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what was your best dish?

MarineEngineer's picture

I finally persuaded my sister that the green beans deserved more than a can of cream of mushroom soup. This was the result:

green beans, with carrot and red bell pepper, tossed with garlic, olive oil and kosher salt, roasted until almost tender but still crisp, then served with a squeeze of lemon. The kids couldn't get enough. My sister thought they weren't cooked enough. Kids won.

how 'bout you??

Jonathan

kathymcmo's picture

(post #36742, reply #1 of 77)

This butternut squash gratin I made from FC was a big hit.


http://www.taunton.com/finecooking/recipes/butternut-squash-apple-leek-potato-gratin-cheddar-crust.aspx


Happy Thanksgiving, your beans look great.

whatscooking's picture

(post #36742, reply #2 of 77)

That gratin looks great.  I love all those flavors together. Did you have get a huge squash to get 12 oz of squash "neck part only?"

The world is divided into two kinds of people: 
those who wake up thinking about what they're going to eat
for supper, and those who don't.


Lynne Rossetto Kasper and Sally Swift
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
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kathymcmo's picture

(post #36742, reply #4 of 77)

The one I used wasn't that big but it was all neck. ONe I got at the farmers market. I pretty much used the whole thing. Don't have a scale (although I am thinking I really should get one!).


I'm definitely making that recipe again, even my nephew who isn't big on vegetables loved it.

RuthWells's picture

(post #36742, reply #14 of 77)

I adore that gratin. Yum.

Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw


www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com


http://walk.pkdcure.org/goto/ruthwfischer

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

Glenys's picture

(post #36742, reply #3 of 77)

I'd just love to grab you for some knife handling techniques. They don't appear cooked, but then that begs the question, do you know aboutn the blanching/shocking technique?

MarineEngineer's picture

(post #36742, reply #6 of 77)

I'd say the beans were semi-cooked, about halfway between raw and soft. Everyone but my sister seemed to like them that way. Seemed light, compared to all the heavy dishes drenched in gravy ... mmmm ... gravy.

Jean's picture

(post #36742, reply #7 of 77)

Speaking of beans-- I had fresh green beans on my grocery list and DH came home with  these....in a microwaveable bag. Of course I didn't do that! But I must say they were the most expensive green beans we've ever eaten!


Can you imagine??!!





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Marcia's picture

(post #36742, reply #10 of 77)

DH buys the Sunday newspapers at a supermarket, and often picks up several other items we may need. Lately he's been coming home with vegetables in packs like yours, but they always seem to be half price and sometimes 75% off. He'd better not buy them at full price!!!

MadMom's picture

(post #36742, reply #11 of 77)

Not really my best dish (that would have to be G-Ma's carrots, as usual) but it was nice to have DD and DSIL do all the dishes after Thanksgiving.  They always insist on doing the dishes when they eat with us, and it is so great to just get up from a meal, particularly a big one like that, and relax!  DD even divided up the leftovers and they took some home; that was a really big help!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Gretchen's picture

(post #36742, reply #12 of 77)

We had 14 for the dinner--our usual best friends from down the street, their adult daughters (both of whom baby sat our kids) and their children and one SO. Then DS had asked last week if he could invite two high school friends, both of whom are recently divorced and away from their children--both guys are great friends and additionally had  lost both or one of their parents in the past year!! One of them was our next door neighbor for 30 years--grew up with our kids.  And DDIL had never met them but had heard ALL the stories!! So it was really a great reunion/gathering.


I didn't know I could get 14 at the table but did it--13 had been the limit before!!


By the time I sent food home with DS and one of the fellows, I had practically NO leftovers--always a good thing after T'giving. I think dealing with leftovers is my least favorite task.  We have enough turkey for a meal, and I'm getting ready to make stock.


Gretchen
Gretchen
MadMom's picture

(post #36742, reply #13 of 77)

Ahhh, different strokes.  To me, the best part of Thanksgiving is the leftovers.  I love putting cold dressing, mashed potatoes, turkey, gravy, and carrots on a plate and nuking it.  A simple meal which requires no cooking on the stove at all!  After several days of cooking, that is refreshing.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

roz's picture

(post #36742, reply #15 of 77)

ITA about leftovers! After the workout this a.m., we invited our workout partners for coffee and apple tart! Then we had the butternut and cauliflower soup. Tonight it is the stuffing, gravy, turkey zapped! Heaven!

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Gretchen's picture

(post #36742, reply #21 of 77)

OH, I love eating it. I just hate to have so much that my downstairs and upstairs fridge if full of dribs and drabs for days!!


DS's cholesterol is up so he couldn't take any gravy!! Quarts to deal with. I think it is down the drain.  We can't eat it either.


Gretchen

 

We did have an outstanding wine or two. Went shopping with dD and she picked a Pine Ridge chenin blanc/viognier blend. It was lucious. It also turns out that right here in Charlotte we have a wine distributor she likens to K. Lynch in Berkeley--his name is Eric Solomon. So if you find some of his wines, she recommends them highly.


Edited 11/28/2008 11:10 am ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
TracyK's picture

(post #36742, reply #23 of 77)

You know you can freeze gravy. :-)


"The world expects us to elect pompous yahoos and instead we have us a 47-year-old prince from the prairie who cheerfully ran the race, and when his opponents threw sand at him, he just smiled back. He'll be the first president in history to look really good making a jump shot. He loves his classy wife and adorable daughters."                          -- Garrison Keilor

Gretchen's picture

(post #36742, reply #27 of 77)

Yup, but it is still the danger factor!!  I/we might eat it. DD is coming home in two weeks and I might just have to save her some.


I just stripped the carcass and have a big plate of nice turkey. Found the nubbins of the stuffing and pleasured myself with stuffing, gravy, stewed apples, and a dab of cranberry sauce.


