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brownbagg's picture

How do you make tomato sauce from home grown tomatos?

Gretchen's picture

(post #37702, reply #1 of 67)

A sauce I have been making for a couple of years is to roast tomatoes on a bed of onions, and maybe a carrot. Then I puree it with a stick blender. It makes a lucious and rich tasting sauce.


Otherwise you can just simmer and run through a food mill.


Gretchen
Gretchen
MadMom's picture

(post #37702, reply #7 of 67)

I love your roasted tomato sauce.  In fact, I bought about 16 Roma tomatoes today at Costco simply to roast and make some tomato sauce of.  I can already imagine how good it is.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Gretchen's picture

(post #37702, reply #9 of 67)

It's good with regular tomatoes too, this time of year.  ;o)


Gretchen
Gretchen
Lee's picture

(post #37702, reply #10 of 67)

We aren't getting home grown tomatoes yet!  The weather has been so stinky so far this summer, wet and cold, that the corn and tomatoes are about 3 weeks late.  I tried some greenhouse grown tomatoes from the fm, but they aren't much.  I'm still buying grape tomatoes from the grocery store.  :(

Gretchen's picture

(post #37702, reply #12 of 67)

We have a cherry tomato vine gone wild!! I will never have to buy another again, and these are sweet as sugar. LOVE them.


The heirlooms are selling for $0.79/lb.!!  So meaty and good also. We are in need of rain now, but it seems to be about right for the tomatoes.  Local corn has been in but my time hasn't been right to do anything with it yet. Hope I don't wait too long.


We have some zucchini vines, and one, in particular, from DD that looks like it is on steroids!!  I think I will really finally try to do some squash blossoms--maybe for DS's birthday dinner.


Gretchen
Gretchen
MadMom's picture

(post #37702, reply #13 of 67)

Want me to bring my deer over?  LOL!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Lee's picture

(post #37702, reply #14 of 67)

$.79 a pound?!!!  They're never less than $3 here, usually closer to $4 and sometimes over $4.  Regular field tomatoes never go below $1.49 a pound, even at the height of the season.


Edited 7/20/2009 6:59 pm ET by lee

Jean's picture

(post #37702, reply #15 of 67)

Yes, I could cry too!


Sometimes I wonder--why is that Frisbee getting bigger?--and then it hits me.



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Gretchen's picture

(post #37702, reply #16 of 67)

Ya need to move closer to the land.


It is what they are selling for.  Not all kinds, but great cherokees. Sorry.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Lee's picture

(post #37702, reply #17 of 67)

Cherokees are one of my favorites.  Maybe by the end of August. Sigh.

charly's picture

(post #37702, reply #36 of 67)

How do you plan on cooking the zucchini flowers?  I tried some the other day like my grandfather use to do.....dipped in egg, then flour and fried in olive oil.  do you have another suggestion?  I have lbs of flowers in the garden with no fruit atttached!  First time for me to plant zucchini.....I planted 8 plants :). It's everywhere, trellis, cages and ground cover.   More flowers than zucchini! Next time I'll only plant 2.   

Lee's picture

(post #37702, reply #37 of 67)

I wish I had your problem!  I bought zucchini blossoms this morning at the fm.  I'm going to make a risotto tonight with fresh vegetables and will add the torn blossoms at the end.  You can fill the blossoms with diced mozzarella, with or without any other additions like capers, chopped oven dried tomatoes, herbs, dip them in batter and fry, or you might try one of my favorite recipes.  It's from one of Mario Batali's cookbooks.  I use fresh, cow's mik ricotta.  Add the tomato salad and a slice of bruschetta on the plate and you've got a little bit of heaven.


Fried Zucchini Flowers with Buffalo Ricotta


Serves:  4 servings



  • 1 cup fresh buffalo ricotta (cow's milk is an acceptable substitute)

  • 1 egg

  • 2 scallions, thinly sliced

  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

  • Salt and pepper, to taste

  • 12 zucchini flowers, stamens removed

  • 1 pound fresh golden tomatoes, roughly chopped, or golden cherry tomatoes, cut in half

  • 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

  • 8 leaves basil

  • 8 leaves opal basil

  • 1 teaspoon salt

Directions


In a medium bowl, combine the ricotta, egg, scallion, nutmeg and salt and pepper to taste. Using a small teaspoon, stuff each blossom with 1 1/2 teaspoons of the filling and set aside.


In a medium bowl, place the tomatoes and toss with the 2 tablespoons olive oil, basil and salt and pepper, to taste, and set aside.


In a 10 to 12-inch saute pan, heat the remaining 1/2 cup olive oil over high heat until smoking. Place 4 flowers at a time into the pan and cook until golden brown on both sides.


