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Seeking Fabulous Mushroom Risotto Recipe

RuthWells's picture

Hi y'all,


It is once again the time of year when I have to come up with ideas to feed my extended in-laws -- which include a celiac, a vegetarian, a diabetic, tomato allergies, and heart disease.  I'm thinking a wild mushroom risotto.  Does anyone have a fabulous mushroom risotto recipe to share?

TIA!


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

MadMom's picture

(post #31455, reply #1 of 33)

I know this is heresy to the true risotto lovers here, but I'm a big fan of Peter's risotto, made in the pressure cooker.  I often add mushrooms (the original recipe calls for beets, but DH does not care for them) and it comes out perfect every time.



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Jean's picture

(post #31455, reply #2 of 33)

Here's one that's on my list to try.


1 ounce (30 g) dried wild mushrooms, or 8 oz. (250 g)fresh mushrooms (any variety or mixture of varieties)
2 cups (500 ml) chicken stock (4 cups (1 L) if using fresh mushrooms)
2 Tbs (30 ml) finely chopped shallots or onion
4 Tbs (60 ml) butter
3 Tbs (45 ml) olive oil
2 cups (500 ml) raw Italian Arborio rice*
1/2 cup (125 ml) dry white wine (optional)
1/4 cup (60 ml) grated Parmesan cheese
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste


If using dried mushrooms (recommended) soak in 2 cups (500 ml) warmwater for at least 30 minutes, until the mushrooms are soft. Removefrom the water and chop coarsely. Strain the water through a paper towel and combine it with the 2 cups (500 ml) of chicken stock in a saucepan. Bring this mixture to a simmer over medium heat. If using fresh mushrooms, chop coarsely and set aside, and bring 4 cups (1 L) of chicken stock to a simmer.


In a heavy 2 qt. (2 L) pot over medium heat saute the shallots in 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of butter and 3 tablespoons (45 ml) olive oil until translucent but not brown. Add the rice, stir to thoroughly coat with the oil and butter, and saute for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the wine or 1/2 cup (125 ml) of the simmering stock, stirring frequently.


When the liquid is almost completely absorbed add another 1/2 cup (125 ml) stock, and repeat this process for 15 minutes, stirring frequently. Add the mushrooms and continue adding stock as it becomes absorbed for another 5 to 10 minutes, until the rice is done. You may have some stock left over; do not feel compelled to use it all, as this will make the risotto too runny. Test the rice for doneness by tasting it; it should be "al dente" (soft but still firm to the tooth) and the risotto should be creamy at this stage. When the rice is cooked remove the pot from the heat and stir in the Parmesan cheese and the remaining 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of butter. Taste and adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper if necessary. Serves 4 to 6.


Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


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RuthWells's picture

(post #31455, reply #3 of 33)

This looks like a great base recipe, Jean, thanks!


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

SallyBR1's picture

(post #31455, reply #4 of 33)

Jean....

how big is your "to try" list?

(Sally ducks quickly)....

Jean's picture

(post #31455, reply #5 of 33)

You know I'll not live long enough to try all the recipes I'd like to try or read all the books that I'd like to read.


Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
SallyBR1's picture

(post #31455, reply #6 of 33)

Same here, Jean... same here.... (le sigh)

RuthWells's picture

(post #31455, reply #33 of 33)

Reporting on the mushroom risotto -- we sorta used Jean's recipe, but Hubby being the free spirit that he is, a few liberties were taken.  A total of 1.5 ounces of mixed dried 'shrooms plus about 12 ounces of fresh baby bella 'shrooms.  So, lots more than the recipe called for.  For stock, we used a store-bought gluten-free veggie stock which was pretty robust.  To this we added the strained liquid from reconstituting the dried 'shrooms.


Well my goodness my gracious -- Hubby had to forcibly remove the tasting spoon from my hand.  Absolutely scrumptious.  Jean, move that recipe up to the top of your "to try" list!


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

Risottogirl's picture

(post #31455, reply #7 of 33)

I don't really use "recipes" for risotto, but I have a couple of hints for really "mushroomy" risotto (if that is what you are going for):


use a mushroom stock instead of chicken stock (I make a mushroom fennel stock regularly)


use a combo of fresh and dried mushrooms for the best flavor and texture (definitely used the soaking liquid from the dried - I soak in wine) I normally used 2-3 varieties of fresh and 2 dried.


be sure that the mushrooms are well seasoned before adding them. I sautee mine in olive oil and butter, seasoning assertively with sea salt, pepper and garlic and whatever fresh herbs fit the flavor profile I am shooting for. Sometimes I finish the sautee with a vin jaune, sherry, madeira, etc.


 


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

RuthWells's picture

(post #31455, reply #8 of 33)

Thanks for the tips!


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

assibams's picture

(post #31455, reply #10 of 33)

Yes, definitely sautee first! Brings out a lot more flavor, and the mushrooms won't soak up all the liquid and get mushy. Are you picking them yourself or buying from a grocer? You might want to stay away from regular (yellow) chanterelles, as they are hard to digest for some people, trumpet chanterelles are a much better - and tastier - choice. Other good mushrooms are boletes, russulae, gypsies. Generally speaking will mushrooms with tubes (like boletes) tend to become softer, almost to the point of sliminess, whereas the ones with gills don't soften up that much. With tube mushrooms try to stick to younger specimen.


Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Jean's picture

(post #31455, reply #9 of 33)

I added your notes to my recipe, thanks.

