NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

watermelon, 14 cents a pound

evelyn's picture

or 19 (euro) cents a kilo...best price yet, this summer. The only problem, these babies were HUGE. The one I just brought home (all were basically the same size) weighed in at 12.285 kg (or 27 lbs). Good thing we love watermelon!

Watermelon salad...grilled watermelon...plain watermelon for fruit eating...what else?

And what's the price over your way?

Children are unpredictable. You never know what inconsistency they're going to catch you in next.

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
Syrah's picture

(post #37709, reply #1 of 53)

What does a 12 kilo watermelon look like? That's astounding.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained."
-Marie Curie
My perseverance will be rewarded.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

evelyn's picture

(post #37709, reply #3 of 53)

it's big, really big - and you don't want to see my poor fingers from carrying that baby from supermarket to home in a plastic (eco-friendly) bag. :-(

Children are unpredictable. You never know what inconsistency they're going to catch you in next.

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
Ozark's picture

(post #37709, reply #2 of 53)

 



Watermelon Honey (Watermelon Rind Preserve)
[ Wassermelonenschalenmarmelade ]
Wassermelonenschalenmarmelade

300 g watermelon rind
30-90 g water
90-150 g caster sugar
1-2 lemons or limes, juice only
1 pinch of salt
5 cm ginger, coarsely chopped

Remove all green outer skin and all red flesh from the watermelon rind. Using a food processor, reduce the white rind to very small pieces, but do not puree. Put with water in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, cover and cook for 15-20 minutes. Add lemon juice, sugar, salt and ginger. Bring to a boil again, cover and simmer for 45 minutes. Uncover and cook for a few minutes more, until the liquid thickens like syrup. Remove the ginger. Fill into jars and seal.

 


Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

 

Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

evelyn's picture

(post #37709, reply #4 of 53)

oh wow! I know I'm going to love this - it has ginger in it! Thanks. I am so making this. :-)

Children are unpredictable. You never know what inconsistency they're going to catch you in next.

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
Gretchen's picture

(post #37709, reply #5 of 53)

Have you ever had watermelon rind pickle?  It is really good--a southern "staple" on the sunday dinner table.  I, too, have a watermelon. Maybe I'll make some also. The ginger is a nice addition.


HOwever, all I have ever seen is done in chunks. This is interesting.


Gretchen


Edited 7/21/2009 7:56 am ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
evelyn's picture

(post #37709, reply #6 of 53)

I haven't, although I've certainly heard about it. I really like the looks of this recipe - reminds me of a greek spoon sweet, only better.

Children are unpredictable. You never know what inconsistency they're going to catch you in next.

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
Gretchen's picture

(post #37709, reply #7 of 53)

Maybe because I've never had it anyway but chunks, I can't quite think I'll like it this way. It would be easier to use--with the chunks you have to cut it and put it on whatever you are eating it with.

Gretchen

Gretchen
mireillec's picture

(post #37709, reply #8 of 53)

Ozark,
Did you try this recipe? Seems good.

Ozark's picture

(post #37709, reply #9 of 53)

A friend made it and gave me the recipe. I was very good.

 


Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

 

Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

evelyn's picture

(post #37709, reply #13 of 53)

I'll bet you were! :-)

Children are unpredictable. You never know what inconsistency they're going to catch you in next.

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
Ozark's picture

(post #37709, reply #16 of 53)

More I think about it, might not work on the grill. Guess I will try as written in the oven.

 


Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

 

Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

leonap's picture

(post #37709, reply #10 of 53)

Grilled watermelon? I googled and found someone say they basted with honey before grilling. Is that how you do it?

I don't have a recipe for you but maybe watermelon salsa?

Ozark's picture

(post #37709, reply #12 of 53)

I had never thought about grilling it till I saw this one at Tastespotting last week. Sounds wonderful, going to try it.


http://ravenouscouple.blogspot.com/2009/07/watermelon-steak-or-seared-ahi-tuna.html


 


 


Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

 

Growing old is inevitable, growing up is optional!

leonap's picture

(post #37709, reply #17 of 53)

I will be interested in your results. Roasting it for 2 1/2 hours at 350 degrees does not tempt me yet.

evelyn's picture

(post #37709, reply #14 of 53)

I just brush it lightly with balsamico and serve with feta, but the recipe just posted sure looks good!

