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tomatillos

pamilyn's picture

tomatillos (post #31574)

I just picked two five gallon buckets of these. HELP...any tried and true. I am going to make some of Bayless tomatillo chipotle salsa, but that won't put a dent in these. Can I freeze them? What do I do with them after that??? LOL Pamilyn


Deanna and Elizabeth..do you want some???


The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

DeannaS's picture

(post #31574, reply #1 of 28)

Yum! I'd take some. I have a good tomatillo salsa recipe at home. (No chipotles in that one, so it could be different than the one you're making.)

Maybe we could can em?

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

MadMom's picture

(post #31574, reply #2 of 28)

They make a nice salsa verde, which you could can.  If you want the recipe, let me know.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Aberwacky's picture

(post #31574, reply #3 of 28)

I'll vouch for your canned salsa verde.


I was hoping to make some with my crop this year, but the bugs got ALL of them. 


Leigh


 


I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers). . .

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
pamilyn's picture

(post #31574, reply #5 of 28)

yes please...can I freeze it??

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

MadMom's picture

(post #31574, reply #6 of 28)

Here it is...I've never frozen it, but it cans nicely.


Salsa Verde


2 lbs tomatillos, husked, washed, and quartered


5 Hatch chiles, seeded and chopped in large dice (use Anaheims if you can't find Hatch)


1 large onion, chopped in large dice


2 tsp garlic


2 cups chicken stock


1 large bunch cilantro, washed and chopped


salt and pepper to taste


 


Save two or three tomatillos and about half a chile pepper, along with about 1/3 of the cilantro. Put all remaining ingredients into a large saucepan and cook over medium high heat until soft. Add reserved tomatillos, chile peppers, and cilantro, and puree in batches. Place into sterile jars.


Serve as a sauce for fish, poultry, or meat, or as a sauce for enchiladas. Enjoy!




Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

pamilyn's picture

(post #31574, reply #7 of 28)

Thanks, how do I process this? Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

MadMom's picture

(post #31574, reply #9 of 28)

Sorry - forgot to add that.  You can obviously put a small amount in the sterile jars and keep in the fridge until you use it, but I use a normal canning procedure.  Place the salsa into sterile jars, put the flat pieces on, then the rings, just finger tight.  Put into boiling water to cover by about 1" and let boil for ten minutes.  I then take them out, make sure each of the flat pieces pops, then you can tighten the rings or remove them.  (I leave them on, but that's just me.)  Obviously, this recipe can be doubled or tripled if you have a lot of tomatillos to use.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

pamilyn's picture

(post #31574, reply #11 of 28)

Thanks...Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

whatscooking's picture

(post #31574, reply #4 of 28)

I love Bayless' tomatillo-chipotle salsa.  And also his Roasted Tomatillo serrano salsa.  The latter is great, if you just freeze the puree of tomatillo, garlic and serranos.  When you are ready to use it, defrost and add the onion and cilantro.  This works beautifully. 


Also good is his Essential Simmered Tomatillo sauce, a cooked sauce best used for saucing enchiladas and such.  This also freezes nicely, minus the cilantro, of course.

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
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ashleyd's picture

(post #31574, reply #8 of 28)

Oh how I love the "excess society". Plant it, grow it, harvest it and then wonder what you're going to do with the bounty!


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

pamilyn's picture

(post #31574, reply #10 of 28)

LOL, I only planted two plants, I had NO idea how prolific they would be!! Deanna came to my work and took one five gallon bucket. She is going to make some salsa, I will make something else and then we will share. Good idea. Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

ashleyd's picture

(post #31574, reply #12 of 28)

My fingers obviously aren't as green as yours!


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

DeannaS's picture

(post #31574, reply #16 of 28)

We have now husked all 15 or so pounds, and decided that we need to do more than just sals. So, we found this recipe and made it for dinner - twas yummy!

