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Sharp Cheddar Cheese Soup Recipe

Tom_W.'s picture

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Would anyone happen to have a tangy sharp cheddar cheese soup recipe that they might share that doesn't depend on one of the jarred processed cheese products like Cheez Whiz?

Peter_Goulding's picture

(post #25565, reply #1 of 24)

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There's no lack of recipes for cheese soup - I came up with 5 in a few minutes. There's one called Vermont Cheddar-Cheese Soup from Time Life that looks quite good. I could easily fax it to you.

IS there some particular aspect for the soup other than cheddar that you're looking for?

Peter

Sandra_'s picture

(post #25565, reply #2 of 24)

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A cook I worked with years ago used to make a wonderful cheese soup using good beer in place of stock. He also added nutmeg, and lots of pepper.

Tom_W.'s picture

(post #25565, reply #3 of 24)

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Thanks for the reply. I too have found a number of Cheese Soup recipes on the net. I suppose as much as anything I'm looking for a recipe that will preserve the sharp tangy flavor of the cheese with a little body. A restaurant in our area which is no longer in business used to serve what they called Cheddar Cheese Soup that my family particularly liked. I have no idea if a secondary cheese was added or anything else. Several of the recipes that we have tried seemed to loose the cheese flavor and seemed "flat" almost like nothing more than a cheese colored white sauce. :-) Just thought I'd check with the experts and see if a cheese lover out there had already weeded out the recipes that were duds.......a scratch recipe not dependent on brand x or brand y. Family cooks have a captive audience however talk about critics....whew....

kai_'s picture

(post #25565, reply #4 of 24)

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Hi Tom, all,

My best cheese soups were when I bought extra sharp cheddar, non-colored, from Canada (I was in NY at the time). It's puzzling me whether the cheeses are no longer as sharp, or I, a chili-head, have developed a different level of taste awareness that somehow deems the cheese not as worthy as it once was :(

The main thing I have learned when cooking with cheese is that it is really crucial *when* you add it; when possible, I think the last minute is the best (heat does rearrange the molecules, I believe, and can make it "tough").

best, and do post the award-winning recipe! I love soup! I love cheese! (which reminds me, any recipe for soup using Gorgonzola?)

kai

mangia!'s picture

(post #25565, reply #5 of 24)

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All right you Gorgonzola Lover,you. Go to copycat.com, home page & type in gorgonzola & click search. I couldn't find a soup recipe, but there were several other good sounding gorgonzola recipes. I know you once went into ecstasy over some bleu cheese, so I'll bet you'd like these! Have fun, kai!

Cleaver's picture

(post #25565, reply #6 of 24)

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A pinch of dry mustard. It'll do it everytime. Perfect for cheese sauce too.

Cherry_Vanilla's picture

(post #25565, reply #7 of 24)

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You might call your local newspapers to see if they have the recipe from that restaurant, especially if their cooking section has a "Restaurant Replicas" column. They just might have it if the soup was very popular and somebody previously asked for the recipe. You never know.

Sandra_'s picture

(post #25565, reply #8 of 24)

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Yes! Sorry, I had forgotten about the dry mustard. And worscester (sp?) sauce.

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #25565, reply #9 of 24)

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Here is a recipe for cheddar-stilton soup:

*3 tbl unsalted butter
*2 onions minced
*3 cloves garlic minced
*1/2 lb stilton
*1/2 lb cheddar
*1/4 cup flour
*1 bay leaf
*1/2 cup white wine
*3 1/2 cups chicken stock
1/2 to 1 cup heavy cream

This is an instant heart attack, but it's good.

Sweat onion and garlic in butter. Add cheese, stir until melted and blended. Add bay leaf, wine and stock. Increase heat and whisk until boiling. Remove from heat and stir in cream.

kai_'s picture

(post #25565, reply #10 of 24)

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Kewl Nancy!

What a great site! I also compared it (oops, you have to go to "Locate" I think before you can type in the search words) to www.dogpile.com which gave a few more sites when I used the same search criteria. Don't know how comparable they are, however, as I don't have the time to check them out just now.

Thanks for the great tip! And, yes, you remember correctly--I love bleu, and even limburger (sp?)

You are a dear!

kai
kaiforChi@aol.com

kai_'s picture

(post #25565, reply #11 of 24)

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Mean, whoever decided that ["Mean"] name was wrong! This is food from the Gods and Goddesses! (I actually would rather *go* from a heart attack than an accident on a freeway.)

Thank you for this delight!

kai

kai_'s picture

(post #25565, reply #12 of 24)

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Good idea!

