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Stuffing, stuffing, stuffing

TEChh's picture

Last night after a wonderful meal in Greektown, I told my friends that I would make the stuffing for their Pre-Thanksgiving Annual Dinner. What the #$%^ was I thinking? First of all, I don't even like stuffing. Second, I can't eat it without being sick. Lastly, I must have lost my mind for a few short minutes.

Could you all help me out by sharing your ABSOLUTE all time favorite stuffing/dressing recipes? I would appreciate it much more than you could possibly know.

TEC

chiquiNO's picture

(post #26943, reply #1 of 40)

TEC Here's my favorite Cornbread dressing that a lot of people here at CT have tried.....I still get e-mails from a great friend in north Louisiana who loves it.  The Oyster Dressing that is also a family favorite (I have to make them both) I just posted in the Oyster Dressing Thread.


 


Mardella's Country Chicken/Cornbread Dressing (Chiqui Style)

For the Chicken:

*1 whole chicken, well rinsed
*chicken giblets, well rinsed
*1 onion, cut-up
*2 green onions, left whole
*2 carrots, cut-up
*2 ribs celery. cut-up
*2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
*few sprigs parsley
*1 teasp. lemon-pepper
*2 tabsp. chicken soup base

Combine all ingredients in a stockpot and add enough water to cover by three inches. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for about 45 min. until chicken is tender. Strain and reserve broth. Remove skin and bones from the chicken and tear into small chunks. Slice or chop all giblets. Place chicken and giblets in a large bowl. Set aside.

For the Dressing:

*1-12" iron skillet of your favorite cornbread (without sugar, PLEASE!!)This is about two recipes of cornbread in quantity. Cooled and crumbled.
*2 cups fresh bread crumbs

*1 stick of unsalted butter
*3 onions, chopped
*3 bunches green onions (scallions), thinly sliced including green tops
*1 bell pepper, chopped
*3 ribs of celery, chopped
*4 hardcooked eggs, finely minced
*2 cans cream of chicken soup (Hold your britches...this is how Mardella makes it and I've left it out before and the dressing suffered for it!! Just do it!)
*Rubbed sage to taste (I use about a teasp.)
*salt to taste
*Lots of black pepper (I use lemon-pepper, of course, sugah)

*Reserved chicken stock as needed.

Saute all vegetables in melted butter until softened. Add these to the chicken along with the crumbled cornbread and fresh breadcrumbs. Add all remaining ingredients including enough chicken stock to create a very moist dressing. Don't hessitate to include a lot of broth, as it gets absorbed in the dressing as it bakes.

Divide the dressing between two casseroles. Wrap one very well in foil and save it for Christmas dinner..LOL. OR bake it all if you're feeding a large crowd. When ready to serve the other one, bake at 325* for 45 min. Add some turkey drippings on top if needed for extra moisture.

This is sooooo good......my family loves it..especially Uncle Bob (Aunt Tia's husband...he's from Tennessee and really misses his cornbread dressing from his mama.)

 



Chiqui from way down yonder in New Orleans

 

TEChh's picture

(post #26943, reply #2 of 40)

Well Ms. Chiqui,

That's just about perfect! I do miss cornbread dressing that was served when I lived in the South. The only change I'll need to make is with the cream of chicken soup. I'll have to find some without flour. Thank you very much.

chiquiNO's picture

(post #26943, reply #3 of 40)

You're so welcome, sugah....enjoy!

Chiqui from way down yonder in New Orleans

 

StevenHB's picture

(post #26943, reply #4 of 40)

I *hate* traditional stuffing always seems to me to be composed of little more than soggy bread and cooked celery.


I've made the following for years and always enjoyed it (feel free to disregard the directions for the turkey itself).  I like the contract is textures, though the almonds do soften up a bit while they cook.  The Rich Chicken Stock is a double-strength chicken stock.


