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What does ground turkey taste like?

cycler1729's picture

Is it a real substitute for ground beef if used in a meat loaf that has a lot of tomato paste? 


Thanks!

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

soupereasy's picture

(post #36416, reply #1 of 53)

I use a 3:1 ratio of turkey to beef when making meatloaf. Makes a lighter product.
I never use tomato paste in meatloaf, I prefer a bit of bloody mary mix or spicy V8.

avak123's picture

(post #36416, reply #2 of 53)

I almost always use ground turkey instead of beef in meatloaf. We love it and it helps the waistline a bit!


 

cycler1729's picture

(post #36416, reply #3 of 53)

Thanks for the response - but does it taste anything close to "real" meatloaf?

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

soupereasy's picture

(post #36416, reply #6 of 53)

That depends upon what you think of as "real" meatloaf.
I think my meatloaf is outstanding as does anyone I serve it to.

avak123's picture

(post #36416, reply #7 of 53)

I really think it tastes "real." Maybe not as fatty as ground beef, but we realy enjoy it--especially when trying to maintain healthy weeknight meals.


I will say that there is a difference between using "ground turkey" and "ground turkey breast." Guess it depends on your reason for subbing in the first place--in other words, how much healthier do you want it to be? :-)


Regular ground turkey has more fat, hence more flavor, than using just the breast.  

cycler1729's picture

(post #36416, reply #9 of 53)

I wasn't thinking so much healthier as saving money.  I don't eat a lot of meat anyway - I keep kosher and ground beef is $5.00 a pound (outrageous - I know.  You don't want to know what a roast costs!)


I see kosher ground turkey in the supermarket all of the time but I never had anyone to ask how it tasted before.  I'd love to use it for Stuffed Cabbage or sweet and sour meatballs.

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

avak123's picture

(post #36416, reply #10 of 53)

Give it a shot, I bet you like it. To best simulate beef, I would go with regular ground turkey instead of the breast.


Let me know what you think.

cycler1729's picture

(post #36416, reply #11 of 53)

I will.  Now that I've decided to buy it, I hope that they've got it.

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

dorcast's picture

(post #36416, reply #14 of 53)

I'm in the use it camp, especially in a dish that will have good flavoring from spice anyway - chili, meat sauce, etc. But I am very careful to buy ground turkey, which has both dark and light meat, as opposed to ground turkey breast, which I find completely dry and tasteless.

cycler1729's picture

(post #36416, reply #15 of 53)

I was able to buy it today but interestingly the price of kosher ground turkey (Empire Brand) is almost the same as beef - $4.50 a pound.


I am going to freeze it in individual servings because I won't be preparing it until next week but I will let you know then.

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

soupereasy's picture

(post #36416, reply #16 of 53)

You are setting yourself up to be disappointed! I assume you mean that you will be freezing the raw turkey? Correct me if I am wrong.


If you are talking about making up the meatloaf or whatever and then freezing, I know you will have a better result.

 I keep raw prepared meatloaves (loafs) in the freezer. I roll them in a size appropriate for my need.
cycler1729's picture

(post #36416, reply #17 of 53)

I was going to because the sell by date is 9/23.  I guess that I'll prepare it this week, then and freeze it after it's cooked.


It will be ok unopened in the refrigerator until Friday, right?

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

cycler1729's picture

(post #36416, reply #29 of 53)

Wow!  It was great!  I was really shocked.


I cooked my Sweet and Sour Meatballs and except for the fact that I cooked it a little too long and most of the sauce was cooked out (I'll know better next time) the Meatballs absorbed the flavors and I really wasn't able to tell the difference.


I didn't add anything to the Meatballs themselves because I had nothing to add (I thought that I had 2 new jars of garlic powder but they were nowhere to be seen) but the sauce is Rokeach Tomato Mushroom sauce, apples, raisins, cabbage, lemon juice and a little bit of sugar.


I used to put chopped onions in the Meatballs but I'm not permitted to eat them now so I was thinking of using those onion flakes but I don't know if the'll be the same.

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

Gretchen's picture

(post #36416, reply #30 of 53)

Glad you do like it. I prefer it for meatloaf any more, and it makes a pretty good burger. I think it has a "sweetness" flavor to it.

Gretchen

Gretchen
cycler1729's picture

(post #36416, reply #31 of 53)

Yes, and it is a lot lighter.  Since it absorbs flavors so well, I think that meatloaf ought to be just as great.

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

Gretchen's picture

(post #36416, reply #32 of 53)

I have made Thai meatballs with it also. Chili, spaghetti sauce, it all works.

