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What is Vermouth ROSSO??

unbaked's picture

DF did the grocery shopping again, since I can only get to the store once a month. He was given a detailed list, including aisle locations, lol.


He decided to switch from the M&R Extra Dry Vermouh I listed to Martini & Rossi Rosso. "But it's vermouth, he said. "I saw the extra dry but thought this would be about the same and it was .50 less" Noooooooooooo! I figured that getting him to find Pinot Grigio would be a total loss, but he's bought vermouth so many time before,


I thought I'd seen the Rosso mentioned in a thread recently, but an advanced search brought up nothing.


What can I do with this stuff? Does it have any equivalents suitable for cooking or did I just get stuck with a bottle of the Italian version of white zin? I can't tell without opening the bottle if it's really a red or actually a rose/blend of some sort.


He came up with some new records for items that bore no resemblance to my list, the Zinfandel that morphed into some bizarre Zinfandel Peach Sangria was a real find. I can't imagine any way that could possibly be used, sigh. Maybe my father would drink it, he drinks boxed wine, maybe he'll go for it. :(


But Martini & Rossi makes a decent dry vermouth, I'd hate to throw the Rosso out, but we'd never drink it..any help would be appreciated!


TIA


'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

SallyBR1's picture

(post #33115, reply #1 of 9)

as far as I know, it is a sweeter version of vermouth - I like to drink it as an apperitif, but never used it in cooking, or in a martini. For those I prefer the white, dry vermouth.

+++++++++++++++++++++

I googled and found out that the "rosso" was the first kind of vermouth ever made. It is more herbal and sweeter - the dark color comes from caramel.

"Her shimmyshaky is much better than her chimichurri"
(Glenys, June 2006)

Edited 9/23/2006 4:34 pm by SallyBR1


Edited 9/23/2006 4:35 pm by SallyBR1

unbaked's picture

(post #33115, reply #2 of 9)

Thanks Sal, I was afraid of that. Does it look like a rose or a red? Or is the bottle color just messing with me and it's a white?

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

SallyBR1's picture

(post #33115, reply #3 of 9)

It is dark, not too dark like a port wine, but more like a light red wine

(clear as mud?)

 


 


"Her shimmyshaky is much better than her chimichurri"
(Glenys, June 2006)

deejeh's picture

(post #33115, reply #4 of 9)

As Sally says, it's a sweet vermouth.  I don't think I've ever seen a recipe that uses it, but it makes a nice aperitif, served over ice with a twist.


deej

Iguana's picture

(post #33115, reply #6 of 9)

>I don't think I've ever seen a recipe that uses it [sweet vermouth]

Time to make a round of Manhattans! Also, I second the Negroni recommendation.

Or were you talking about recipes for food?

deejeh's picture

(post #33115, reply #7 of 9)

Yes, I was thinking of food.  I'd forgotten that it was an ingredient in Negronis - it's been a very long time since I've had one.


deej

marie-louise's picture

(post #33115, reply #5 of 9)

It is a component of my favorite drink, the Negroni.

evelyn's picture

(post #33115, reply #8 of 9)

'rosso' simply means red, so you're looking for a red vermouth.

 

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
ashleyd's picture

(post #33115, reply #9 of 9)

Well he is right, it is vermouth and you can use it in recipes that call for vermouth. Obviously if you don't want to introduce colour then it's no good, but although it's sweeter than the the dry it's not amazingly so. You can also use it in recipes that call for red wine, being fortified it has a longer shelf life once opened than standard red wine.


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.