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CookiMOnster and son -Many Hands Cooking

CookiM0nster's picture

I told Berend about this project and asked him if he'd like to participate, and he was very enthusiastic. He is the cook, and I am his assistant. My role is to read the recipe to him, and help with any steps he's too young to do or uncomfortable with.

In fact he's so enthusiastic he's already started. So far he's made Broonie from Ireland and banana pudding from Barbados. I'll wait to post comments until April 1st.

I chose this book for him because it's a children's cookbook geared to a variety of skill levels. Berend is only 4, after all.

It's a book I cooked from when I was little. It was published by UNICEF in 1974. It's an international cookbook, with one recipe for each of a wide variety of cultures. It only contains 40-odd recipes so finishing it in a year should be easy.

Nightrider's picture

(post #67168, reply #1 of 288)

What a fun idea! 

Marcia's picture

(post #67168, reply #2 of 288)

You're a good mommy, and Berend and Jasper are fortunate to have a mother who encourages them to cook.


I couldn't keep my children out of the kitchen and it really paid off for them.


I look forward to reading about your adventures!

DeannaS's picture

(post #67168, reply #3 of 288)

What a wonderful idea! Soren loves to help in the kitchen, and I told him about the project, too. So, he'll be my trusty helper. But, he hasn't quite mastered enough skills to cook without major assistance.

Is Berend able to do the measuring and such himself already? Soren mostly "dumps" the stuff and stirs and he's learned how to use the electric mixer now. He's great at cracking and separating eggs, too. But, pouring liquid into measuring spoons and figuring out which line to go to on measuring cups and gently scooping flour...not so much.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

MadMom's picture

(post #67168, reply #4 of 288)

I think it's really great for you and Cooki to have your boys help in the kitchen.  Our DGS (eldest) helps measure for cookies, but that's about all.  AntiCook (eldest DD) says she is going to get into the project with her girls, whcih would be great.  We might not only have a great project, but start off a new generation of cooks.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #67168, reply #6 of 288)

This is the first time he's been given the task of measuring everything out himself. To be honest I wasn't really sure if he could do it, but he can. In fact he does it very well. The only thing I have to do for him is pour liquids into measuring spoons - that requires just a little more coordination than he has at the moment. He measures, dumps, stirs, uses the mixer, even scrapes out bowls.

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #67168, reply #7 of 288)

I can just see a book coming out of this project. Hurray for Berend! And next year you're going to have to start another cooking project with Jaspar.

"It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen."
George Orwell, 1984


Edited 3/30/2007 1:01 pm by shywoodlandcreature

DeannaS's picture

(post #67168, reply #8 of 288)

That's great. I was actually thinking after I sent that, that I haven't really given Soren a chance to do it all by himself. I need to set him up with the ingredients in bowls and the measuring stuff on trays or something - so he can be as messy as he needs to be to get the job done. He does all sorts of pouring and such at school. He does the "sweep" with the flour for me. (He loves doing that.) I'd probably still have to help him pick the right measuring cup. But, I bet if I got over my own hangups about flour flying everywhere, he'd probably be able to do it.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #67168, reply #9 of 288)

Yes, it is messier when Berend does it, that's for sure. But he can do it, and I'll bet Soren can too.

The hardest part for me is staying in the background and letting him. It's so easy to step in and start "showing" him.


Edited 3/30/2007 4:18 pm by CookiM0nster

Adele's picture

(post #67168, reply #10 of 288)

Every year I've been home for Christmas, Fiona and I make the chocolate cherry cookies.  First year- she must of been three-  she threw an unshelled egg in the bowl. The past year, I had her find the correct measuring spoons and she ended up doing most of it.  I was really proud of her.  It was really messy though, doesn't quite have the look around/hold the mixer in the bowl coordination yet. 

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

GShock's picture

(post #67168, reply #11 of 288)

>In fact he does it very well. The only thing I have to do for him is pour liquids into measuring spoons - that requires just a little more coordination than he has at the moment. <

May I suggest (I don't remember his age, or know his ability with glass objects) If he is measureing liquid in "measuring spoons" get a glass "jigger"/shotglass with tsp and tbsp markings. Or maybe a one cup handle free measuring glass.

Then, take a small thin rubberband, and *you put it on the jigger or glass cup JUST above if not right at the height of the measure (ex: just above the 2 tsp mark, or just above the 1/2 cup mark.

He may be able to pour using a smaller container, to the correct measuring mark.

gbs

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #67168, reply #12 of 288)

What a brilliant idea, thanks!
He's only four, so the problem for him is being able to hold both the spoon and the container he is pouring from steady at the same time.

TracyK's picture

(post #67168, reply #13 of 288)

Another workaround would be for you to pour the liquid into a small bowl, and Berend could scoop it with the spoon. :-)

CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

madnoodle's picture

(post #67168, reply #14 of 288)

OXO makes a tiny little 4T measuring "cup". It's marked in Tbsp, I believe, and is great for kids (and me too).   And, psst, I don't bother measuring 1/2 tsp or even 1 tsp. of liquid--I just eyeball it using the lid from the container--I figure the lid from the vanilla bottle, for instance, holds about a teaspoon.

Saskatchewan:  our mountain-removal project is nearly complete.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Nightrider's picture

(post #67168, reply #15 of 288)

I do the same thing!  I don't think I've ever actually measured vanilla...the lid just makes such a handy receptacle.

