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Supper Supper

eclecticcook's picture

Is anyone familiar with the Supper Supper concept?  I am thinking about applying for a job with them and am looking for some input.  Thx.

MadMom's picture

(post #31592, reply #1 of 20)

Are you thinking of Super Suppers?



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

eclecticcook's picture

(post #31592, reply #2 of 20)

Yes! So sorry... I am brand new, have never been on a chat page and am a bit nervous...

Glenys's picture

(post #31592, reply #3 of 20)

I'll bite and welcome to the board. What's the concept of Super Suppers?

MadMom's picture

(post #31592, reply #4 of 20)

Welcome to CT!  No need to be nervous.  Super Suppers was invented by a local lady, Judie Byrd, who runs a cooking school in Fort Worth, Texas.  She has franchised the idea all over.  I've met Judie and really like her, and I think any concept she has a part in would be successful.  Here's some info from her web site:


• Super Suppers is an entrée
assembly program designed
to save moms (and dads) time
and effort in serving
great meals to their families.

• We design recipes,
grocery shop, and
prepare all of the
ingredients.


• Over twenty years
of culinary experience in
each recipe and all are
tested in our kitchen.


• You assemble 12 entrées
in less than 2 hours by
rotating to 12 stations that
have been prepped with
ingredients and easy to
follow instructions.


• All 12 entrées are transported
home (bring a cooler, box or
laundry basket) and put
in the freezer until they are ready
to be thawed and cooked.

 
Super Supper Six!

Are you a small family or single, and thinking 12 generous entrees is just too much food? Lucky you!


Now you can attend Super Suppers and take home SIX full entrées. You can still divide them into halves (using two half pans) so each entrée will generously feed 3 eaters. And it will take you just under one hour!


If you decide to make the full 12 entrées, that’s okay also. Just sign up for both sessions on Super Supper Six night and stay the full 2 hours. It’s your choice.


Look on the schedule to locate Super Supper Six nights – and sign up now!




Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!


Edited 10/26/2005 12:55 pm by MadMom

Glenys's picture

(post #31592, reply #5 of 20)

Now let me in on the concept. What are we doing??

DeannaS's picture

(post #31592, reply #6 of 20)

The concept is that you go to a professional kitchen facility, where all your ingredients are pre-prepped for you, and then you "make" (read: assemble) dinners that you take home and freeze. It's done assembly-line fashion and you can leave with 12 dinners in 2 hours. And, you don't have to do any of the clean up either.

I think it's a decent business concept, and the food is probably better than fast food or some other take out. But, I wouldn't be doing it for my family - I don't think it's worth the money, and I like to have more control over what we eat.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

PeterDurand's picture

(post #31592, reply #7 of 20)

"and I like to have more control over what we eat."

Good point. Never heard of that business. It seems like there are some interesting ideas. It needs a few days of reflection.

Any one else have experience with it?

Cheers,

Peter

 

AJ12754's picture

(post #31592, reply #8 of 20)

A friend of mine does this and she has been really pleased with the dinners for her family....sorry I don't know if it is exactly the same franchise but the concept is the same.

Cave obdurationem cordis

DeannaS's picture

(post #31592, reply #9 of 20)

As a business concept, I think it's a winner. There's a ton of different versions. One just opened here called "Main Dish Kitchen." I think that in the right market (ie people with money but little time) it's a very viable business option. And, I'd even consider doing it once as a social event. (They'll do custom groups - like for bridal showers and birthday parties and such.) But, I'd see it as more of a social event than a way to provide food for the family, is all.

There was just an article in our paper about the one that is here. The food got decent reviews (except the egg rolls). But, for example, one of the meals was shredded beef on buns. How much effort does it take to do, for example, Gretchen's pulled pork? And, for the price of one pork butt, you get a ton of meat versus the 3-4 servings you get doing it this way. They say it still takes about 40 minutes to an hour to then bake or grill these dishes from frozen to get them on the table. Most times, if we're in a rush, I can have _something_ on the table in 30 minutes. So, I just don't see it as that big of a time-saver, either.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

Glenys's picture

(post #31592, reply #12 of 20)

Our chapter of Les Dames d'Escoffier funds a community kitchen project(s) similar to this. It's a great way for less than stellar cooks or those lacking in equipment to get together and mass produce. Allthough the natural inclination would be to attract single moms, we found we had a real mix of single moms, widowed elderly and single dads with children as well. Great social outlet. I realise the this a more of a semi-mass production concept but it can be a very rewarding community and social experience as well.

