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What's on the menu for Easter?

Debby's picture

The 'menfolk' have determined that a large bone-in smoked ham shall be the main event for Easter dinner.  Now to come up with the sides (asparagus will have to be on the menu--it's one of my favorites.) and of course dessert...


What's everyone else doing?


Debby

Wolvie's picture

(post #29084, reply #1 of 84)

a weekend affair here. Duck breast and lamb are definitely on the menu. Haven't decided how yet. Or sides. I'll have that down later this week.

"So beautifully arranged on the plate - you know someone's fingers have been all over it."
Julia Child

 

Debby's picture

(post #29084, reply #9 of 84)

Duck breast and lamb sound great!--There are times I wish my 'men' weren't so tied to tradition.  lol.  Ah well, it has been some time since I did up a ham, and come to think of it, I did manage to break away from the turkey at Christmas...


Debby

Madeleine's picture

(post #29084, reply #23 of 84)

"and a small basket for everyone containing egg-shaped sugar cookies with each guest's name in sugared icing and a few candies and other little stuff (but no jelly beans)"


Love this idea!  Since one of my guests is bringing a cheescake for dessert and that lets me off the dessert hook, I was thinking about making some sugar cookies.  I will try to get to the "Christmas Tree Shop" and get some inexpensive baskets to put them in.


I saw an asparagus gruyere tart in a free issue I received last year of Martha's (shh again!) little cooking magazine (forgot what it's called).  Has anyone ever made something like that?  Do you serve it warm or cold?  Recipe didn't say.  It looked tasty and I was thinking of putting it on my Easter menu.  I, too, will be making a ham.  Deviled eggs for starter...know some of you are fans, others not...but we love them here.  Spinach salad with either apples or pears and a honey dressing. Potatoes...type TBA at a later date.  Probably some carrots.  Asparagus in some form if not the tart.  Not sure what else.


Just curious...how many people do most of you have for the holiday dinner?


Madeleine
Madeleine
Cissy's picture

(post #29084, reply #53 of 84)

I did manage to break away from the turkey at Christmas...


So did I last year.  DH was crestfallen, but the only fresh (as in never frozen, not injected with vile things and without one of those pop-up thingies) one left in the supermarket was a 30 pounder.  It would not have fit into my roasting pan.  Fortunately, there was a 14-rib crown roast of pork and that was fantastic.  As a result, I think we may have a new tradition for Christmas.

Jean's picture

(post #29084, reply #2 of 84)

Back by popular demand -- a falling apart tender Picnic (ham) boiled not baked, asparagus with cheese sauce, mashed potatoes maybe twice baked, for starters, I'll need one more Non-green veggie, maybe carrots, corn for the kids, a saucy side, apple? home made dinner rolls, hmmm what for dessert? cherry pie? Phil's pie looked good.

When everything is coming your way, you're in the wrong lane.
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A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
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help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Wolvie's picture

(post #29084, reply #3 of 84)

roasted carrots with cumin and coriander are fab, Jean. Just a thought.

"So beautifully arranged on the plate - you know someone's fingers have been all over it."
Julia Child

 

Debby's picture

(post #29084, reply #11 of 84)

I've never boiled a ham before!  How does that work?--Do you glaze it and put it into the oven at the end or...?  I've soaked a ham, but never boiled one.


I'll do a corn pudding, potato gratin, sweet potato biscuits and/or chiqui's parkerhouse rolls, asparagus (not sure whether to incorporate it into the salad starter or have it as a side--I did like chiqui's idea of roasting it with red pepper strips.)and...another side of some sort...


Must look for my chutney recipe to serve with the ham--one of Glenys's I think.  Then there's dessert...I have a recipe somewhere for individual shells made with coconut and filled with lemon curd...


Debby


p.s.  Yes, Phil's apple pie did look great, but I don't think I can wait til next weekend to try it!  Have already pulled some pie pastry out of the freezer!  I'll just swap the walnuts with pecans!

Slip's picture

(post #29084, reply #14 of 84)

Wow, you're going to make my pie, that's exciting.  I fully endorse the substitution of pecans for walnuts, any time.  Good luck and good eatin'

PEK

"meaner than Mean Chef!"

Debby's picture

(post #29084, reply #62 of 84)

The family loves your apple pie--thanks so much for the great recipe!!  It's a definite "keeper"! :)


Debby

Slip's picture

(post #29084, reply #64 of 84)

Glad that the pie was OK.  "Who doesn't like a pony?" (pardon my Seinfeld).  This weekend I'm on a new mission, "gateau chocolat de Paques (Easter)."  If I'm going to cook, I'm going to enjoy the hell out of it.

PEK

"meaner than Mean Chef!"

SallyBR's picture

(post #29084, reply #65 of 84)

Well, I am glad hubby's plans to make a chocolate cake were not affected like MY leg of lamb...


Believe it or not, there are NO legs of lamb left in this town! I can hardly believe it, nowhere, nowhere....


