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mangia's picture

SOUPS... (post #27266)

I've been sick the last couple of weeks (just a bad cold and fatigue - nothing earth shattering), so on the days I stayed home, I made myself several soups.  (I kind of enjoyed the leisurely pace). Carrot Soup (which used to be in the tried and true folder, but isn't now); 2 variations of a broth based soup by Elizabeth David; Bocuse's leek and potato soup; and a soup I watched Martha Stewart make while I was lying around. I tried it, and thought it was worth posting. It has a creamy taste and feel, but there's no cream. it has a sort of complex flavor, but it's not hard to make - not a lot of ingredients. DH & I both thought it was very good.


I would pay attention to the size of the cauliflower. Mine was about 2/3 the size in the recipe, so I cut everything else back by the same amount. Wouldn't have been as rich otherwise. Rather than garnishing with the rest of the cauliflower, I just put in in the soup -- very good. (I still left it in roasted pieces, but I may have pureed slightly more than half of them for more body. The roasted pieces floating in the soup made a nice contrast). I'm not sure, but I think I used half red onion, and half yellow. Will have to try it again and see.  And I used a good olive oil instead of canola. I just love soups. Does anyone else have one they'd like to share?


Here it is: (It's Curried Roasted Cauliflower Soup)


http://www.marthastewart.com/page.jhtml?type=content&id=recipe3347&page=&dp=false&layout=Print&styleType=learn


Edited 1/19/2003 10:26:39 PM ET by mangia

Edited 1/19/2003 10:29:49 PM ET by mangia

Edited 1/19/2003 10:32:06 PM ET by mangia


Edited 1/20/2003 8:33:08 PM ET by mangia

MadMom's picture

(post #27266, reply #1 of 62)

Sounds delicious!  I love soups, but DH just tolerates them, so I usually sneak them in as a first course, although if I had my choice, when it's cold, I would eat them for my main meal all the time.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

wisekaren's picture

(post #27266, reply #6 of 62)

I love soups, but DH just tolerates them

***

Same here! The other night we had a lovely dinner at Lumiere here in Newton. For a starter, I got the cauliflower and leek soup, which was so good I wanted to cry. It had a tiny bit of lobster on top. Every spoonful was exactly cauliflower + leek, neither overpowering the other. Ahhhhh....

Here's a recipe I posted recently that is very creamy tasting:

No-Cream Asparagus Soup

Melt 2 T butter in large pot over medium heat. Add 2 med. onions, chopped, and 2 med. leeks (white and pale green parts only), chopped; saute until tender, about 15 min. Add 6 c chicken stock or canned low-salt broth and 2 # asparagus, ends trimmed, each cut into 4 pieces; simmer until asparagus are tender, about 15 min. Puree soup in blender in batches. Return to pot. Season with S&P. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover; chill.) Bring to simmer before serving, stirring occasionally.

Karen

MadMom's picture

(post #27266, reply #7 of 62)

Thanks for the recipe.  I tend to make most of my soups without cream, adding a small bit of potato for thickening if needed.  My favorite is carrot-ginger, basically made by dicing potato, adding thinly sliced carrot, chopped onion, grated fresh ginger, S&P, and sauteing in a bit of butter.  When the veggies have softened, add some low-sodium chicken stock (I normally just used canned, because it's so easy, but of course, if you have homemade around, go for it!) and cook until tender.  Puree in a blender and adjust seasonings.  You can use the same basic recipe, substituting other veggies (broccoli, peas, etc.) for the carrots, and substituting other spices or herbs for the ginger.  As with most of my recipes, quantities are just a guess...one medium potato, two or three carrots, half a small onion...you get the drill.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

Fledge's picture

(post #27266, reply #8 of 62)

I want that carrot soup when I come visit or yall come visit. k?

Ragin Cajun

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

MadMom's picture

(post #27266, reply #9 of 62)

The secret is the Central Market organic carrots!  (although I made it for years before I discovered those... )

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

Fledge's picture

(post #27266, reply #10 of 62)

haha- you just trying to get me there huh?


But I do believe you.


Ragin Cajun

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey

Ruth's picture

(post #27266, reply #11 of 62)

Soup with homemade bread and cheese, followed by fruit is a standard winter weekend lunch chez moi. This weekend it was pea soup with onion, turnip, carrots, ditalini and kielbasa -- and please don't ask for the soup recipe because there isn't one. A recipe that I do follow, and love, is for Turkish Buttermilk Barley Soup (from Diet for a Small Planet). It's very simple, delicious, and nourishing. I'll post it when I get a chance, if anyone is interested.

