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Steaming Vegi's

Tom_McCurnin's picture

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I need to steam enough vegi's for 12 this weekend. Yes, I have a manual steamer (the kind that fits in a saucepan), but need more space for the vegi's. The electric models look interesting, but don't appear to have enough space and are a little pricy. Any suggestions? Thanks in advance.

Jean_'s picture

(post #25882, reply #1 of 13)

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Do you have a spaghetti cooker? a tall skinny stock pot? In a pinch I've even used a large metal colander in a dutch oven or other large pot.

Sandra_'s picture

(post #25882, reply #2 of 13)

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IMHO specialized equipment like electric veggie steamers don't justify their cost unless you use them every day (or at least several times a week.) I just steamed a huge pile of vegies on a pizza pan with perforated bottom over top a pot of water that was boiling for spaghetti. Worked perfectly. A colander would work, too.

Glenys_'s picture

(post #25882, reply #3 of 13)

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A chemist once told me that the combination of heat and light i.e. glass lids on steaming units, actually kills the much desired nutrients. When it comes to large batches I still believe that blanching and refreshing, paying close attention to perfect "doneness" far more effective than most attempts at steaming. Brighter colour too.

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #25882, reply #4 of 13)

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And then there is a perforated hotel pan which is perfect for the job.

Jean_'s picture

(post #25882, reply #5 of 13)

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Then what did he say happened to the "dead" nutrients--always curious.:-)

Carolina's picture

(post #25882, reply #6 of 13)

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Just like Jean, etc. said, use a large stock pot with a steamer basket, like the one used to steam seafood. BTW, what's a glass lid got to do with anything? Some of my pots have glass lids and I like being able to watch the different stages of cooking of a dish without having to lift the lid and disturbing the cooking process. Rice is a perfect example.

mangia!'s picture

(post #25882, reply #7 of 13)

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The July issue of Fine Cooking (out already!) suggests opening, emptying, and cleaning cans. (I would think tuna cans would be a good size). Be sure to open them at both top and bottom (and peel off paper labels I would think). Set them in the bottom of a pot, add water, and set a cake rack on top. Set vegies on the rack, cover, and steam. Voila!

zally_'s picture

(post #25882, reply #8 of 13)

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NancyH: Now THERE is a good idea!!!

Jean_'s picture

(post #25882, reply #9 of 13)

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My cake racks are all square or rectangular. I like your idea, but who makes round ones? A square one would work for corn on the cob, but not for a bunch of cut up carrots, broccoli and cauliflower. Hmm, I'll just have to stick to my metal collander.

Glenys_'s picture

(post #25882, reply #10 of 13)

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The combination of light and heat at the same time diminished A, the B vitamins, and C at a greater rate than heat alone. I read the same material again in an article about nutrient sources in vegetables.
I have no glass lid pots, but it twigged when I saw the ad for B&D steamers.

Glenys_'s picture

(post #25882, reply #11 of 13)

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I don't understand the thing about not taking the lid off the rice. In the rice eating countries around the world they often cook rice beautifully without a lid, or at least a tight lid. It seems to be a North American thing perhaps.

Walt's picture

(post #25882, reply #12 of 13)

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There is a nice inexpensive pasta set with two
steamer baskets... one low and one high. I do
refresh the veg after steaming. It has a glass
lid but sells for about 19.95.

Walt's picture

(post #25882, reply #13 of 13)

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How about the wood ones. I believe you can stack those and I seem to remember that they were not too
pricy.