Children are unpredictable. You never know what inconsistency they're going to catch you in next.

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
leonap's picture

(post #37709, reply #18 of 53)

Sounds good. I think I'll try some with honey and some with balsamico.

RuthWells's picture

(post #37709, reply #11 of 53)

Sorbet?

Our dog loves to eat the rinds -- I figure it can't be bad for him!

Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw


www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com



www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

evelyn's picture

(post #37709, reply #15 of 53)

sorbet is always good. :-)

Children are unpredictable. You never know what inconsistency they're going to catch you in next.

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
evelyn's picture

(post #37709, reply #19 of 53)

oh, I make that up all the time! Thanks for reminding me. I think I know it as 'Agua Fresca'.

Children are unpredictable. You never know what inconsistency they're going to catch you in next.

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
madnoodle's picture

(post #37709, reply #20 of 53)

I made a yummy watermelon-feta salad last year.  As far as I can remember, it featured watermelon, feta, lime juice, fresh mint, and a bit of olive oil.  It was delicious, and if I could just buy a decent watermelon, I'd make it again.


Yesterday I made watermelon popsicles out of yet another mealy melon.  I got the idea from the most recent Food and Wine.  I whizzed melon chunks with a couple of Tbsp. of sugar, a pinch of salt, mint leaves, and lemon rind (I'd use lime next time) and then put into popsicle molds. 


My kids also really like watermelon lemonade--just puree lemonade with watermelon, in whatever proportions you like.


What if there were no hypothetical questions?


 

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

wonka's picture

(post #37709, reply #21 of 53)

We had the most amazing tasting watermelon tonight. I have had many, as you describe yours, but this time I got lucky. Yum.

madnoodle's picture

(post #37709, reply #23 of 53)

You are so lucky.  Every single watermelon I've bought this year has been a lemon, so to speak. 

What if there were no hypothetical questions?


 

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #37709, reply #25 of 53)

That is amazing. I honestly don't think I have ever seen a bad watermelon--honestly.  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
madnoodle's picture

(post #37709, reply #27 of 53)

Really?  Maybe I'm just fussy.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?


 

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #37709, reply #28 of 53)

Hmmmm. What does that say about me?   I have just not seen a "mealy" watermelon. I do think I know what watermelon should be.

Gretchen

Gretchen
madnoodle's picture

(post #37709, reply #30 of 53)

Maybe I need to move to your neck of the woods, or get a lesson on picking a good melon.  It seems to me that when they genetically engineered the seeds out of watermelon, they wrecked the texture.  The only good ones I've had this year have been the mini ones--but they cost a fortune, and only last about half an hour in our house.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?


 

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Astrid's picture

(post #37709, reply #32 of 53)

Thump the middle of the watermelon with your middle knuckle, with your palm up.
Choose the one that has the best big hollow sound. They are the ripest and sweetest.
I love just a plain wedge of watermelon with fresh lime juice squirted over it, yum!

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson


Edited 7/22/2009 3:17 pm by Astrid

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
madnoodle's picture

(post #37709, reply #33 of 53)

I'll try that next time.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?


 

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

TracyK's picture

(post #37709, reply #35 of 53)

I heard something on NPR about watermelons a couple weeks ago, they said that, counter to what most of us usually hear about picking watermelons, you should pick one that's lighter for its size, as the flavor will be more concentrated. I think it was part of a feature on gardening with less water, which yields smaller but more tasty produce.


"Attend to the details. Teach your children manners. Write cogent paragraphs. Drive carefully. And make a good potato salad, one with some crunch, maybe accompanied by a fried drumstick with crackly skin -- the humble potato and the stupid chicken, ennobled by diligent cooking -- and is this not the meaning of our beautiful country, to take what is common and enable it to become beautiful?"

                                                            -- Garrison Keillor

madnoodle's picture

(post #37709, reply #37 of 53)

Well now that's interesting, and counter intuitive.  OK, I'm going to thump, heft, turn around three times and throw salt over my shoulder next time I pick out a melon.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?


 

What if there were no hypothetical questions?