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Summer Food

Tobin_The_Boy_Cook's picture

Well, I have not posted much though with summer school out, I have A LOT more free time. Though, with a little tighter budget, we will be having cereal for breakfast, and some sort of microwave meal for lunch...every....single....day.... so witch is why I have called upon help from, well, anyone who is willing to give it.


I need some Ideas on good foods, that you can make out of stuff that anyone would have in their kitchen. I have all of the basic spices, and a few, nice, ones. Just so I will not gain 15 pounds over the summer.


Thank you,


~Tobin

dlish's picture

(post #32693, reply #1 of 27)

The quesadillas from this month's FC would be good. You could also make different quiches or fritattas. Those dishes seem to be good for using up whatever is in the fridge. Happy experimenting!

pamilyn's picture

(post #32693, reply #3 of 27)

I had a potato quiche over the weekend. Yum. Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

pamilyn's picture

(post #32693, reply #2 of 27)

Last night I made tuna on pasta. I cooked an onion and some garlic, threw in some tuna, halved a bunch of cherry tomatoes and threw those in. Diced a bunch of parsley, threw that in. Just SLIGHTLY warmed everything up. Put on top of spaghetti, squeezed  lemon over the top and then "Horror of horrors" put regiano on the top. I know, I know, no cheese with seafood.....so shoot me. I like my Parm. Super Yum and cheap. Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

drussell's picture

(post #32693, reply #4 of 27)

Old standby comfort food-tuna melt. Cheese with seafood! LOL!

MadMom's picture

(post #32693, reply #5 of 27)

To combine two threads (this one, plus Sally's thread about salt) - I ordered a tuna melt at a restaurant the other day, because I hadn't had one in years, and it just sounded good.  The darn thing was so salty I couldn't eat it.  Plus nothing like any tuna melt I ever had...big mistake.



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drussell's picture

(post #32693, reply #9 of 27)

I hate it when that happens! You have a hankering for something you haven't had in a while and what you get is disappointing. When I need to taste something from the past I usually find that it's better done from home. With a new taste sensation at a restaurant, I have nothing to compare it to, so it must taste like it's supposed to unless of course the seasoning is all off like the tuna melt they served you.

Lee's picture

(post #32693, reply #6 of 27)

I also made a pantry dinner last night.  I tossed together Italian tuna, cannellini beans, capers, cherry tomatoes, sliced red onion and basil and dressed it with red wine vinaigrette (used the oil from the tuna in the dressing) and served it over arugula.  I made mango gelato on Sunday, and we had some of that wiith sliced strawberries for dessert. 

pamilyn's picture

(post #32693, reply #7 of 27)

Yum

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

Risottogirl's picture

(post #32693, reply #10 of 27)

Except for the red onion (I don't like raw onion), that was dinner tonight...but over romaine...

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Marcia's picture

(post #32693, reply #11 of 27)

I don't like raw onion, either, but soaked in ice water, they are delicious. Sometimes one even needs to change the water, but it depends on the onion, of course.

Jean's picture

(post #32693, reply #12 of 27)

I think it really tones down red onions especially.



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Marcia's picture

(post #32693, reply #14 of 27)

It's odd, but I keep reading and hearing that red onion is milder than other types, and I find just the opposite to be true. Agree that soaking is very good for the red onions.

RPCookin's picture

(post #32693, reply #24 of 27)

Personally, I can't imagine why anyone would want to tone down ANY onion, but that's just me.  A hamburger is only marginally edible without a solid slice of onion (preferably red) on it.  Love 'em in salads and sandwiches too...

Rick

Rick
Risottogirl's picture

(post #32693, reply #13 of 27)

Soaking or no soaking, if it crunches, it is too raw for me - goes for all types of onions. I can do the white part of scallions if the are sliced paper thin and of course the green part is fine.

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Marcia's picture

(post #32693, reply #15 of 27)

It was worth a try. :)

Risottogirl's picture

(post #32693, reply #16 of 27)

Raw onion and uni are really the only things I dislike enough to refuse.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay


Edited 6/22/2006 10:01 am ET by Risottogirl

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

CulinaryArtist's picture

(post #32693, reply #17 of 27)

How long do you soak it, and is it sliced, chopped or whole?


 


Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST


http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com

Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST

http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com

Marcia's picture

(post #32693, reply #18 of 27)

How long the onion soaks, depends on how strong the onion is and how much you want to tone it down. You'll have to experiment. I'd first try four hours in ice water in the fridge and go from there. Overnight is sometimes not too long. It depends on your particular taste buds, too.


I generally do slices, but this depends on what you want to do with the onion. I don't think soaking whole would have much effect - too much mass.

CulinaryArtist's picture

(post #32693, reply #19 of 27)

Thanx, I plan to play with it.


The only raw onion I like is a little bit of red now and then and of course scallions.  Otherwise prefer my onions caramelized with a dash of balsamic! YUM!


 


Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST


http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com

Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST

http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com

Marcia's picture

(post #32693, reply #20 of 27)

Many years ago, I could eat raw Vidalia onions, but suspect that the onions are not as mild as they once were, or perhaps the ones which are shipped to far-flung places, suffer in some way.

CulinaryArtist's picture

(post #32693, reply #21 of 27)

Somewhere, I remember reading that Vidalia onions are very delicate and don't keep very well.  Therefore someone found that they do something to the soil maybe to make them different than what they used to be so that they can travel and be stored, etc. Not a food scientist so I can't really say but I also remember that when visiting sister in GA the Vidalias were different, better.

Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST


http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com

Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST

http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com

Marcia's picture

(post #32693, reply #22 of 27)

My father used to send me a fifty pound case about thirty years ago, before they became "hot". I remember the UPS guy looking very puzzled and asking if they were organges. I shared with friends and neighbors, and the rest were hung in the garage in old (clean, to be sure) pantyhose, with knots tied between each onion.


They have a high moisture content which is what makes them more perishable. In very wet springs, they spoil even faster. I'm sure you're right about what they've done to market them widely.


Local is better in general, I find.

schnitzel's picture

(post #32693, reply #25 of 27)

I was watching a program that visited a farm growing Vidalia onions. The farmer said their naturally sandy loam soil of low sulphur content, mild climate and adequate moisture are responsible for the onion's sweetness. He really emphasized it's the lack of sulphur that allows the natural sugar taste to come through. Vidalia onions have a higher water content than other onions, so fresher would be better.


And now they store them like apples:
http://www.vidaliaonion.org/vidalia-onion-storage-and-shipping.aspx


Gretchen's picture

(post #32693, reply #26 of 27)

That is why the original Vidalia was "patented"--the soil in Vidalia, GA. 

Gretchen

 

Ooops I see you were talking about Vidalia specifically.  One way to store them is to put in pantyhose and knot them individually so they don't touch.


Edited 6/24/2006 10:28 am ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
Ricks503's picture

(post #32693, reply #23 of 27)

Have you tried sweet onions like Vidalia or Walla Walla?


Then Again I am an onion fan, also liking green onions and all types of radishes - raw preferably.  Supposedly Onions and garlic are natural antibiotics.


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Marcia's picture

(post #32693, reply #27 of 27)

Yes, I have. If you read a few previous posts in the thread, that has been discussed, but thanks.


I'm with you about radishes and have local ones in the fridge right now. Chives are my favorites for a mild onion flavor, and I can use masses of them.


Edited 6/24/2006 10:37 am ET by Marcia

HavaRocks's picture

(post #32693, reply #8 of 27)

My favourite thing for eating that I always have on hand is spaghetti with browned butter, garlic, and chile flakes.