Tomatillo Chicken Soup
INGREDIENTS:

* 2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves - pounded thin
* 3 tablespoons olive oil
* 1 onion, chopped
* 3 cloves garlic, minced
* 1 pound chopped tomatillos
* 2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and minced
* 4 cups chicken stock
* 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
* 1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sauce
* 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
* 1/4 cup sour cream (optional)
* salt to taste
* ground black pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS:

1. Heat oil over high heat in a large saucepan or Dutch oven. Saute chicken in oil until both sides are browned, approximately 2 minutes per side. Remove the chicken, and set aside.
2. Add onions and garlic to saucepan, and saute until golden. Stir in the tomatillos, jalapeno peppers, and broth. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover the pot, and simmer for about 15 minutes.
3. Puree vegetables in batches in a blender or food processor. Return to pot, and reheat. At this point taste the soup; if not piquant enough, add cayenne pepper or pepper sauce.
4. Slice the chicken into thin slices, and then shred. Stir into soup. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
5. When ready to serve, stir in the minced cilantro and ladle into bowls. Put a dollop of sour cream on top of each portion, and let it melt a bit. Top each dollop with a single cilantro leaf, and serve immediately.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

pamilyn's picture

(post #31574, reply #17 of 28)

Sounds good. It would be good with a few of those corn tortilla chips you turned me on to crumbled on top. Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

MadMom's picture

(post #31574, reply #18 of 28)

...or just cut corn tortillas into strips (about 1/4" wide) and fry them quickly.  Makes a great garnish.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

DeannaS's picture

(post #31574, reply #19 of 28)

Yep, that's how we ate it. Okay, we had cheapo tortilla chips, cause that's what we had in the house. But, you get the idea.

I just went out a bought all the ingredients to make salsa. Whew! This is gonna be a lot of salsa. Maybe I should have bought quart jars instead of pints. ;)

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

pamilyn's picture

(post #31574, reply #21 of 28)

Yeah, thanks for taking some of them off my hands. We went to the mexican grocery on Thursday and got some cool peppers. Hope my stuff turns out O.K. I think I will work on it tomorrow. Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

DeannaS's picture

(post #31574, reply #26 of 28)

10 pints of sauce are canned. Elizaram took about a pound off my hands, and I still have about a pound left. Bread with them? That sounds interesting.....

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

Aberwacky's picture

(post #31574, reply #13 of 28)

I can completely understand Pamilyn's situation. 


Gardening for me can be a bit unpredictable-one year two squash plants produce enough to feed my neighbors, the next year both die before making a single fruit.  So, I plant a little extra to cover the unknowns, and when weather, soil and plant cooperate I have a bounty to share. 


Or we eat a lot of squash.


Leigh


 


I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers). . .

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
ashleyd's picture

(post #31574, reply #15 of 28)

Unreliability of production from the home garden? I can understand that. I suppose I'm relating to the production of friends and family who would "suddenly" be presented with a glut of fine produce...year after year! Personally I've given up growing stuff, primarily because I'm useless at it, I'd rather cook it than grow it, and secondly because I can get all the home produce I can cope with from those folks who have "far too much to use for themselves"!


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Syb's picture

(post #31574, reply #14 of 28)

I have roasted (or toasted) them, that is, cooked and blackened them by cooking in a dry cast iron skillet over high heat.  They're cooked, so it doesn't hurt to freeze them.  Make salsa or a green enchilada sauce later.  I don't remember where I read about doing that before using them.  It's supposed to enhance the flavor.  Does anyone else do that?  I like using raw ones too, but a combination of the two is nice.

venturedone's picture

(post #31574, reply #20 of 28)

I also have a plethora of tomatillos, plus some lovely little hot peppers.  I plan to work on developing a tomatillo/ chili bread this week (emphasis on the "plan").

 


Harebrained lagomorph, prestidigitations exist for pre-adolescents.

