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Tea Steamed Fish

Syrah's picture

This was luscious, light but filling. It was also very doable on a weeknight because everything came together so quickly. It is going in my rotation.

Jasmine Tea Steamed Fish

200 g jasmine tea leaves
100 g ginger, thinly sliced
4 spring onions (scallions), cut into 5 cm lengths
4 x 200 g firm white fish fillets (snapper, barramundi or blue eye)
Ginger and Spring Onion Sauce
125 ml fish stock
60 ml light soy sauce
3 spring onions (scallions, sliced finely
1 tbs freshly grated ginger
2 tsp sugar
1 large red chilli (deseeded and thinly sliced)

1 Line a double steamer with baking paper and punch with holes. Arrange the tea, ginger, spring onions in the bottom basket and cover with lid. Steam for 10 minutes or until the tea is moist and fragrant.
2 Lay the fish fillets in a single layer in the top basket. Steam until just done.
For the sauce:
1 Combine the sauce ingredients plus 125 ml water in a saucepan, and stir over a low heat until the sugar dissolves.
2 Serve fish with steamed rice, asian greens and the sauce drizzled over.

Servings: 4

"The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off"
Gloria Steinem


Edited 3/20/2006 6:24 am by Syrah

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Wolvie's picture

(post #32327, reply #1 of 6)

copied this the CT recipes to try - sounds great for a late weeknite supper. Thanks for posting. :-)

 No mans error becomes his own Law; nor obliges him to persist in it


THOMAS HOBBES, Leviathan, part 2, p. 237 (1950).

 

whatscooking's picture

(post #32327, reply #2 of 6)

I've had jasmine green tea and love its aromatic quality.  Is that what you used or is there a jasmine black tea? 

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Syrah's picture

(post #32327, reply #3 of 6)

I used Jasmine Green leaf tea.

"The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off"
Gloria Steinem

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Glenys's picture

(post #32327, reply #4 of 6)

This is from one of my basics classes.

Tea Smoked Chicken Salad

Wok smoking can be used to flavour cooked or raw fish, scallops or prawns, as well as bocconcini mozzarella, onions, chicken and turkey.

Change the tea and the flavour varies but avoid any spice mixture with clove, which tends to mentholize in cooking.

Line the wok with foil to for easy clean-up.

The rub:

1 tbsp Szechwan or black peppercorns
1 tbsp. coarse salt
1 tsp. orange zest
1 whole chicken breast, skin on (bone -in is also excellent; adds flavour in poaching)

Toast the peppercorns and salt in a dry skillet. Crush in a mortar and pestle or with the bottom of a frying pan. Combine with the zest and rub the chicken breasts with the mixture. Refrigerate overnight for best flavour.

Poaching:

4 cups water
1/3 cup soy sauce
1 green onion, coarsely chopped
2 whole star anise
2- 3” strips of orange peel

Combine to create a poaching broth. Bring to boiling, add the chicken, making sure it’s submerged. Poach the chicken until done. Remove and cool to room temperature.

Smoking:

1/2 cup rice
1/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup lapsang souchong tea
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Line the wok with foil. Combine the “fuel” and sprinkle in the wok. Place a small metal rack in the wok. Rub the chicken with sesame oil and place the chicken on the rack and cover tightly. Heat until smoke comes out the sides. Turn off the element and wait several minutes for the wok to cool. Open the lid and remove the chicken. Slice for salad.
Tea Smoked Chicken Salad
for three

11/2 cups julienne vegetables- daikon, cucumber, carrots, peppers,green onion,
3 tbsp. rice wine vinegar
2 tbsp. lime juice
1 tbsp. sugar
salt and pepper
1 tsp. grated ginger
1 tbsp. oil
pea shoots or lettuce or watercress
6 oz. smoked chicken

Whisk together the dressing ingredients and stir to dissolve the sugar.

Combine the julienne vegetables and if possible, marinate for several hours for optitimum flavour. The dressing can also be doubled if serving immediately.

If desired the pea sprouts or cress can be seared briefly in oil. Arrange the vegetables on the greens and top with sliced chicken.

Syrah's picture

(post #32327, reply #5 of 6)

Looks great. In fact, I saw Ross Burden tea smoke duck breasts once and it always stuck in my mind. So when I saw this recipe, I had to try it.

How long does it take (about) for the tea to smoke? That bit kinda freaked me out.

"The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off"
Gloria Steinem

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

samchang's picture

(post #32327, reply #6 of 6)

I've left whole chickens to smoke for 30 minutes. The trick is to manage the fire for proper smoking: too high and you've got to cut it short, smoking only the outside and leaving a bitter taste; too low and not enough smoking occurs. It needs to be just right, and variables will include how many/how big the chickens in the wok, and the temperature and weather (we smoke it outside--it is harder to do as the temp drops) at the time of smoking. Ideally, the bird will come out bronzed, the skin slightly crisped as the subcutaneous fat partially renders. Because of the latter, this is a particularly good way to prepare duck. Smoked duck is one of the Sichuan region's greatest wonders. Alas, it is so hard to get a good duck in SoCal.

We use a combination of rice, tea, brown sugar, and aromatics, which at any one time may include orange peel, cinnamon, star anise, pine needles, and camphor wood chips (a must for ducks).

My advice is to stay away from pine needles!