Carcass is bubbling.


I do think that my gravy is extra good because of the stuffing that gets pushed out into the drippings I use.  I know if flavors the stock I make.


 


Gretchen
Gretchen
Marcia's picture

(post #36742, reply #26 of 77)

OMG, if I disposed of gravy, I'd be drawn and quartered. Of course, I do understand about your DH's health, which makes all the difference.

soupereasy's picture

(post #36742, reply #38 of 77)

The "viognier" is new to me, but I love the taste! Seems really clean and crisp. Is it always a blend? I have tried several and, truth be told, don't remember.

Gretchen's picture

(post #36742, reply #41 of 77)

To my knowledge, it isn't always a blend. I have bought some that were listed as just that. This was SO fresh and crisp.

Gretchen

Gretchen
soupereasy's picture

(post #36742, reply #42 of 77)

Thumbs up on that!:)

thecooktoo's picture

(post #36742, reply #45 of 77)

Viognier is a wonderful, floral and as you have already found out, lovely crisp wine.  It used to be grown almost exclusively in the Rhone Valley of France.  And it was almost never grown anyplace else.  Somebody finally figured out that instead of just using it to make a French blend that it could very easily stand on it's own.  Kind of like Malbec.


Now grown extensively in CA, WA and OR.  It is one of my favorite white wines.  Lovely food wine.  And some of the best in the country is now being grown and made in Virginia.  If you get a chance to get a bottle from Horton Vineyards in Orange, VA, near Charlottesville, it is truly an eye opening experience.  But I also have not had a bad bottle of Virginia Viognier.


Jim

gmunger's picture

(post #36742, reply #72 of 77)

What many Americans fail to realize is varietally labeled wines (e.g. Viognier, Malbec, Merlot, etc.) are only required (by law) to contain 75% of the indicated varietal. So, in reality, we are often drinking "blended" wine, even though it is not labeled as such. So Gretchen's Pine Ridge Viognier/Chenin, an excellent choice by the way, used to be labeled as straight Chenin Blanc in previous vintages. It may very well have always been blended with Viognier. Since it is now labeled as a "blend", I would surmise that a) the winery has decided to blend >25% Viognier, thus precluding a strict varietal designation, probably because they knew they could make better wine this way, and b) they decided the American "consumer" would not be too confused by this. Good choice by them, IMO.


One of my favorite whites of the year was a blend of equal parts Chardonnay/Viognier/Roussanne from Washington.


As for my best contribution to Thanksgiving: 1) a bottle of dry Muscat from Trentino in northern Italy (yum), and 2) a pasture-raised bird that the hostess subsequently cooked well beyond doneness. Oh well, at least the bird had a good life, and I had some decent vino. Both of which meant I slept better that night.


 


We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.

 

We are truly what we eat, and too many people are fast, cheap and easy. Who owns your food owns you, and it is unwise to let that power rest in the hands of a very few wealthy corporations.
tones's picture

(post #36742, reply #44 of 77)

ITA!!! Yum.  Although, I do have to say that taking out all of the refrigerated dishes and organizing the warm-up plates is a task, too.  One that I will be so excited to do tomorrow.

MarineEngineer's picture

(post #36742, reply #16 of 77)

I made the stock last night as sis had no room in the fridge for the carcass. Turkey rice soup is simmering on the stove right now, as I prepare for the bus back to NYC and sis has a bunch of meals ready for the week.

Gretchen's picture

(post #36742, reply #22 of 77)

I've already done that once--at Denver DS's. Made a really big pot of vegetable soup for Sunday supper after everyone came back from the Broncoes debacle!!  I think mine is going to be a barley creation. Turkey stock is so much richer than just chicken.

Gretchen

Gretchen
MarineEngineer's picture

(post #36742, reply #28 of 77)

soup has been kid approved, so all is well in the world.

Marcia's picture

(post #36742, reply #25 of 77)

I always make extra dressing/stuffing for the leftovers. My favorite thing is dressing with my very tart cranberry sauce, and I make several meals out of just those two things. Everybody else is a little more balanced. ;-)

tones's picture

(post #36742, reply #43 of 77)

Oh, that was a really big help!  I was excited to get in here to check this site and I still have to go clean the kitchen.  We had Thanksgiving dinner tonight (Fri.) for our family.  You know, it's funny, but sometimes I actually want to clean by myself.  After concentrating and hurrying about the kitchen to get the meal ready, I just want to go at my own pace to clean up after everyone leaves. But then...now it's late and I have to go clean.

Jillsifer's picture

(post #36742, reply #5 of 77)

Brussels sprouts with chestnuts and blue cheese. Or maybe the bourbon pecan pie from The Baker's Dozen book.


The best (non-food) THING about the day, though, was learning (to my surprise) that my stepdaughter had a layover at LAX enroute from DC to Fresno. This family has NEVER gotten dressed and into the car so fast. It was a perfectly DELIGHTFUL surprise and we got to spend a terrific hour with her, drinking bad coffee and hearing about her new job.


 


 


The sole purpose of a child's middle name is so he can tell when he's REALLY in trouble.

Christmas is the season for kindling the fire of hospitality in the hall, the genial flame of charity in the heart.

-- Washington Irving

roz's picture

(post #36742, reply #8 of 77)

The Dunnes Store frozen turkey! I couldn't believe it! I could not find a fresh turkey, so had to buy a frozen bird. Spatchcocked and brined and dried out the skin. Roasted on a bed of carrots, onions and celery with about 1/2 c. of stock. Flavorful, moist and it had crunchy skin. The dark meat was cooked perfectly and the white was moist. I will do the next large pultry that way, too.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
skeptic7's picture

(post #36742, reply #17 of 77)

How did you spatchcock your turkey? How big was it?