                     *  Exported from  MasterCook  *


                   Roast Turkey with Wild Rice Stuffing


Recipe By     : Food & Wine, 11/92
Serving Size  : 1    Preparation Time :0:00
Categories    : Favorites                        Main Courses
                Poultry                          Thanksgiving
                Thanksgiving 96                  Forjcs


  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
   2 1/2  cups          wild rice
   3      cups          rich chicken stock
   3      cups          water
  12      ounces        waterchestnuts -- sliced
   1      bunch         watercress, leaves & tender stem -- chopped, coarsley
   4                    scallions, large, white and tender green -- chopped coarsley
     3/4  cup           almonds, blanched -- (4 oz)
     1/2  pound         prosciutto -- finely chopped
                        salt
                        pepper, freshly ground
  17      pounds        turkey -- 16-18lbs,gibs reserv
   1                    onion -- halved
   1                    celery ribs -- in 2" pieces-I omit
   3      tablespoons   sweet cream butter
   3      tablespoons   flour, all-purpose


Dilute the chicken stock with the water.


Rinse the wild rice in several changes of cold water and drain.  Put the rice in a medium saucepan, add 5 cups of diluted chicken stock and bring to a boil over moderately high heat.  Cover, reduce the heat to low and cook slowly, stirring occasionally, until the rice is tender and the stock absorbed.  The cooking time may vary from 35-60 minutes.  If the rice is not done and the stock has boiled away, add another cup of stock; if the rice is done but stock remains, uncover and boil over high heat until evaporated.  (The rice can be cooked up to 1 day ahead.  Let cool, then cover and refrigerate.)


In a large bowl, toss the cooked rice with the water chestnuts, water cress, scallions, almonds, and proscuitto.  Season with pepper and salt, if needed.  Let the stuffing cool thoroughly.


In a medium saucepan, cover the turky neck, heart and gizzard with 4 cups of water.  Add the onion, celery and a pinch of salt.  Bring to a boil over high heat.  Reduce the heat to low and simmer for 90 minutes, skimming occasionally.  Strain the broth and set aside; you should have about 3 cups.  Reserve the turkey gizzard and heart.


Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 325 degrees.  Spoon the stuffing into the check and neck cavities of the bird.  Fold the neck skin over the stuffing and secure with skewers.  Truss the bird with twine.  Season the turkey liberally with salt and pepper and rub the butter all over.  Wrap any leftover stuffing in a foil packet.


Place the turkey, breast side down, on a foil-lined rack, in a roasting pan and roast for 2 hours.  Turn the turkey breast-side up and roast for about 2 hours longer, basting often with the pan juices.  Ten minutes before the roasting time is up, add the turkey liver to the pan.  The bird is done when an instant-read thermometer inserted into the inner thigh registers 170 degrees.


Transfer the turkey to a warm platter, reserving the liver.  Let the bird rest for 30 minutes before carving.  Heat the extra stuffing in the oven for about 25 minutes.


Meanwhile, make the gravy.  Pour all the juices into a  large measuring cup.  Spoon about 3 tablespoons of fat from the juices into the pan and set it over two burners.  Stir the flour into the pan and cook over moderate heat for 1 minute, scraping up any browned bits.  Whisk in 1 cup of the reserved turkey broth until smooth.  Whisk in the remaining broth and simmer until thickened.  Degrease the remaining juices in the measuring cup and stir them into the gravy.


Chop the gizzard, heart and liver finely and stir into the gravy.  Season with salt and pepper.  Pour into a warmed gravy boat and serve alongside the carved turykey.



                   - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -



 



Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible

Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible
hambiscuit2's picture

(post #26943, reply #5 of 40)

< little more than soggy bread and cooked celery>


Exactly the reason I don't "stuff', but bake it separately instead. Stuffing/dressing is a vehicle to load the gravy on with my crowd.

Gretchentoo's picture

(post #26943, reply #10 of 40)

< little more than soggy bread and cooked celery>


Exactly the reason I don't "stuff', but bake it separately instead. Stuffing/dressing is a vehicle to load the gravy on with my crowd.


And exactly why I have to do both--kids and I LOVE the "soggy" bread in the turkey. And everyone also loves the "other" dish outside the turkey (except me).  The turkey never holds enough either--children (those that are home now) are always on the prowl for just a bit more for leftovers.