Gretchen

Gretchen
soupereasy's picture

(post #36416, reply #33 of 53)

Let us not forget white bean chile. A real showcase for turkey.:)

Gretchen's picture

(post #36416, reply #34 of 53)

Could be. I make it with chicken--just finished some, and it was GOOD.

Gretchen

Gretchen
avak123's picture

(post #36416, reply #35 of 53)

I am so happy to hear it turned out well. I guess one advantage of turkey is in its ability to serve as a blank palette for other flavors.

cycler1729's picture

(post #36416, reply #38 of 53)

I was only able to get about 20 small meatballs out of a pound of the ground turkey, though.  Do you add an egg to yours to give it "hold"?


I was also thinking of adding rice as a filler like some people add to the meat in stuffed cabbage.  What do you think?

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My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything. The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library. —Peter Golkin

Gretchen's picture

(post #36416, reply #39 of 53)

I make meat balls pretty much from my meatloaf mix.  Needs some binder, or else it will be dry--even the non-white meat turkey.


 


Gretchen
Gretchen
avak123's picture

(post #36416, reply #40 of 53)

Regarding adding egg, yes I do when making meatloaf or meatballs--it adds a little sticking power. Also, it adds a bit of protien and stretches your protein $$$ a bit further.


Regarding rice...I am not a huge rice fan for meatballs or meatloaf. If I want to add filler, I generally would add breadcrumbs. I don't think rice would be "bad," just changes the texture a bit and something that I generally don't think about!


 

Gretchen's picture

(post #36416, reply #12 of 53)

I know I've already lauded it, but it really is good. Use it for chili, meat balls, spagetti sauce--anywhere you use ground beef. It even makes a very nice burger.  Our ground turkey is finely ground, so that may be a bit of a texture difference for you. 

Gretchen

Gretchen
Adele's picture

(post #36416, reply #13 of 53)

but does it taste anything close to "real" meatloaf?


Like anything, you'll have those that like it and those that don't.  I'm strongly in the don't column.  I think ground turkey has no flavor and why bother unless it's a health issue? 


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

chiquiNO's picture

(post #36416, reply #5 of 53)

Giada loves it too!!

Chiqui from way down yonder in New Orleans

 

avak123's picture

(post #36416, reply #8 of 53)

She does, doesn't she? I have seen her make stuffed peppers and zukes with it.


In fact, we had turkey stuffed peppers tonight--not Giada's version--basically my turkey meatloaf in a pepper.  

Gretchen's picture

(post #36416, reply #4 of 53)

I can't answer your question as you pose it , but I use it all the time for 100% meat loaf. I use it all the time for taco meat. I use it for spagetti sauce.


It's flavor is meaty, but 'sweet" in a way. I love it and no longer use beef.


Does it taste like beef? Maybe better? Try it , you'll like it


 


Gretchen


Edited 9/16/2008 9:17 pm ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
MrBill's picture

(post #36416, reply #18 of 53)

c,


 We use it pretty regularly. It is fine in meatloaf, but we put lots of other "stuff" in our meatloaf so you dont really notice. I will say that there is no comparison to a beef burger though we do make turkey ones fairly often too. They just need a lot more seasoning. The turkey is great in spaghetti sauce, tacos, stuffed peppers etc. 


Bill Koustenis


Advanced Automotive Machine


Waldorf Md

Bill Koustenis

Advanced Automotive Machine

Waldorf Md

kathymcmo's picture

(post #36416, reply #19 of 53)

Each time I read this thread I'm half expecting someone to answer the thread title question with the ol' cliche about exotic meats: "You know, it tastes like chicken."

whatscooking's picture

(post #36416, reply #20 of 53)

I like turkey for meatballs, meatloaf and burgers.  I also have used it with sloppy joe's.  I call 'em turkey joes and they're pretty good.  But for some reason, I'm not crazy about substituting ground turkey for beef in chili.  In that dish, I miss that beefy tasty.  So I think it all depends on your taste.  One thing I don't like is ground turkey breast, that is just too bland.  I like the 93% lean kind.    There's a recipe for turkey tacos in this month's issue of FC.  I haven't tried it yet, but plan to soon.  Thanks for that, editors.  I'm the one always begging for turkey recipes.  Oh, and the Middle Eastern Turkey burgers from a couple issues back are REALLY good.  Definitely give those a try. 


Keep a green tree in your heart and
perhaps a singing bird will come
- Chinese proverb

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/