbatim.blogs.com/verbatim/2004/05/duck_duck_parsn.html
(The cookbook photo is MUCH more appetizing than my photo!)
Karen

SallyBR1's picture

(post #67242, reply #2 of 23)

Gosh, it looks great!

now, let me make sure I got this right - you never turn the duck pieces to have the skin up? Or do you turn them after the initial 25 minute browning?

Also, when you buy duck, do you special order it, or get one of those supermarket brands that say "injected with liquid" or "liquid added" - those are the ones I can find easily, and if they work for this recipe, I might go for it

 


 


It is not gremolita, it is GREMOLATA!!!!

(October 2007)

wisekaren's picture

(post #67242, reply #3 of 23)

That is correct -- skin-side-down the whole time.

I buy my duck at Whole Foods, fresh when they have it or frozen otherwise. I've never read the label, but I assume they're not injected with anything. Have you used the liquid-added kind successfully in other recipes?
Karen

SallyBR1's picture

(post #67242, reply #4 of 23)

I've used them before many many years ago - to tell you the truth, I don t remember which recipe I used then, but it did not turn out very good.

However, I've always been a bit insecure about cooking duck, so maybe the problem was me, not the bird - in Paris I made duck a l'orange, but using excellent duck from the butcher near our house. Here, when I made confit, I bought the duck at the Chinese market. Maybe I should bite the bullet and drive to OKC to get the best duck I can possibly find.

 


 


It is not gremolita, it is GREMOLATA!!!!

(October 2007)

whatscooking's picture

(post #67242, reply #5 of 23)

The granolas in FC are pretty good.  My favorite is the crispy pecan.  There's also a really good one on the Cooking Light web site that uses pineapple juice.  However, it is hardly light, especially because I always add extra nuts.  I can send you the link if you are interested.


My cooking project for this month (or more) is to use up pantry goods.  Boxes of arborio rice, couscous, barley, dried beans of every color and size...  My cupboards are overflowing and my freezer is packed solid.  I am only going to buy vegetables and dairy at the market until I can clear up some space.  Things have gotten out of hand once again :)  I need to become a more prudent cook. 


Keep a green tree in your heart and
perhaps a singing bird will come
- Chinese proverb

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

SallyBR1's picture

(post #67242, reply #6 of 23)

I would love to have the link, so I can show Phil and he can pick one recipe for me to make. I don t eat breakfast, maybe will end up having a few tablespoons just to try it, so hubby is the one who will profit from the project... :-)

 


 


It is not gremolita, it is GREMOLATA!!!!

(October 2007)

whatscooking's picture

(post #67242, reply #7 of 23)

Here it is:  Homemade Granola (has the pineapple juice.)  I've also made this Power Granola.  It has a nice mix of healthy things in it but isn't quite as crispy as the Crispy Pecan granola from FC or the Homemade from above.  I only eat granola in small amounts.  My favorite way is spinkled on top of lemon yogurt and blackberries.  Mmmmm.  I can't believe you don't eat breakfast.  How do you manage?  Do you snack before lunchtime?  I would be out of my mind, crazy with hunger.  I have to fast before a 10am physical in the near future and I'm already anxious about it because I know I will be woozy by the time they finally draw my blood. 

Keep a green tree in your heart and
perhaps a singing bird will come
- Chinese proverb

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

SallyBR1's picture

(post #67242, reply #8 of 23)

Thank you so much!

In the morning I have a capuccino very early, and before going to the lab one of those drinkable yogurt, DanActive - I think they have 90 calories

that takes me until lunch time, no need to snack on anything, even if I am going for a run before lunch.

Sometimes I forget to take the DanActive, and I might get a little light headed around noon, but no big deal.

 


 


It is not gremolita, it is GREMOLATA!!!!

(October 2007)

SallyBR1's picture

(post #67242, reply #9 of 23)

First project done.... Granola!

after much debate and reading of recipes, I decided to go with a recipe from Nigella Lawson.

the stuff is awesome. I might even have some in the morning, it is very very tasty. It calls for one quite exotic ingredient: brown rice syrup.

believe it or not, I found it in a natural food store in town. Could hardly believe my eyes when I saw it on the shelf. Now, of course, it would be nice to find other uses for it... although I imagine I'll be making more of this granola, as my beloved former-hippie husband professed it to be "one of the best I ever had"

coming from him, that is a huge endorsement - he is very picky about granola.

I am a little lazy to type all the recipe, but I found a blog with it.

here we go:

(sorry, no pictures, granola is not the most photogenic foodstuff in the universe)

http://orangette.blogspot.com/2008/02/consider-it.html

 


 


It is not gremolita, it is GREMOLATA!!!!

(October 2007)

JillElise's picture

(post #67242, reply #10 of 23)

I love candied ginger in granola.


I also find it's best to toast the grains and add the fruits at the end. I toast the nuts separately.