Arrange 3 blossoms on each plate, pile some of the dressed tomatoes in the center of each plate, tear the basil leaves over the plates, sprinkle with salt and serve immediately.

charly's picture

(post #37702, reply #38 of 67)

You have solved my "what's for dinner?" dilemna.  tomatoes and basil from the garden.  Off to buy the ricotta and bread!   

Gretchen's picture

(post #37702, reply #62 of 67)

That looks good. We have just come back home to our "squash that ate Charlotte" plant!! 


I have never done this, Lee, so I guess you wrap the filling in the blossom and "enclose" it well?  I have LOTS of blossoms, and they are HUGE to boot. One squash plant has a squash on it--DD gave us the seeds and it is one that grows in a circle and is about 12" in diameter! I'm going to take a picture and will post. Have NO idea how to cook it!!


Has anyone ever stuffed cucumber blossoms?


Gretchen
Gretchen
Lee's picture

(post #37702, reply #65 of 67)

I twist the ends of the blossoms if they are flaccid enough, otherwise you just press them together as best you can.  They stay closed pretty well as long as you don't overfill them.


You can use goat cheese or a mix of ricotta and goat cheese, or ricotta, feta and parm.  I bought a small bunch yesterday at the fm, but I just dipped them in beer batter and fried them.  We had them with a glass of wine before dinner.  Sooo good.


Here's another excellent recipe:


Squash Blossoms Stuffed with Herbed Cheese in Fritter Batter


This dish naturally evolved out of ingredients purchased one afternoon in an open-air market -- beautiful fresh goat cheeses and several different tapenades. I've since lightened the goat cheese mixture with ricotta. The tapenade should be served as a small garnish on the side, a complementary taste rather than a big spoonful.


·        1/2 cup unbleached all-purpose flour


·        1/4 cup cornstarch


·        1 extra-large egg, separated (the white should be chilled)


·        1/2 cup very cold beer


·        6 tablespoons high-quality ricotta


·        6 tablespoons soft goat cheese


·        1 teaspoon minced shallot


·        3 tablespoons minced fresh chives


·        3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley


·        3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh chervil


·        Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper


·        1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice


·        20 large squash blossoms


·        4 cups vegetable oil for deep-frying


·        1/4 cup Green Olive Tapenade (page 25; optional)


1. To make the batter, mix the flour and cornstarch in a bowl. In another bowl, beat the egg white and beer together. Stir this into the flour mixture. Do not overbeat, or the batter will be tough; there should still be some lumps. Cover and refrigerate (it can rest, chilled, up to 2 hours) while you make the stuffing.


2. Mix the cheeses in a bowl with the egg yolk, shallot, and herbs. Season with salt and pepper and 1 teaspoon of the lemon juice.


3. Carefully pry apart the petals of each blossom. Remove the stamen. Place a small spoonful of the cheese mixture inside each blossom and gently twist the tips of the blossoms shut.


4. Heat the vegetable oil in a large deep pot over medium heat to 350 degrees F. Use a deep-fry thermometer to check the temperature.


5. Remove the batter from the refrigerator and stir it once. Dip the blossoms into the batter, then carefully lower them into the hot oil. Fry them in batches until they are golden brown and crisp, 3 to 5 minutes.


6. Divide the blossoms among four warm plates. Drizzle with the remaining 2 teaspoons lemon juice. Garnish each plate with spoonful of tapenade, if using, and serve.


 


Makes 4 servings


 


From In the Hands of a Chef by Jody Adams and Ken Rivard.


 

MadMom's picture

(post #37702, reply #11 of 67)

Didn't know that, but I love it any way!  The thing I really like is that you can put in onions, carrots, green peppers, garlic, whatever you have laying around, and it all makes a lovely sauce.  I may make some tomorrow.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

SuB's picture

(post #37702, reply #18 of 67)

Gretchen, could you give a novice please a bit more detail on how you do your roasted tomatoes & onions?  At what oven temp and for roughly how long do you roast them?  How much onion do you use - about 50/50 onion/tomatoes? Do you add olive oil?  Garlic?  Salt?


I realize it isn't an exact science but I'd love to try this.  I've never done anything like it so I'd feel better if I had a little more info.  Thanks!



Cheers, Sue B.


The older I get, the better I was.

Cheers, Sue B.

The older I get, the better I was.

Gretchen's picture

(post #37702, reply #19 of 67)

I'm pretty sure this is a Martha recipe. I used good summer tomatoes, and sliced them in thick slices, not just in half. I don't think I even bothered to pull off the skins.  Hope this helps.


