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What's In Your Wine

roz's picture

The following article is over one year old, so don't know if it is still pertinent. The BBC is doing a TV show on this subject tonight.

Should we be worried? Are these additives only in cheaper wines? Perhaps gmunger will have something interesting to say on this topic. Thanks.

http://tinyurl.com/5emues

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
wop's picture

(post #36407, reply #1 of 5)

Easy... buy Italian wines additives are not allowed by law here.
Philip

ashleyd's picture

(post #36407, reply #2 of 5)

What's allowed by law and what actually gets into your wine are two entirely different things. Not that I am saying Italian wine does have these things, but the law cannot act on what it does not see. But buy Italian wines is good advice anyway.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

wop's picture

(post #36407, reply #5 of 5)

Yeah, you are right about that. but I will also add that since the 1985 methanol scandal the controls on wine production are much more strict, so at least it's a pretty good probability that the wine is good.
Now if you want to get into the discussion about sulfites that is a whole different matter. I asked the guy who makes the wine we bottle and got a one hour lecture on sulfites . I now know more than I ever wanted to know about them.
Philip

BonnieinHolland's picture

(post #36407, reply #3 of 5)

roz, the article lists a whole lot of substances and processes so it's hard to talk in general.  Some are used for more expensive wine as well as for cheaper wine.  Some are used in Europe (even in Italy) as well as in America.  But there's nothing to be afraid of with, for example, oak chips.  Nor from the use of tartaric acid, for example.  Nor from micro-oxygenation.  If it's health you're worried about.  But these processes do impact the eventual flavor and quality of the wine.  The better producers attempt to keep their wine-making as natural and simple as possible.  cheers, Bonnie

gmunger's picture

(post #36407, reply #4 of 5)

Perhaps gmunger will have something interesting to say on this topic.


More likely something stupid...


Seriously, don't stop drinking wine. It's all safe, mostly.


As for the article, it covers a lot of complex territory, rather quickly. But I'm glad you posted it, as it has caused me to investigate some of this stuff more thoroughly. Hopefully I can issue a more detailed, perhaps intelligent response in the next day or so.


 


We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.