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #67168, reply #16 of 288)

I don't even use the lid anymore, I jut pour what looks like a good amount. However it would be a bit dangerous to let Berend do that I think!

By the way, he selected his next dish tonight - baked prawns from Camaroon

Nightrider's picture

(post #67168, reply #17 of 288)

Wow...such sophisticated tastes!  You're teaching him well :)

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #67168, reply #18 of 288)

I'd like to take credit, but alas I think it's more just his personality. He's a great eater, but his brother barely eats anything, and it's not for lack of trying it. He tastes most things, just doesn't like them.

madnoodle's picture

(post #67168, reply #19 of 288)

However it would be a bit dangerous to let Berend do that I think!


Not to mention expensive . . .


Saskatchewan:  our mountain-removal project is nearly complete.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

FitnessNut's picture

(post #67168, reply #5 of 288)

What a great idea! I'm looking forward to reading all about your shared adventures in the kitchen.

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell
CookiM0nster's picture

(post #67168, reply #20 of 288)

As I mentioned earlier, Berend had already made two recipes before the official start date. More about those later.

Today we woke up to a surprise snowfall, and he serendipitously had a chance to make the recipe he's been waiting to try since I first showed him the book: Maple snow, representing Canada.

It's a very simple recipe: scoop some snow into a cup and pour warmed maple syrup over it. Even though the recipe was not authentic (according to the friends with whom he shared it), it was still delicious - like maple snow cones. In the authentic version, apparently, the syrup is boiled down enough and the snow cold enough that it makes maple candy when you pour it on top. Berend didn't care, and nobody else did either. Jasper wanted seconds.

I scooped the snow for Berend, out of a desire to make sure it was clean, but he measured the syrup and heated it in the microwave all by himself, and portioned out the snow and poured the syrup on top with a bit of guidance as to how much to use. He did all this with great pride as his friends looked on.

Jean's picture

(post #67168, reply #21 of 288)

How precious. You are such a good Mom! :)



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drussell's picture

(post #67168, reply #22 of 288)

Wow, this brings back memories. My dad and I used to do this after a snowfall when I was a kid if we had maple syrup on hand. My dad was Canadian, from PQ.


It's neat that maple snow ended up in a cookbook for kids!

MadMom's picture

(post #67168, reply #23 of 288)

Never eat yellow snow.


Sorry about that...I just remember that warning.  Seriously, sounds like such a fun dish for him to make, and glad everyone enjoyed it.  Now, do tell us about the other ones he made.




Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!
DeannaS's picture

(post #67168, reply #26 of 288)

That could be a recipe to represent Northern Wisconsin, too. My mom has told me stories of that being one of her favorite treats - second only to johnnycake and maple syrup. My great uncle worked at a maple-sugaring shack, and they would do it with the sap that was being boiled there, apparently. So, it was definitely of the "very hot syrup & cold snow" variety. We tried it once as kids, but didn't have the syrup hot enough to get the full effect. But, whose going to complain about a maple snow cone, really?

What a fun thing for Berend to do! And, even better that his friends could take part.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #67168, reply #61 of 288)

Berend made cornbread (representing Paraguay) tonight to go with supper. There was an option to make sopa Paraguaya, with onions and cheese added, but he decided to stick with plain old cornbread.

I'm certain there is a type-o in the recipe, but we made it as written anyway. It calls for 1 1/4 cups of butter for a 8-inch square pan of cornbread. (I assume that it was supposed to read 1/4 cup butter.)

This was an easy and fun recipe for Berend. He's becoming an expert at measuring dry and wet ingredients. He even let his brother help stir, and supervised him to make sure he did it carefully enough.

As I mentioned there was a whole lot of butter in the recipe, but the cornbread still baked OK, even if it did look a bit oily, and it tastes very good. It is extremely rich, though, and we all got up from supper feeling very full.

DH's first comment upon tasting it was that it was very sweet, and it was. This recipe has 1/4 cup of sugar in it whereas I usually make my cornbread without any.

Berend had three pieces with his supper and we cut him off for fear he'd get a stomach ache or he would have had a fourth.

Next up: Jasper's going to get a turn, arranging slices of ham and cheese on a platter for a Dutch breakfast. Berend decided that one was too easy for him so he'd pass it on to his brother. Still, he's a little skeptical Jasper will pull it off. He thinks he'll just eat it all himself. He may be right. We'll see.

knitpik's picture

(post #67168, reply #62 of 288)

Aww. That is just too cute. You'll have to take a pic of Berend teaching Jasper.

Jean's picture

(post #67168, reply #63 of 288)

Yes! More pictures.



Birthdays are good for you. The more you have, the longer you live.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
MadMom's picture

(post #67168, reply #64 of 288)

I love it!  Tell Berend it still counts, even if Jasper eats it all by himself, LOL.  Just be sure to take a picture for us.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Aberwacky's picture

(post #67168, reply #66 of 288)

I'm finding this thread to be quite inspiring. 


Remind me again how old Berend is?  I know Jasper's about 2 months older than Grant, I think, but I've lost track of Berend's age!


Leigh


Cooking is messy.  Deal with it or stay out of the kitchen.

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
CookiM0nster's picture

(post #67168, reply #67 of 288)

He turned 4 last January.

I'm sure Grant could handle the Dutch breakfast too. You arrange sliced meats and cheese on a platter and set it on the table with bread, butter, and jam.