 

TracyK's picture

(post #26943, reply #11 of 40)

If anyone in my house ever stuffed the turkey, there would be a full-scale riot. All that potential gravy just soaking into the stuffing?!? Quel horreur!


"Noncooks think it's silly to invest two hours' work in two minutes' enjoyment; but if cooking is evanescent, so is the ballet."


Julia Child

StevenHB's picture

(post #26943, reply #12 of 40)

< little more than soggy bread and cooked celery>


Exactly the reason I don't "stuff', but bake it separately instead. Stuffing/dressing is a vehicle to load the gravy on with my crowd.


My issue here is that I don't like the taste of cooked celery (it's okay in mirepoix where it is cooked until it merges with all the other ingredients) and that I don't find the bread to be appealing whether cooked in the bird or out of the bird.  Hence, my endorsement of a stuffing based upon wild rice.  Unfortunately, as DW reminds me every year, I'm just about the only diner that we'll be having who feels this way.



Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible

Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible
RheaS's picture

(post #26943, reply #13 of 40)

You can come to Thanksgiving at my parents' or you can invite my family. Our yearly stuffing is very similar to your wild rice recipe. I'm the only one who likes a bread stuffing/dressing, but I still prefer the wild rice.

hambiscuit2's picture

(post #26943, reply #14 of 40)

I just might try your stuffing sometime, since I love wild rice, but will make the traditional cornbread dressing on the side with lots of sage, onions and celery. I would be booted right out of the family if I didn't do the cornbread one, and wouldn't want to experience Thanksgiving dinner without my dressing and giblet dressing. 

RuthWells's picture

(post #26943, reply #15 of 40)

I've read all the way through this thread and was surprised to see that *no-one* has yet advocated my grandmother's secret ingredient... which is to add a few handfulls of crushed corn flakes to a bread-based stuffing.  It adds body, texture & flavor.  Try it!


 


Ruth Wells

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

Biscuits's picture

(post #26943, reply #16 of 40)

Hambiscuit - I tried a wild rice/barley stuffing last year that was probably one of the best things I've ever made at T-Giving. As a matter of fact, it was so terrific that I'm foregoing my beloved cornbread stuffing this year (which I have had on the table every single year that I can remember) and serving that one instead. If you want the recipe, I'll post it. The barley really adds some "tooth" to the wild rice.

 

Ancora Imparo -

hambiscuit2's picture

(post #26943, reply #17 of 40)

Thanks, I'd like to see the recipe and it sounds good....but there's no way I wouldn't make the cornbread dressing. As I said, the family would boot me right out of the kitchen, and I would miss it too.

Gretchentoo's picture

(post #26943, reply #18 of 40)

Some things are just meant not to be messed with!!

CaroleG4's picture

(post #26943, reply #19 of 40)

I can't believe Thanksgiving is next week......We are doing Thanksgiving here for 15 people........Our stuffing this year(in the turkey and out of the turkey) is apple, chestnut, sage.......I have tried every stuffing known to man, and our family all want the good old traditional......I have tried  sneaking oysters in, sausage, etc.......So, rather than fight, I just go with what everyone wants........


 

Off to Tucson, got my groove on, in the shadow of the Rincon...
MEANCHEF's picture

(post #26943, reply #20 of 40)

I only make Julia's FARCE A LA TAPENADE.  It is the best.

StevenHB's picture

(post #26943, reply #22 of 40)

What's in it?  Is it a meat-based stuffing?


Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible

Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible
MEANCHEF's picture

(post #26943, reply #23 of 40)

                     


                           FARCE A LA TAPENADE



  1              pound  sweet Italian sausages -- casings removed
  1                cup  minced onion
  1                     turkey liver -- minced (optional)
  1              pound  fresh mushrooms -- trimmed, wiped, diced
  1                cup  black olives -- pitted and chopped
  3                     anchovy fillets -- mashed
  2        tablespoons  capers -- squeezed of brine
  2        tablespoons  orange zest
  2                     eggs -- lightly beaten
  1                     garlic clove -- minced
     1/2      teaspoon  dried thyme
  1                     bay leaf -- pulverized
  5               cups  croutons -- (5 to 6 cups)
                        Salt and pepper to taste


Break up sausage meat and sauté in a frying pan over low heat until lightly browned; drain, reserving fat. Place sausage meat in a large mixing bowl.