 

Harebrained lagomorph, prestidigitations exist for pre-adolescents.

ouzo's picture

(post #31574, reply #22 of 28)

Pamilyn


I found this recipe at the Helsing Junction Farm website.  I have not tried it.  Might just be a variation of other salsa recipes already posted:



Roasted Tomatillio Salsa with Ancho Chiles:


-Place a cast iron pan over medium heat.


-Add one 3-inch long dried ancho chile and toast, turning once until fragrant, about 2 minutes.


-Transfer the chile to a bowl and cover it with hot tap water, soaking for 30 minutes.


-Add 2 unpeeled garlic cloves to the hot pan, turning occasionally until the skins blacken, about 5 minutes. -Remove the garlic and set aside to cool.


-Preheat the broiler. Place 1# of husked and rinsed tomatillios (half a bag) on a baking sheet and broil, turning occasionally until the skins blacken in spots, about 8 minutes. Set aside to cool.


-When the chile has softened, drain it ad remove the stem and seeds. Place it in a food processor along with the peeled garlic and half the tomatillios.


-Puree until smooth, add the remaining tomatillios and pulse once or twice to form a chunky salsa.


-Put the salsa in a bowl, and add ½ bunch finely minced cilantro and ½ tsp salt.

 

  No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted - Aesop, The Lion & the mouse

pamilyn's picture

(post #31574, reply #23 of 28)

Thanks much, can't have too many tomatillo recipes :)  Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

Wolvie's picture

(post #31574, reply #24 of 28)

this is my all time favorite use of tomatillos:


Chile Verde

2 lbs. lean pork, cubed, and cooked into carnitas
1/2 cup chicken stock
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 onion, chopped
10 diced tomatillos
1 tsp. ground coriander (toasted)
4 anaheim or similiar green chiles
2 Tbsp. chopped fresh cilantro
1-2 fresh jalapeno peppers, finely diced, to taste
Dash salt and pepper 


Saute onion until translucent. Add tomatillo and chiles. Add chopped fresh jalapenos, a little at a time, to taste. Add the sauted mix to the carnitas, then the chicken stock ( might need more to make the consistency you desire, say a soup)

Cover and simmer for 30-40 minutes to let the flavors meld. Just before serving, add chopped cilantro, salt and pepper to taste. Can be made into burritos or served in bowl with flour tortillas.


My recipe for carnitas:(based on a Rick Bayless recipe)


I cube/cut up the boston butt, place it in a 5 - 6 qt heavy stock pot, and cover it by 1/2"+ with a 50/50 mix of beef and veggie broth(I have alot of homemade broth in my freezer as I am sure you do!), season with 3 minced cloves of garlic, pinch of salt, crushed black pepper, couple of bay leaves, and the juice of one lime, medium sized. I do about 2 - 2 1/2 #'s at a time. I bring it to a slow boil, and then let it cook, partially covered, over medium heat until all liquid is gone, and the pork begins to fry in it's own fat(the tip I picked up from Bayless) remove the cover, and brown the meat. This takes quite a long time. I just leave it on the stove and check it from time to time

Oh - I don't trim the fat from the butt, either. It makes its own lard.

This has consistently produced melt in your mouth carnitas, that have crunchy spots with that great pork flavor.


If, 2 1/2 years in, you don't control the only road linking your military airport to your headquarters, you don't control much of anything


Lewis Simons

 

elizaram's picture

(post #31574, reply #25 of 28)

Just for the record, Wolvie's carnitas are great. I have several pounds of them in the freezer atm. I'll have to try this recipe, as I "inherited" some of Pamilyn's tomatillos from Deanna. One can only eat so much salsa. :-)



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

KarenP's picture

(post #31574, reply #27 of 28)

  I did your carnitas for a party with the work folks last night, many whom are Mexican.  One of them looked at me and said, these are perfect, I can't believe it.  Thank you!

Wolvie's picture

(post #31574, reply #28 of 28)

cool - and - thanks - nice to know. :-)

 


I don't make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts. - Will Rogers