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what is GROUND RICE???

lorna's picture

A friend of mine recently gave me some old cookbooks, with some recipes dating back to over 100  years old.  A lot of these recipes call for "ground rice".  What is it, has anyone ever heard of it?   My guess is that it may be rice flour but I'm not sure.  Could I just grind some rice in my food processor, would it be the same thing?  I hope someone out there can help. 


Thanks,


Lorna

SallyBR1's picture

(post #34123, reply #1 of 14)

you can grind it in the spice grinder - a few dishes like laarb call for ground rice. It gives texture and a nice, nutty flavor.

 


 


"You don't scare me. I've got a Jack Russell and he is the Chief"

annieqst's picture

(post #34123, reply #2 of 14)

I grind rice sometimes for quick hot cereal.

butterfingers's picture

(post #34123, reply #3 of 14)

About a year ago (last Easter, actually) I made a Middle Eastern rice pudding with rose water and pistachios that called for ground rice. I used rice flour successfully. I think it is pretty much the same thing. Ground rice might be a bit coarser.

Adele's picture

(post #34123, reply #4 of 14)

From the riceassociation: 


Ground rice
is rice that has been coarsely milled. This produces rice similar to semolina and is used in baking and puddings


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

lorna's picture

(post #34123, reply #6 of 14)

Thanks for your response... Is it possible to buy ground rice, or can I grind regular rice in my food processor... and if I can, how fine should I grind it?


Thanks,


Lorna

Adele's picture

(post #34123, reply #8 of 14)

Lorna I really don't know, I found that info when I googled, I knew ground rice wasn't the same as rice flour but wanted to be sure before I posted anything.  I have rice flour in a little package, it is incredibly soft feeling.


I would certainly use my food processor if I was making a lot, I'd use a spice (coffee) grinder if making a little.  Seems it might be hard to find, plus, you could use a rice you know you like. 


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #34123, reply #9 of 14)

when my kids were babies, I ground brown rice in a (dedicated) coffee grinder for their rice cereal.

~RuthAnn
foom!


~RuthAnn

DeannaS's picture

(post #34123, reply #10 of 14)

Me too. I still do it for fast grain supplements for S. Well, usually it's millet or quinoa instead of rice these days.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

Lword's picture

(post #34123, reply #5 of 14)

It looks like you have your answer, so I'll just add that ground grains are a good addition to almost anything. Try toasting them first for a different taste. Grind to the degree you like and enjoy! Most grains are full of nutrition and have a delightful flavor. If milled to a powder, many will be an effective thickener.


Don't worry about different textures for different applications, just decide what your family likes best. I use grains and potatoes to thicken soups and have to say the toasted rice really adds flavor.


L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
chiffonade's picture

(post #34123, reply #7 of 14)

I grind rice to clean my spice grinder and never considered using it in a recipe...LOL.  Seems it would be a good way to get a somewhat coarsely ground rice without going as far as to buy rice flour which is milled much more finely.

"You can ask for cheese on your linguini with clam sauce...Just don't do it in front of me."  Mario Batali

*You're a REAL person, eat REAL food."

Chiffonade

sylvia85's picture

What is ground rice? (post #34123, reply #11 of 14)

Ground rice is exactly what it says itis.  It is no longer available in Canada, but was, back in the 50's and 60's supplied by Club House products.

It is NOT rice four, but is more like salt in texture.  I get mine from England, whenever someone is going there that I know, and ask them to bring back a pound with them.

 

The last package I received came from Sainsbury's, and the package showed that the product was 'made in france for Saisbury's, so I am about to go on line again, and try to find the producer, so that I can ask my grocer to bring it in.

The recipe I am using it for does not work very well with rice four, the texture is wrong.  It is for Bakewell Tart, also in the small form called "maid of Honour'

I hope this helps Lorna.  If I find a source, I will get back .to you!

 

Have a good day,

Sylvia

sylvia85's picture

What is ground rice? (post #34123, reply #12 of 14)

Ground rice is exactly what it says itis.  It is no longer available in Canada, but was, back in the 50's and 60's supplied by Club House products.

It is NOT rice four, but is more like salt in texture.  I get mine from England, whenever someone is going there that I know, and ask them to bring back a pound with them.

 

The last package I received came from Sainsbury's, and the package showed that the product was 'made in france for Saisbury's, so I am about to go on line again, and try to find the producer, so that I can ask my grocer to bring it in.

The recipe I am using it for does not work very well with rice four, the texture is wrong.  It is for Bakewell Tart, also in the small form called "maid of Honour'

I hope this helps Lorna.  If I find a source, I will get back .to you!

 

Have a good day,

Sylvia

sylvia85's picture

further to Gound rice queery (post #34123, reply #13 of 14)

If you own a coffee grinder and can buy basmati rice you can grind your own.  I was unable to find a contact in France.

recipe for "Maids of Honour" tarts:

using any short pastry recipe that you favour, cut out tarts into pan.   small amount of jam in the bottom of each tart followed by the following filling:

4oz. butter or hard margerine; 3/4 cup berry sugar; l beaten egg; 1/2 cup ground almonds; 1/2 cup ground rice (NOT Rice Flour)

1 tsp almond essence.     Melt the butter/Margerine, stir in sugar - cook for 1 minute; add almonds, rice, and essence, remove from heat and cool slightly, then ad the beaten egg, stirring in well. 

spoon this mixture over top of the jam, making sure to gently cover the jam.  bake in 375 degree oven fo  approximately 15 minutes. 

 

Yummy,

enjoy

Pielove's picture

tarts (post #34123, reply #14 of 14)

Hi there-- Welcome and thank you for the interesting recipe-- it looks lovely! With that small of an amount of rice, you are probably better off just grinding it yourself.

I have made ground, toasted rice as an ingredient in some Vietnamese dishes-- it adds a little thickening and a nice, roasted flavor. I bet if you toasted the rice a bit, that would be yummy in your tarts too.

Cheers, Jen