 

Ruth Dobsevage
Taunton New Media

MadMom's picture

(post #27266, reply #12 of 62)

Sounds interesting, Ruth...post away!  I made an interesting soup a couple of weeks ago...was really using a recipe for cockaleeky soup, but as usual, didn't have half the ingredients (and frankly, couldn't bring myself to throw prunes in it!) but what I ended up with was essentially a chicken-veggie soup with barley.  The interesting taste came from a "bouquet" of cloves, allspice, etc. that was added.  It wasn't overpowering, but really gave a boost to the flavor.  I'm becoming a big fan of barley soups, so look forward to yours.

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

Ruth's picture

(post #27266, reply #13 of 62)

Yes, barley is a terrific addition to a winter soup. Last weekend we had Scotch Broth (which is far from being brothlike). In fact, the ditalini made the soup team only because I didn't have any more barley in the house.


 

Ruth Dobsevage
Taunton New Media

MarieLouise's picture

(post #27266, reply #17 of 62)

I love soup, too. I try to make it once a week in the winter. Winter cooking is my favorite. Between our Indian summer and early spring, though, it seems I have more soup recipes than weeks in the winter. Of course, I get another crack at winter cooking during our foggy July & August, LOL.

Tonight I'm making Marcella Hazen's Minnestrone, using fresh cranberry beans I froze shelled but uncooked last fall.

kai230's picture

(post #27266, reply #14 of 62)

These all sound (or are) wonderful!


Don't forget miso--I like it w/green onions but have had some w/tofu I liked a lot.


Plus egg drop, being discussed in another thread.


I also like chick broth w/lemon juice and hot peppers/sauce. Use leftover as rice, grain, or gratin cooking liquid.


When just making it for myself or for sitdown dinners, I make black-eyed pea soup--lots of broth for cornbread.


Dumplings make soups richer IMO, but I like them best w/an overload of fat in creamy chicken soup.


Leftover salad w/Italian or OV dressing makes a fab quick soup--saute onions and garlic in btr and oo, add water, extra dressing or use stock, toss in salad. Optionally, after heating through, place in ovenproof crocks and add a crostini and some cheese and broil for a variation on onion soup.


And for warmer weather, gazpacho. Heat it during the winter, and use bigger chunks, or puree.


My method is to use a broth of choice, a grain, a veggie. Turkey broth, rice, barley, or wild rice, and celery or tomatoes is one of my childhood standbys.


There used to be a Chinese herb shop that had the best little packet of dried fungi and whatnot for chick broth. So wonderful. Somewhere in my boxes of paper is a business card that might tell me where they moved. Anyone have any ideas of what all might be in the mix? Some of it was edible, some just added flavor.

Astrid's picture

(post #27266, reply #15 of 62)

My standard soups for winter are lentil, sometimes curried, sometimes with keilbasa and kale, tuna-cheese, and green pea. I'm adding Jean's barley soup too.


New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
Biscuits's picture

(post #27266, reply #2 of 62)

Mmmm, it does sound good.  And I just happen to have a head of cauliflower in the fridge I was planning on doing something with.  This will be perfect.  It's soooooo cold here (high of 18 today, with expected highs of 14 the rest of the week!) that I'm planning on soup and other warming things all week - brrrrrrrr!


(And no, I do not want to hear about your weather, MadMom!  It's bad enough my mother called this morning complain about how cold she is with 58 degree weather!  (Grrrrrrrrrrrrrr......)



                                                                 


 


wtf    Biscuit


Edited 1/20/2003 12:37:29 AM ET by Biscuit

Ancora Imparo -

Jean's picture

(post #27266, reply #3 of 62)

There is a simple but very good one in T&T..


http://forums.taunton.com/tp-cookstalk/messages?msg=1419.1


 


The longer I live, the less future there is to worry about.  Ashleigh Brilliant   Image

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
schnitzel's picture

(post #27266, reply #4 of 62)

I've been sick the last couple of weeks (just a bad cold and fatigue...


Same here, Mangia, and hot soup feels so good on the throat.