You just reminded me of the best French onion soup this side of my house! I will ask if the newspaper still has (or ever had) the recipe! Good call!

thanks Cherry,
kai

Rebecca's picture

(post #25565, reply #13 of 24)

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Hi Kai...even though this recipe has Stilton instead of Gorgonzola I hope you'll like it. This is not a thick soup but it is very rich. Don't serve it with a rich lamb dish like I did! We really liked this. Please let me know if you try it. The recipe states that Cheddar & beer can be substituted for the Stilton & port - and maybe dried mustard should be added as Cleaver recommends.

Cream of Onions Soup with Stilton (Onions, Onions, Onions (Griffith)


1/4 C butter
4 C finely diced white onions
1 1/2 C chopped leeks, white part only
3/4 C finely diced shallots
2 plump carrots, finely chopped
3 T minced flat-leaf parsley
1 T minced tarragon (I use fresh Mexican Mint Marigold or 1 t dried tarragon)
3 T unbleached flour
5 C milk
3/4 C port wine (recommended Dow's AJS Vintage Character Port)
1/2 lb Stilton cheese, grated (2 C)
some kosher salt & freshly ground pepper (recipe calls for white, I use black)
3 strips cooked bacon (optional)
3 T minced chives


1. In a large, heavy-bottomed nonaluminum saucepan melt butter over low heat.
2. Add all the vegetables & herbs.
3. Cover w/tight-fitting lid & cook over very low heat, stirring occasionally, until onions & carrots are tender, about 20 minutes.
4. Puree vegetables in a blender or food processor.
5. Return to saucepan. Can be made ahead at this point (I leave it at room temp. all day).
6. Sprinkle puree w/flour & stir over low heat for about 3 minutes to cook the flour.
7. Slowly add milk, stirring constantly to avoid lumps.
8. Cook over medium heat until hot & thickened.
9. Add port & stir until heated through.
10. Add cheese & stir over medium-low until melted & evenly blended.
11. Season w/salt & pepper.
12. Sprinkle individual portions w/bacon & chives.

Sandy_G.'s picture

(post #25565, reply #14 of 24)

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I was wanting to try your recipe for Cheddar-Stilton Soup... printed it out, etc. and then discovered that Stilton is unavailable at my local grocery...(I live in the sticks.. what can I say?) Anyway, I was wondering if you could suggest a substitute for the Stilton.... Thanks, Sandy G.

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #25565, reply #15 of 24)

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I suppose you could try it with gorgonzola, or any bleu cheese. Probably won't taste quite the same however. Why not wait til you make a trip to the "city".

kai_'s picture

(post #25565, reply #16 of 24)

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Rebecca, that sounds so wonderful! It is very close, with the beer and cheddar substitutions, to a soup I cooked years ago (I used curly parsley, and I think I used garlic but not shallots, and I don't recall the tarragon), PLUS a bunch of cooked potatoes, which was TDF (to die for).

Thanks! I have never cooked with Port, and look forward to trying it!

kai

Sandy_G.'s picture

(post #25565, reply #17 of 24)

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Because I wanted to make it right now! :) I'll get some stilton next time I run into Fort
Worth. It just requires I remember to do so and trying to remember anything while in
the company of two children, 4 being the eldest, is sometimes difficult.

Sandy_G.'s picture

(post #25565, reply #18 of 24)

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Pardon my ignorance, but why do you have to use a non-aluminum pan for this soup? I thought aluminum was one of those metals that didn't re-act with foods...

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #25565, reply #19 of 24)

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Aluminum DOES react with foods, particularly acidic ones. After you scrub an aluminum pot, take a look at your scrubber. That stuff gets into your food. It will turn a cream sauce gray.
Stainless is non-reactive.

Sandy_G.'s picture

(post #25565, reply #20 of 24)

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Ah! I was thinking that my pans were all aluminum, I forgot they are only aluminum on the inside, they are bonded with stainless on the cooking surface.

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #25565, reply #21 of 24)

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You mean the outside,I hope.

Sandy_G.'s picture

(post #25565, reply #22 of 24)

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All Clad Master-Chef:

I quote from All Clad's brochure: The cooking surface is hand-polished 18/10 stainless steel that will not react with food. The inner core is pure aluminum (what I meant by the inside is aluminum) not just at the bottom, but all the way up the sides. All three layers are bonded together for optimum heat conducitivity.

I stand by what I wrote: The INSIDE is aluminum and the COOKING SURFACE is stainless.

mangia!'s picture

(post #25565, reply #23 of 24)

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Mean, your description of your soup reminds me of a time we went to a B & B in the wine country. Our lovely, motherly hostess, with a soft round face, placed our breakfast in front of us, smiled so sweetly, and said, "Here you go. We call this 'Death by Cheese'"

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #25565, reply #24 of 24)

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Try souprecipe.com - do a search on cheddar or any kind of cheese you like.