Roasted tomato sauce--fresh tomatoes


Makes 4 1/4 cups

3 pounds tomatoes, (beefsteak or plum)


1 medium onion, halved and sliced 1/4 inch thick


2 carrots, sliced into 1/4-inch rounds


4 garlic cloves, (peeled)


1/2 teaspoon dried thyme


2 tablespoons olive oil


Coarse salt and ground pepper


Directions


Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Use a sharp paring knife to core the tomatoes. Cut tomatoes in half; transfer to one large (or two smaller) rimmed baking sheet; add onion, carrots, garlic, and thyme.


Toss tomato mixture with oil; season generously with salt and pepper. Spread in a single layer (turn tomatoes cut side down). Roast until tender, 45 minutes to 1 hour. If vegetables begin to brown too quickly, push them toward the center of the sheet.


Using tongs or your fingers, peel off tomato skins; discard. Transfer mixture (including juices) to a blender; pulse several times, until chunky. Let cool completely; transfer to an airtight container. Refrigerate up to 1 week, or freeze up to 3 months (thaw before using).


Gretchen
Gretchen
sally ryan's picture

(post #37702, reply #20 of 67)

Thanks Gretchen, I'll give it a go this wknd too.  I never peel tomatoes for sauce.  I just give them a going over with my hand blender once they're soft.

brownbagg's picture

(post #37702, reply #21 of 67)

I am really a basic beginner, I need more data. How do you get from chunky to creamy. also how do you tell if tomatoes are cooked enough.

Here the deal my neighbor has two hands of green thumbs, I get about a five gallon bucket of tomatoes a week free. It just so many hamburgers you can eat. I like to learn to make a homemade spaghetti sauce without all the oil, salt and sugar. Just for me. So I was looking for a basic tomato sauce to begin with. just cannot figure how to get from tomatoes to sauce.

Gretchen's picture

(post #37702, reply #22 of 67)

Did you see my post? It tells you how to make a tomato sauce. From there you can add other herbs and make some spagetti sauce or such.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Jean's picture

(post #37702, reply #23 of 67)

And Sally BR makes an uncooked sauce on her latest blog.


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com/


I haven't tried it--still waiting for some decent tomatoes--but it looks delicious.



Sometimes I wonder--why is that Frisbee getting bigger?--and then it hits me.



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Lee's picture

(post #37702, reply #25 of 67)

We love uncooked tomato sauce and I make it often once the garden tomatoes come in (will they ever this year?).  I don't peel or seed the tomatoes, just dice them, dump them in a bowl with torn basil leaves, a glug of evoo and s&p.  It really does taste better if the sauce is allowed to sit for a few hours.  We add red chili flakes and grated parm at the table.  Heaven in a bowl!

Jean's picture

(post #37702, reply #26 of 67)

I don't think there will be any garden tomatoes this year. I'm depressed.


Sometimes I wonder--why is that Frisbee getting bigger?--and then it hits me.



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
cookgreen's picture

(post #37702, reply #39 of 67)

Why no tomatoes, I'm getting scared! I have LOTS of green tomatoes but our temps are so below normal, will they not ripen? All I'm eating so far is very few orange cherry tomatoes. I just feasted on about 4 of them before DH set on the irrigation but as I checked closely I was wondering when the next ones would be ready. Tons of basil but no tomatoes, go figure?

Jean's picture

(post #37702, reply #40 of 67)

at least you have basil. My crop is a dismal failure this year.


Sometimes I wonder--why is that Frisbee getting bigger?--and then it hits me.



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
cookgreen's picture

(post #37702, reply #41 of 67)

I do think I'm cheating just a bit, using a hybrid, African Blue, for about half my crop. It's a green type with bluish undertones, doesn't taste quite as sweet and tender fresh, but still makes an awesome pesto. Lemon basil is my favourite from seed.

Today at work I made 4 lbs into pesto with a new blade in FP, it took just seconds compared to a minute or more with the old one. I couldn't get over the look and taste too, seems like it got cut rather than just mashed, what a difference!

Jean's picture

(post #37702, reply #42 of 67)

Well, I'm jealous.  It never warmed up enough to get my seeds started and the plants we bought were hit with a blight of some kind.  Very pathetic. I'm not familiar with African Blue. I'll have to google.


That looks like a beautiful plant. I wonder if i could keep cuttings going over winter.  Hmmm.



Sometimes I wonder--why is that Frisbee getting bigger?--and then it hits me.



http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/


Edited 7/28/2009 10:22 pm ET by Jean

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Gary's picture

(post #37702, reply #43 of 67)

This is the first year I've tried basil and I thought I had a black thumb. "Glad" to see I'm not alone.

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

Risottogirl's picture

(post #37702, reply #44 of 67)

I think it is a bad year for some things. I'm not known for my green thumb, but I keep trying :)


My basil is dismal this year and that is one thing I have always been able to grow.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay