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Success recipe: focaccia

SallyBR1's picture

... from a cookbook called "No Need to Knead"

probably the best focaccia I've ever made - the dough is so wet that you kind of "pour" it on the baking sheet.

It was also surprisingly fast to prepare - a quick, 40 minute rise (in fact mine I left for 1 hour), "pour" and bake

Instead of kneading, there is a 2 minute stirring - not as easy on the arms as I imagined it would be, but doable.

I am looking forward to trying other recipes from her book - I know other CTers have the book, so please let me know your favorites

MadMom's picture

(post #31415, reply #1 of 76)

Elizaram fixed this Sunday for sandwiches for lunch...absolutely delicious.  Guess I will have to buy another cookbook, LOL!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

SallyBR1's picture

(post #31415, reply #2 of 76)

Very cheap.... got it used for less than 5 bucks, if I remember correctly

:-)

(Always glad to help)

MadMom's picture

(post #31415, reply #3 of 76)

WHERE???



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

SallyBR1's picture

(post #31415, reply #4 of 76)

Sorry, MadMom - I did a search for it and now the cheapest is about $10

in amazon.com

I must have confused this with another used book I got - I could swear I paid less for it and with shipping it was around $9.

OH, well - it is still a pretty good price... :-)

Unschoolmom7's picture

(post #31415, reply #5 of 76)

I just got one from Amazon for $11.88 including shipping.


Do you all provide therapists for cookbook addictions or do I need to find my own? I had a problem before I found this list, but with all the enablers here it's almost out of control.  :o)


 


Karena

MadMom's picture

(post #31415, reply #6 of 76)

You don't need therapy.  You neeeeeed more cookbooks.  You want more cookbooks.  You have to have them.  (That's the mantra...repeat as necessary!)



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Unschoolmom7's picture

(post #31415, reply #7 of 76)

I don't have a problem with that mantra.


I just have a problem getting my loving husband to repeat it with me or at the very least build me more shelves. :o)


Karena


Edited 9/19/2005 4:21 pm ET by Unschoolmom7

MadMom's picture

(post #31415, reply #8 of 76)

Well, since I had to buy two more bookshelves at Target, I feel your pain!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

courgette's picture

(post #31415, reply #9 of 76)

I keep rearranging my shelves to accommodate the new cookbooks and by the time I'm done they're all full!  Currently have a huge pile on the floor in the sewing room.  Before I started hanging out here I had more cookbooks than anyone I know.  Now I have three times as many as anyone I know.  In fact I bought cookbooks this summer that I haven't even looked at, I've been so busy.


Have Meanie's pot roast in the oven for supper-and that didn't even come from a cookbook!  I love fall.  My favourite season by far.


Mo

courgette's picture

(post #31415, reply #10 of 76)

Recipe, please???


With a cherry on top...


Mo

SallyBR1's picture

(post #31415, reply #11 of 76)

Will type it tonight, post it tomorrow morning, ok?

MadMom's picture

(post #31415, reply #12 of 76)

I have it - Elizaram gave it to me...would you like for me to type it in?



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

SallyBR1's picture

(post #31415, reply #13 of 76)

It is pretty short... if you want to do it, go ahead... (I owe you one... :-)

I will check the site tomorrow morning and if you could not post for some reason, I'll do it

MadMom's picture

(post #31415, reply #14 of 76)

Focaccia
courtesy of Suzanne Dunaway, No Need to Knead


2 cups lukewarm water (85 - 95 F)
2 tsp active dry yeast
4 cups unbleached bread flour
2-3 tsp salt
2-3 tsp olive oil
2 Tbsp chopped fresh rosemary
1 tsp kosher or sea salt


In a large bowl, sprinkle yeast over the water.  Stir until dissolved.  Stir in 2 cups flour and the salt, until smooth.  With a strong wooden spoon, stir in the rest of the flour until incorporated.  Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let rise until doubled in volume, 30-40 min, or overnight in refrigerator.


Preheat oven to 500F.  Oil one or two nonstick baking sheets (I use oiled parchment on a half sheet pan) and pour the dough onto the sheet, carefully scraping it from the sides of the bowl, being careful not to deflate it.  Brush the dough with 2 tsp olive oil.  Dip fingers into cold water or olive oil and insert them straight down into the dough.  Make holes in the dough with your fingers as you gradually stretch it into a 1" thick oval.  Brush with 1 tsp more olive oil and sprinkle with rosemary and salt.


Place the pan into the oven and reduce oven temp to 450F.  Bake 15-20 minutes, until golden brown all over with a few darker brown spots.  Cool on a rack.


Note:  I haven't made this, only tasted it at Elizaram's, but it is fantastic!




Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!


Edited 9/19/2005 6:11 pm ET by MadMom

SallyBR1's picture

(post #31415, reply #15 of 76)

Thanks, MadMom - saved me a lot of typing... :-)

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #31415, reply #16 of 76)

Ok tell me what is so special about it.  Most often when people say they have the best focaccia/pizza dough recipe it is the same as the last one somebody posted which is the same as the one before.  Water, flour, salt, oil and yeast and once in a while a touch of sweet.


Some depart with semolina, potato maybe, but all of the standard ones are almost identical.


I don't get it.


Wolvie's picture

(post #31415, reply #17 of 76)

I'm thinking it's how it turns out - finding a recipe with proportions that lets the individual baker turn out  a bread in the manner that they like.


You know how you want yours to be, so you do what you need to get that. People who don't bake as often search for a recipe that enables them to achieve what they want without having the experience or techniques that pros have.


Just my take it on it.


If, 2 1/2 years in, you don't control the only road linking your military airport to your headquarters, you don't control much of anything


Lewis Simons

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #31415, reply #18 of 76)

You said it better than I--but that is what I think also. The dough that is being described is very wet so I would guess it gives a light airy but toothsome focaccia, which is what I would aspire to also.

Gretchen

Gretchen
MEANCHEF's picture

(post #31415, reply #21 of 76)

I don't think that works though.  Time of year, age of flour, humidity, temperature, brand of flour etc etc all will alter the recipe.  So I guess my response would be that one is fortunate if it works perfectly as written the first time, but the odds are against it repeating too often.

Wolvie's picture

(post #31415, reply #22 of 76)

hmmm - I see your point, but - did you see mine?


I don't think it would matter so much to you, or even to me, what the conditions were.


If, 2 1/2 years in, you don't control the only road linking your military airport to your headquarters, you don't control much of anything


Lewis Simons

 

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #31415, reply #24 of 76)

Yes I agree.  Although I am too lazy to go looking them all up, my original thought was that most of the recipes for focaccia discussed here over the years are essentially the same.  It is just that when one or the other gets a good report, it is just the alignment of the stars, not a different recipe.

knitpik's picture

(post #31415, reply #28 of 76)

Like making that perfect fluffy rice? ;-)

KyleW's picture

(post #31415, reply #29 of 76)

" Time of year, age of flour, humidity, temperature, brand of flour etc etc all will alter the recipe. "

There's the rub! All of these factors consipire to make each bread baking session a bit unique. The key is to try and remember what the dough looked and felt like when the bread worked. If you do remember, you'll know if you have to add a little more water on dry days, a little more flour on humid days to get the dough where it needs to be.

If you blindly measure identical quanties from one day to the next you will indeed get very different results.

 


There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness". D.Barry

 

At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.

Nightrider's picture

(post #31415, reply #30 of 76)

I got inspired by this thread yesterday and made the focaccia.  Yummy!  We had a delicious dinner of parmesan-crusted salmon, balsamic roasted veggies and focaccia.


My Italian DH just loved this version of focaccia.  It's going in to my recipe file.

Glenys's picture

(post #31415, reply #34 of 76)

In my basic bread class I do baguette, focaccia, boule etc. The focaccia is the example of dedicating to liquid rather than flour and this recipe takes the baker to that place, which is why those in search of that traditional texture, inexplicably arrive there. Potato, more oil, semolina- it's all just part of the flavour pack but it's the water that gives the texture.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #31415, reply #19 of 76)

Until now, my focaccias all turned out on the heavy side - the dough was more cakey than full of holes - the crust did not turn out crispy either. It was like eating a loaf of bad bread shaped as focaccia

I think it is more technique and how wet you allow your dough to be.

Plus, it LOOKED beautiful - I should have taken a picture this time

How you stretch it to make the holes probably contributes to the final product -

In fact, every bread recipe is very similar if you are talking baguettes for instance. But how you handle it, how long you allow the dough to rise, how you shape it (the stretching is so important, it is something that I only learned after reading Bread Baker's Apprentice)

It is quite possible that if I get one of my "old" recipes but treat the ingredients the way I did on Sunday, I'll get spectacular results, because after all, the ingredients don t change that much.

But, I can tell you one thing - the first time you make a great loaf of bread, or a great focaccia, or a great "whatever", it is such a great feeling! It is a bit like falling in love.... :-)

hillcountrycook's picture

(post #31415, reply #20 of 76)

But, I can tell you one thing - the first time you make a great loaf of bread, or a great focaccia, or a great "whatever", it is such a great feeling! It is a bit like falling in love.... :-)


I agree...even after making bread for over 20 years there is still a bit of amazement when I open the oven door and it is there all brown, crusty and beautiful...sort of like, "What a miracle!! It worked!"

debe5t's picture

(post #31415, reply #27 of 76)

Well said! You gave me goosebumps and I do not know much about baking...anything.Thanks,Deb

butterscotch's picture

(post #31415, reply #23 of 76)

Suzanne Dunaway, the author, used to own (and maybe still does own) a commercial baking business here in L.A. called Buona Forchetta that makes a variety of her "no knead" breads and sells them in upscale markets. I've had very good results with her recipes at home, but the Buona Forchetta breads don't do much for me. They're a little lighter than the usual but don't seem to have all that much flavor. The really exceptional thing about them is the price--about $4 for a filoncino (mini-batard)!

Heather's picture

(post #31415, reply #25 of 76)

This is very good focaccia--I made some tonight. After dinner I compared the recipe to the BBA Focaccia. The ingredients are almost identical as Mean says, but the methods are worlds apart. The wonderful thing about the NNtK recipe is that you can decide at 5:30 PM that you need bread for dinner and there it is, ready and delicious by 7. This fits my life style these days. The BBA focaccia has to be started the day before and takes several hours both days, kneading, two rises, shaping, etc. I'm sure if you had the loaves side by side for tasting the BBA would have an edge, but I got lots of compliments on tonight's quick version.
By the way, many thanks to whomever gave the great tip here recently about using those plastic food storage containers for rising bread. I no longer have to guess if the blob is doubled in size.