There are two carrot soup recipes posted in T&T: 1379.1 
Dug around in the archives and found two more: 9582.2 and 6772.2


CM posted this wild rice and artichoke soup 14174.1  I sort of halved the recipe but used 4 cups of stock, 1/2 lb. boneless chicken thighs - cut up, 1 pkg. frozen artichoke hearts, and no half & half. DH and I thought it was fabulous.


Other favorites are:
Old-fashioned split pea soup with ham
Beef, vegetable and barley soup
Jasper White's chowders
French onion soup made with veal stock



And I just happen to have a head of cauliflower in the fridge...

Hmmm, me too.


~Amy
mangia's picture

(post #27266, reply #19 of 62)

Thanks for finding those, schnitzel. i didn't realize that some of the tried and true recipes had fallen into the archives. Much obliged! Hope you feel better soon, dear.

schnitzel's picture

(post #27266, reply #24 of 62)

 i didn't realize that some of the tried and true recipes had fallen into the archives.


Mangia, when you click on the T&T folder it displays the first 50 messages in that folder. To view more messages, scroll down to the bottom of that frame and click on the "next 50" and more messages will show up, repeat this to view all messages in that folder.


Wasn't sure if you knew this.


Hope you're feeling better too. ;)


~Amy
Wolvie's picture

(post #27266, reply #5 of 62)

I always like a minestrone, which in my house can often look nothing like the recipes in the book, it sorta depends on what I have handy.


some other faves of mine is hot and sour soup, pumpkin soup(several variations on this one), garlic soup, potato/cheese, carrot, Glenys' Madrai tomato.... LOL - the list is endless - I really love soup!


Woe to the cook whose sauce has no sting
- Chaucer

 

mangia's picture

(post #27266, reply #18 of 62)

Wolvie, I've been looking for my fav pumpkin (or winter squash) soup. Do you have your winner from the different ones you've tried? If so, I'd love to try it.


I'd also love your hot and sour soup recipe if you have time. Thanks!


Edited 1/20/2003 9:05:02 PM ET by mangia

mangia's picture

(post #27266, reply #20 of 62)

Jean, I'm starting to think of you as "The Soup Queen"! You sure post a lot of good sounding soups. I just got home from work, and I'm going to go in and try your tomato soup from the light lunch thread.


Thanks everyone for posting these recipes/ideas. All are printed up, in a folder, and soon to be tried. Another good soup is from an old Cooks Talk mag. It uses cannellini beans, ditalini, chick broth, pepper flakes , parmesan, onions etc , and the secret ingrd is mashed anchovies which give it a great flavor, and my anchovy- hating mom loved the soup and didn't detect the anchovies,. It's become a mid-week stand-by. Easy to make, hearty, and good.

Jean's picture

(post #27266, reply #21 of 62)

Well, when it's 10° out there and the wind is howling, there is nothing better than a hot bowl of soup for lunch. Well, almost nothing.

 


The longer I live, the less future there is to worry about.  Ashleigh Brilliant   Image

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Ruth's picture

(post #27266, reply #22 of 62)

Turkish Buttermilk-Barley Soup (from Diet for a Small Planet, p. 241):

Sauté in heavy pot until golden:
oil as needed
2 large onions, chopped

Add and stir until lightly toasted:
1 cup barley

When onion is well browned, add:
5 cups seasoned stock

Have ready:
2 cups buttermilk or yogurt
1 tsp  dill
butter

Cook until the barley is well done -- about 45 minutes to 1 hour (or 25 minutes with a pressure cooker). Remove from heat, let cool a bit, and add the buttermilk slowly and more stock if too thick. Sprinkle in dill to taste and butter.

 

Ruth Dobsevage
Taunton New Media

Jean's picture

(post #27266, reply #23 of 62)

Recipe

From Country Living...I just ran across this one tonight.  Are you ready for another carrot soup?  We're all going to turn yellow, I'm afraid. (pun intended-yellow-afraid-get it? oh nevermind)


Horseradish and ginger - zowie!!


Creamy Carrot Parsnip Soup


Let this subtly sweet and colorful soup lift your spirits during the waning days of winter.