Another concept I love, but altogether different in purpose, is a space for small, small food purveyors to produce anything from stocks, HMR's, muffins or sandwiches. A friend in California is doing just this and rents out the all stainless licensed kitchen in a warehouse, each purveyor has walk-in fridge access and "cages" as lockers for supplies.
She's done really, really well with it and I was thinking of something similar here. It's interesting how odd the schedule can be and someone still wants to rent a time so it almost runs 24/7.

MadMom's picture

(post #31592, reply #13 of 20)

Such a great idea!  I've heard of so many people who like the idea of starting a small food preparation business, but are put off by the tremendous cost of getting a licensed, approved, kitchen.  This would allow them to try out their idea at a minimal cost before investing their life savings. 



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

DeannaS's picture

(post #31592, reply #19 of 20)

That's a great idea. We just had a "cooperative commercial kitchen" open here. You rent time by the hour. We have a lot of "carts" for lunches in the summer, and I could see this being very beneficial for them. Me, I'd kind of like to figure out how to sell some baked goods on the side. But, I have no clue how to go about it. The fact that I could now have access to a commercial kitchen makes me more inclined to try to figure it out, though.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

eclecticcook's picture

(post #31592, reply #20 of 20)

Yikes! What great input... Thx!.  I will keep you posted on my progress.  I  wish I could change the discussion to the correct spelling and I wish I had  joined this board a year ago!

Glenys's picture

(post #31592, reply #16 of 20)

Come to think of it, there's a woman here that was doing a book on cooking as a group. I did a class with her with my own recipes while she tried to pitch the concept of getting together, buying bulk and cooking as a party, everyone taking the goods home. She called it Month of Sundays. It went over like a lead balloon in class because of course, most people who go to classes can figure it out.

CulinaryArtist's picture

(post #31592, reply #18 of 20)

This is becoming more and more successful.  In the Personal Chef association that I belong to there are many chef's who have branched out and are doing this on a monthly basis. Just recently heard from one chef out west who is actually building his own building to house it as it has become so successful he's outgrown the commercial kitchen he was renting for his once a week events!!!


It provides another dimension to cooking in a hurry and is based on fresh ingredients vs. prepackaged.  Also for many it's a night out with friends, etc.  With good direction I believe it can be very profitable.


 


 


Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST

Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST

http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com

MadMom's picture

(post #31592, reply #10 of 20)

I've never been to one of these classes, although I have attended classes at Judie Byrd's cooking school (she was the one who organized the cruise with Jacques Pepin that I was dying to go to, remember?)  After all, I have no life, so prepping things for dinner is a pleasure, rather than a chore.  At the local school, you can choose from a long list of entrees, picking those you think your family might enjoy.  The ingredients are prepped for you, you assemble the entrees in freezable containers, and take them home.  When you want to cook, you simply heat and eat.  I think that if something like this had been available when I was a working mother, I would have jumped on it.  It's a chance to have something approaching "gourmet" food in a "fast food" timeframe.   



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!


Edited 10/26/2005 12:55 pm by MadMom

Aberwacky's picture

(post #31592, reply #11 of 20)

It's a chance to have something approaching "gourmet" food in a "fast food" timeframe.   


I'm all for it if it encourages people to eat "real" food.  Might even help them realize they could do it themselves at home, with a little prep.


Leigh


 


I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers)! I am a domestic goddess!  I deserve three ovens (and two dishwashers). . .

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
dlish's picture

(post #31592, reply #14 of 20)

Isn't her name Judy?

MadMom's picture

(post #31592, reply #17 of 20)

Actually, it's Judie...I just can't type!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

dlish's picture

(post #31592, reply #15 of 20)

I think you have a good amount of control over what you make. Like, if you don't like onions, you don't have to put them in your dish. Or if you have a certain food allergy, you don't have to include that particular item.

They have ####monthly "menu" of dinner choices and you can make whatever. If your family really likes chicken enchiladas, you can make several of those and less of others.

As for where the ingredients come from, i.e. organic, etc. The consumer doesn't really have control over that.

Disclosure: A close friend of mine owns the Scottsdale, AZ franchise.