Edited 3/15/2008 11:55 pm by JillElise

Gretchen's picture

(post #67242, reply #11 of 23)

I do it in steps. First the oatmeal for about a half hour. Then the nuts, seeds, honey, apple juice, etc. get added, mixed and baked until nice and brown and crispy. Then the fruits without any more cooking, of course.


Gretchen
Gretchen
JillElise's picture

(post #67242, reply #12 of 23)

That sounds just right.


Do you use much oil?


Gretchen's picture

(post #67242, reply #23 of 23)

Sorry, just came back to this. My original recipe (from 20+ years ago) did call for a good bit of oil, but then I saw a recommendation for subbing apple juice for the oil, and have done that ever since, using frozen apple juice concentrate. It works very well, and the juice "dries out" with the final baking with the oats and nuts.

Gretchen

Gretchen
ashleyd's picture

(post #67242, reply #22 of 23)

I'm new to this granola business, but after trying several different types in South Africa I decided to give it a go with the FC Honey Almond Granola from a few issues back, which mixes everything but the fruit and then into the oven for around half an hour. I thought it was pretty good, but in the spirit of learning more can I ask what difference it makes toasting the grains and nuts separately? Does it still make clusters?


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #67242, reply #13 of 23)

I decided to make a slight change, due to my love-affair with "The Handmade Loaf"

today I made the rustic potato bread - it is unbelievably good! I am so happy with the results!

It does take a long time, though - about 8 hours from start to finish, but very little hands-on time.

It was a pleasure to work with the dough - you know when you have a bread dough that forms all kinds of bubbles and blisters from the fermentation going on? THis was THE most "bubbly" bread I've made so far.

The raw potato in the dough is supposed to keep the loaf fresh for a longer time - we shall see... :-)

if you want to see the pictures, they are here

http://www2.snapfish.com/thumbnailshare/AlbumID=220092740/a=103329810_103329810/t_=103329810

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(through MadMom, March 2008).
MadMom's picture

(post #67242, reply #14 of 23)

Beautiful!  More info about the pan which mimics the steam oven?



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SallyBR1's picture

(post #67242, reply #15 of 23)

Well, the problem I have with this pan is that I bought it YEARS ago. I saw it on a blog somewhere and the woman was going on and on about how much she loved it

I found it on ebay then - bought it, loved it too. I had forgotten about it, since all the breads in the book call for free baking on a stone. Today I decided to give it a try, and I think it worked quite well

of course, I searched and searched for a link with a picture, cannot find anything. If you do a google, you will see lots of people praising the pan - but at least for me, no luck finding a source to buy it. It's almost like no one is making it anymore

I'll tell you what - next week I'll probably make bread again, I will take a picture of mine. I just don t want to do it now, I put the camera away and feel a little lazy :-)

Research is to see what everybody has seen and to think what nobody else has thought.

Albert Szent-Gyorgyi

(through MadMom, March 2008).
Jean's picture

(post #67242, reply #16 of 23)

So you were the one that stole that from under my nose!


Just kidding. :)  I do remember looking at it though.






Humor is a rubber sword - it allows you to make a point without drawing blood. Mary Hirsch
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
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SallyBR1's picture

(post #67242, reply #17 of 23)

OH, my dear Jean.... I would not in a MILLION years steal anything from under your nose~

This was really long time ago

Research is to see what everybody has seen and to think what nobody else has thought.

Albert Szent-Gyorgyi

(through MadMom, March 2008).
Jean's picture

(post #67242, reply #18 of 23)

LOL  Really long, before I dared to buy on-line.





Humor is a rubber sword - it allows you to make a point without drawing blood. Mary Hirsch
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
knitpik's picture

(post #67242, reply #19 of 23)

Both loaves look very nice but which bread did you prefer? Unless I saw wrong (I've had a long busy day) seems like the loaf baked on the stone had more oven spring, no?

SallyBR1's picture

(post #67242, reply #20 of 23)

A little bit more oven spring - the other loaf had to wait an additional 50 minutes to go into the oven, maybe that also influenced

I "think" I preferred the crunch of the one baked over the stone

we had a friend over the house yesterday and he, his 13 year old son, and PHil went NUTS over the bread - I don t think I ever got as many compliments about a loaf of bread before... :-)

it was a very delicate dough - I made a mess switching it from the floured cloth to the oven. Next time I need to find a better way, maybe get one of those perforated pans that the bread rises AND bakes in?

(credit card starts flexing the muscles....)

Research is to see what everybody has seen and to think what nobody else has thought.

Albert Szent-Gyorgyi

(through MadMom, March 2008).
knitpik's picture

(post #67242, reply #21 of 23)

Congratulations on your baking. You're doing really well.
I don't know how you manage to take pics and make bread at the same time. Oh wait...you work in a lab.

Have you tried using parchment paper? I don't like to move the bread around. If I let it rise on a baking sheet
the whole thing goes in the oven. You can remove the parchment when the bread starts to set.

DH always says "nothing like homemade bread". :)