Serving: Yields: 8 servings




2 pounds (about 8 cups) carrots, scraped and coarsely chopped
2 pounds (about 8 cups) parsnips, scraped and coarsely chopped
3 cups water
3 cups low-sodium chicken broth
2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons butter
1 medium onion (about 1 cup), finely chopped
4 garlic cloves, crushed
2 cups buttermilk
1 teaspoon fresh grated horseradish
1 teaspoon fresh grated gingerroot
1 tablespoon crème fraîche or sour cream (optional)
1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill (optional)




1. Cook the vegetables: In a large stockpot over medium-high heat, combine carrots, parsnips, water, broth, sugar, and salt. Boil gently until vegetables are tender -- about 15 minutes. In a 10-inch skillet over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the onion and sauté until translucent -- about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and continue to cook 2 to 3 more minutes.

2. Make the soup: Using a slotted spoon, remove the carrots and parsnips from the stockpot. In a blender or food processor, puree the vegetables in batches. Add the onion and garlic and puree until smooth. Return the mixture to the stockpot, add the buttermilk, and heat until warm but not boiling.

3. To serve: Stir in grated horseradish and ginger and garnish with creme fraiche or sour cream and a sprinkling of dill, if desired.



Based on individual serving.

Calories: 226
Total Fat: 6.9 g
Cholesterol: 15.7 mg
Sodium: 758 mg

Fiber: 8.80 g
Protein: 5.3 g


 


The longer I live, the less future there is to worry about.  Ashleigh Brilliant   Image

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
favorablyimpressed's picture

(post #27266, reply #35 of 62)

Mangia, the soup from Cooks Illustrated sounds wonderful.  Can you share the recipe or give me the name of the soup?  I'd be so greatful.


 

mangia's picture

(post #27266, reply #38 of 62)

Hi favorably! I searched the Fine Cooking website, and didn't see it there. I don't know if they post all of their recipes or just some of them. Does anyone know if they have old ones somewhere? Right now I just have an old "xerox" copy of it in a binder. I'll look for the original magazine (it's June/July 1996), and see if I can scan it in for you. One thing I do differently, is pre-cook the pasta a bit first, then add it later to finish cooking in the broth. Otherwise I find it absorbs too much of the broth. Ok, hopefully I'll be back soon w/ a successfully scanned recipe.


Edit: The recipe is not on the Fine Cooking website. (Li, how does FC decide which recipes to post, and how long does it leave them on there?) The title is "Spicy Pasta e Fagioli". My attempts to scan failed (omni pro said it was too difficult!), so I will type it in for you sometime this week-end when I have a moment. Promise!


Edited 1/25/2003 11:08:24 AM ET by mangia


Edited 1/25/2003 8:39:30 PM ET by mangia

Wolvie's picture

(post #27266, reply #30 of 62)

Hey keed - I will post that pumpkin recipe in the morning. As for the hot and sour, I am still trying to get it just right, but man - I love that soup!

Woe to the cook whose sauce has no sting
- Chaucer

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #27266, reply #25 of 62)

 

I always like a minestrone, which in my house can often look nothing like the recipes in the book, it sorta depends on what I have handy.


I guess that would characterize mine. I use the 15 bean soup mix to make my "minestrone"--onions, celery, tomatoes, ham bone if I have one.  Add pasta at the end and lots of parm.


Gretchen
Gretchen
Ruth's picture

(post #27266, reply #26 of 62)

We ARE all going turn yellow, but there are worse things than beta-carotene. I'm gradually reducing my pumpkin harvest, but there are still plenty left. Have made soup several times -- mostly these concoctions turn out to be a potage with various veggies added. Mostly I use potato as a thickener, sometimes yogurt.

 

Ruth Dobsevage
Taunton New Media

madnoodle's picture

(post #27266, reply #16 of 62)

Oddly enough, I also have a head of cauliflower languishing in the fridge.  I've printed out the recipe and will try it, as soon as I'm feeling better--DD and I are sharing a nasty stomach bug.


This probably belongs in the FC Feedback folder, but I just wanted to mention that I tried the noodle-shrimp-coconut milk soup in the latest issue, and it is wonderful.  No shrimp, so I used scallops instead.  Otherwise pretty much stuck to the recipe, with the additon of some thinly sliced red pepper and green onion to the bean sprout "salad".  It really is very easy to make--highly recommended.


Canada:  where different coloured money makes sense.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Fledge's picture

(post #27266, reply #27 of 62)

a nasty stomach bug.


There is another thing we are sharing.  ugh....talk about kill an appetite.


Ragin Cajun

You don't scare me

I have an African Grey