Very disappointing..... I guess I'll have to switch to plan B: baked ham


(le sigh)


 

 

CTI's picture

(post #29084, reply #69 of 84)

Sally, all your sides will still work if that's any consolation. Consider adding a chunk of ham and some drippings to some collards for flavor or pick up a smoked ham hock for it. The boys might be surprised they like it.


If your meal is tomorrow you can still call the nearby stores and see if a reserved lamb was never claimed. You might luck out. I hate when my planned main dish or special side ingredient isn't available.


If you go with ham be sure to have a couple of mustards and some horseradish, and sour cream or creme fraiche or drained yogurt as a mixer.

Debby's picture

(post #29084, reply #67 of 84)

"gateau chocolat de Paques (Easter)."  If I'm going to cook, I'm going to enjoy the hell out of it.


That's great!  Go for it! :)  Happy Easter everyone!


Debby

Jean's picture

(post #29084, reply #16 of 84)

This is a cured front shoulder. Tougher than the ham. You boil it about 20 -25 minutes per pound and it comes out pull apart tender, DH prefers it to sliced which he accuses of being rubbery.

When everything is coming your way, you're in the wrong lane.
www.thebreastcancersite.com



 

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
chiquiNO's picture

(post #29084, reply #17 of 84)

R-e-s-e-r-v-a-t-i-o-n-s!!!!!!!!!!  My children and grandchildren will be going with their father to the Florida coast for the long weekend...that leaves me home alone with Princess....she works til about three so we'll go out to dinner around 6...let someone wait on us for a change.  She's been working 12-hour days at a new restaurant and I've been pretty busy at the cooking school.

Chiqui from way down yonder in New Orleans

 

shoechick's picture

(post #29084, reply #19 of 84)

We going to a barbeque!  Very weird, but I'm game.

Born Free....Now I'm Expensive

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

Geoffchef's picture

(post #29084, reply #18 of 84)

Had ham once at a wedding that was cooked in 7-UP. It was fabulous, but I have no idea how you do it. :)

Twenty four hours in a day, twenty four beers in a case. Coincidence? I think not! Steven Wright

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

Debby's picture

(post #29084, reply #24 of 84)

I've heard of coca cola for ham; think it was poured over a crust of brown sugar and spices...or some such thing!  :)


Debby

bjnjii's picture

(post #29084, reply #32 of 84)

Hi Debby Jane, Ham baked with Coca-Cola is a tradition at my home.  In addition to the Coke, I save the juice/brine from jars of dill pickles and use that as well.  I generally do not put the brown sugar and mustard over the ham...save that method for special occasions.   Basting frequently with the coke allows it to make a "glaze."  Here is what I do and it makes a wonderful, moist ham. 


Preheat oven to 325 deg F.  Place ham (butt or shank) in a roasting pan.  Using a basting tube, generously apply dill pickle juice/brine to the ham.  Put in oven and bake 30 minutes.  Now begin basting with Coca-Cola every 15-20 minutes until done (I bake mine 25 minutes per pound, uncovered), occasionally baste with more dill pickle juice.  Allow to cool 20 minutes before slicing.   Wonderful flavor and moist.


Second Method:  Remove skin from ham (butt or shank), leaving some of the fat.  Score fat.  Mix equal parts yellow mustard and brown sugar and cover ham.  You may put pineapple slices over top of ham using toothpicks to secure...Maraschino cherries can be placed in center of pineapple slices.  Bake 30 minutes.  Now begin basting with Coca-Cola.  Wonderful !!


Third Method:  A friend from Louisiana taught me to boil a picnic ham this way....boil until meat starts to fall off bone.  Remove meat and put on baking sheet and bake about 30 minutes - to dry meat and release oil; however, I find it is better to remove the ham just before it falls off the bone and either put a mustard/brown sugar plaster on it and bake at 325 deg, approx 40-45 minutes, or simply bake it as is about 35 minutes to release oil...broth from boiling ham is then used for soup, etc.  (Note:  A tablespoon or two of pickling spice can be added to water if you are not going to use broth for other purposes.)...Very Good !!


 


 


 

RheaS's picture

(post #29084, reply #33 of 84)

I'm going, as usual, to a semi-potluck where two of us plan a menu and cook enough for up to 20 or so guests, but some guests usually bring something. A friend has already indicated that she will be cooking a ham. I think I will roast a duck and maybe a chicken for those who don't eat duck or ham. The sides under consideration are roasted baby potatos, maple-glazed carrots, green beans and asparagus. Dessert will most likely be a cake. I'm really enjoying the recipes in The Whimsical Bakehouse (thanks again Ruth Wells). The colourful cakes are scary, but the cakes themselves, fillings and frostings have all been very good.

RuthWells's picture

(post #29084, reply #34 of 84)

<smooch> Rhea!