Return 2 tablespoons of sausage fat to the frying pan (if sausage meat didn't render enough fat, substitute olive oil); sauté onions until golden - about 8 minutes; add optional minced liver and sauté with onion an additional 2 minutes. Add onion mixture to sausage.


Sauté mushrooms in 2 additional tablespoons of sausage fat (or olive oil) until pieces begin to separate from each other; add to sausage mixture. Add olives, anchovies, capers, orange zest, eggs, garlic, and herbs to sausage meat. Fold in the croutons, add salt and pepper to taste.


Loosely stuff front and rear cavities of turkey immediately before roasting, or bake for 50 minutes in a 350 degree F. oven in a covered casserole.


Makes about 2-1/2 quarts, or enough to stuff a 16- to 20-pound turkey.


 


 


 

StevenHB's picture

(post #26943, reply #24 of 40)

Sounds interesting but 1) it will probably still end up in the "soggy bread" category for me and 2) no one but DW and I would eat it - and DW only if I omitted the anchovies.


Thanks.



Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible

Without coffee, chocolate, and beer, in that order, life as we know it would not be possible
MEANCHEF's picture

(post #26943, reply #26 of 40)

Never soggy.  I cook it outside the turkey and uncovered for half of the time so that it is crisp.

CaroleG4's picture

(post #26943, reply #27 of 40)

I do the same for the stuffing cooked outside the turkey......Some like it soggy, some like it crisp......Just have to make sure it is done thoroughly.......Haven't we had this discussion before?

Off to Tucson, got my groove on, in the shadow of the Rincon...
CaroleG4's picture

(post #26943, reply #25 of 40)

Mean, I would eat this in a minute.......My family would probably turn up their noses......When we prepare T. dinner for 15 people, we want to prepare what most of them will eat......One Thanksgiving we prepared two turkeys.....One with traditional stuffing and one with oyster, sausage, etc......Guess which one was eaten...


BTW, we have prepared our chestnuts and they are frozen awaiting the stuffing......

Off to Tucson, got my groove on, in the shadow of the Rincon...
KitchenWitch's picture

(post #26943, reply #28 of 40)

I thought you did the Thompsons Turkey?

~RuthAnn
I'm feeling much better, thanks.

~RuthAnn

Gretchentoo's picture

(post #26943, reply #29 of 40)

 
 

I thought you did the Thompsons Turkey?


No, about a year late he admitted he had never done it--just posted it.  I thought so also.


With regard to "stuffing" and "dressing", everyone ought to get with the program--"STUFFING" is INside the bird--"DRESSING" is outside the bird.

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #26943, reply #34 of 40)

>>No, about a year late he admitted he had never done it--just posted it.  I thought so also.<<


dang it! Fooled again!


~RuthAnn
I'm feeling much better, thanks.

~RuthAnn

Wolvie's picture

(post #26943, reply #35 of 40)

what? No whacks with the broom? I'm disappointed! ;-)

Woe to the cook whose sauce has no sting
- Chaucer

 

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #26943, reply #36 of 40)

No - he likes the whacks - the ol' perv.


kinda defeats the purpose.


~RuthAnn
I'm feeling much better, thanks.

~RuthAnn

Wolvie's picture

(post #26943, reply #37 of 40)

yeah, I know - but - he tried sooooo hard to earn one! ;-)

Woe to the cook whose sauce has no sting
- Chaucer

 

kai230's picture

(post #26943, reply #21 of 40)

Good solution, Pi :-) Another is to make up tiny batches of stuffing containing the stuff other people want. Heck, re oysters, just plop one on their serving LOL! Use the tiny loaf pans. You can use your basic dressing, then augment, or they can add things (herbs, etc.).


 


 

hambiscuit2's picture

(post #26943, reply #30 of 40)

Exactly!