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

Debby's picture

(post #29084, reply #37 of 84)

Wow!  Thanks so much for all the info--can see I'll have to do some experimenting.  Am wondering tho--doesn't all that coke burn onto the pan?  Do you line your pan with foil; place the ham on a rack and add fluid of some sort to the pan below?


Debby

bjnjii's picture

(post #29084, reply #45 of 84)

When I use pickle juice/brine and coke, I do not line the pan and it does not burn badly as I baste often enough to keep the bottom moist.  Additionally, with this combination of pickle juice, coke and grease baked from the ham on the bottom of the pan, I like to tilt the pan and suction it with the baster and re-apply to the ham occasionally.  Play with it.  You can't ruin this.


In method No 2, the brown sugar/mustard does create a problem, so line the pan if you wish or put it on a rack.  I prefer a rack over foil.  (Don't know if you have ever heard of this but a lady once told me when you have a pan with something baked on that will make it nearly impossible to clean, spray heavily with WD-40 and leave overnight in a heavy-duty bag tied off and the next day cleaning will be easy.  I did this once and found that I still had to soak it in hot water a few minutes, but it did clean easily.


Method No. 3 is not difficult to clean if you bake it w/o the brown sugar/mustard glaze - otherwise, use foil, or a rack if it has not cooked to where it falls off the bone.


Enjoy!  bj


 

Debby's picture

(post #29084, reply #51 of 84)

Appreciate all your suggestions bj!!  Thanks again!


Debby

bjnjii's picture

(post #29084, reply #55 of 84)

Welcome

bjnjii's picture

(post #29084, reply #56 of 84)

I have narrowed my menu down, but need a few suggestions from some of you great cooks:


Pork Loin Roast w/Cranberry Glaze


Baked Turkey Breast


Roasted Asparagus


Mashed Potatoes: 


About 7 medium boiling potatoes
1/4 pound (1 stick) butter
1 cup whipping/heavy cream
1/4 cup of shredded cheddar cheese
1 Tbl freeze-dried chopped chives
1/4 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp parsley flakes
Milk


Stuffed Celery Sticks: 1 cup grated Cheddar cheese, 4 grated boiled eggs, 1/4 cup minced onions, 1 tbs ea minced celery & red bell pepper, 1/2 cup mayonnaise, Dash red pepper sauce, Salt and cracked black pepper to taste...


Dessert to be decided:


I would like to make a carrot dish and wonder if some of you would share a really great carrot recipe; also, what other green veggie side would you prepare?

CTI's picture

(post #29084, reply #58 of 84)

Yum on everything! Do consider using fresh parsley - I would use at least 1 teaspoon per potato, probably more as I love parsley. What about brussel sprouts or green beans, or a couple of green salads or coleslaw, or mustard or collard greens? Have you thought of subbing blue cheese for the cheddar in the celery sticks so as not to duplicate the cheddar in the potatoes?


A few ways I like carrots are parboiled and marinated overnight or longer in vinegar with onions and cilantro; roasted in oil with salt and pepper - maybe some cumin; sauteed in butter with some smoky paprika; shredded raw and mixed with lemon juice and real mayo, stuffed green olives and cucumbers - omit the olives and add raisins to make it sweet.  

bjnjii's picture

(post #29084, reply #60 of 84)

Thanks to you good cooks, I will now only use Italian parsley...this I "will" add to the potatoes and thanks for the suggestion.  Also, I saw the cheese being duplicated but would not have thought of the blue cheese and thanks, will make that change in the celery sticks as we love blue cheese.


WOW!! Debby, you two have given such great recipes for the carrots -- it's a toss up.  Thanks for those recipes.


I have collards in my freezer from my husband's winter garden...will have those and maybe green beans.


I know my menu may sound a bit much, but I like extras and 'special' dishes on these occasions. 


I take my car to a SIL's POB to be serviced and when I go in after a holiday the staff comment on our meal and jokingly ask to be invited the next time.


I have a feeling you cooks improve my reputation.


 


 

CTI's picture

(post #29084, reply #61 of 84)

"my menu may sound a bit much, but I like extras and 'special' dishes on these occasions"


I'm with you bj, and I get a kick out of making one veggie two or three ways, which you could easily do with the carrots. Debby's recipe would really please the sweet tooths in your gathering. I forgot to mention that I sometimes serve a bowl of brown sugar or a honey dispenser to augment carrots cooked only in butter. For the sour fans they love the green olives in the raw carrots but I sometimes also serve them on the side for low-salt people.


Although I didn't express Italian rather than curly parsley, I think the flat leafed variety is more attractive and potent flavored. I use both, just never dried. The curly is supposedly a good breath freshener - it's always cheaper than the Italian and it keeps well as a traveling snack item.


BTW, Stilton or Gorgonzola also goes well with celery or you can add some sour cream or drained yogurt to cream up the blue cheese if it's too crumbly.

bjnjii's picture

(post #29084, reply #63 of 84)

I've made a note of all that, CTI, and thanks for all your help.