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Lword's picture

(post #31455, reply #12 of 33)

Do you make your own mushroom stock? I'm also looking for an online dried mushroom source if you or anyone has one to recommend. TIA :)

L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa

L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
Wolvie's picture

(post #31455, reply #13 of 33)

I usually get mine from www.earthy.com, they have very good quality.


Several great sources out there, this one looks good:


www.oregonmushrooms.com


Have fun!


If, 2 1/2 years in, you don't control the only road linking your military airport to your headquarters, you don't control much of anything


Lewis Simons

 

Lword's picture

(post #31455, reply #26 of 33)

Thanks very much, I am drooling and about to let go of some money. I think I'll start with this one


http://www.oregonmushrooms.com/dried_mushroom_sampler_pack


I like the earthy.com site too but so far they seem to not have such a small sampler, or as cheap, but maybe their $49 sampler is a better deal in the long run.


My mushroom sampling has been quite limited - didn't care for portabellos masquerading as a faux "burger" and the little tiny white long-stemmed ones - enoki? were forgettable except a bit slippery, along with the garden variety white button which I adore raw, in butter or home-dried. It's nice they're also the least expensive and most available. Shiitake is another I've had both fresh and dried and love but never enough to see if buying fresh and drying was cost effective compared to buying dried.


This is going to be a chance to try four varieties I've never had - that I know of.


One ounce of Dried Morels, AA Porcini, Matsutake and Chantrelles for a total of 4 oz. $22 versus the earthy.com offering:


morels, chanterelles, porcini, shiitake, black trumpets, and oyster mushrooms – in an attractively packaged sampler. 6 oz $49


I don't want to pay for the attractive packaging if that is the cause of the price differential, but it could be the type of mushrooms being offered - I haven't investigated that far yet. Sure wish an Asian store wasn't such a trek or parking hassle and online might do the trick, once I determine which I like. Thanks again :)


L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
Wolvie's picture

(post #31455, reply #27 of 33)

sounds cool - let me know how the quality is - I just found that site when I was looking around - and earthy is a tad expensive. :-)

If, 2 1/2 years in, you don't control the only road linking your military airport to your headquarters, you don't control much of anything


Lewis Simons

 

transona5's picture

(post #31455, reply #28 of 33)

I order mine from :

www.scandinavianspice.com

They have a 1# jar with a mixture of porcini(cepes), chanterelles, trumpet, morels, and another viariety I can't remember, for $26.95. I also get the 1# jar of porcini which went up $15 dollars since I last ordered!

Edited to add : Look under Specialties - sub-catagory mushrooms. the mixture is on the second page.

 


Edited 10/3/2005 11:02 am ET by transona5

 

Lword's picture

(post #31455, reply #29 of 33)

That's a much better price. Next time I'll try them, thanks, and shame on my itchy finger - don't shop while hungry or when learning curve=low ;) 


Not having tasted them before I don't know how valuable my experience will be to anyone else - maybe for some strange reason I won't like them all that much despite the expense! Happened with caviar.


Here are the five varieties Scandinavianspice offers in their 1 pound $27 deal: Cepes, Trumpet, Porcini, Chanterelles, and Morel.


L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
transona5's picture

(post #31455, reply #30 of 33)

The best deal on dried mushrooms I ever got was 5# of shiitake for $15 I found in Chinatown in S.F. I'm still working my way through them after two years! Also found some cool hockey puck sized white ones (don't ask me the name - it was in Chinese) that look like coral. They look great nestled in a clear broth.

 

 

Wolvie's picture

(post #31455, reply #32 of 33)

I just bookmarked that site as well - never hurts to save money. :-)

If, 2 1/2 years in, you don't control the only road linking your military airport to your headquarters, you don't control much of anything


Lewis Simons

 

assibams's picture

(post #31455, reply #31 of 33)

My parents foraged the Swedish forests and dried 60 kilos of porcini, returning to Austria with 6 kilos of dried mushrooms. And yes, they did travel with their dehydrator LOL


Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

AnnL's picture

(post #31455, reply #17 of 33)

Can you give me the recipe for your mushroom/fennel stock?  A friend of mine has just gone vegetarian and she is not satisfied with substituting vegetable stock for chicken stock in several of her recipes.  I'm thinking this stock might have a rich enough flavor to substitute for chicken stock? 

AnnL
Transitions Farm
Gardening, cooking, and riding
in Central Mass.

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

butterscotch's picture

(post #31455, reply #20 of 33)

Ann--With respect to most risotto recipes, I think your friend is absolutely right--they taste flat when made with vegetable stocks alone. My feeling is that mushroom risotto tastes better when made with a meat or poultry stock but tasty vegetarian versions can be made, even without creating a stock like RisottoGirl's. Many recipes call for a combination of dried and fresh mushrooms. The dried mushroom specified is usually porcini. Porcini retain a lot of their flavor when dried. In order to use them in risotto, you steep them first in very hot water to reconstitute them.  The steeping produces a dark brown, very intensely porcini-flavored liquid that can be used in place of some of the stock when cooking the risotto. (It's important to strain the liquid before using because dried porcini are often sold dirty and gritty.)  I'm sure that a stock based on a good amount of this soaking liquid would be fabulous, but the liquid on its own is pretty great. And, of course, the over-all flavor of the risotto can be punched up with stock, fresh herbs, and wine. Red wines are very nice in mushroom risotto.

AnnL's picture

(post #31455, reply #22 of 33)

Thanks.  I use dried porcini with a chicken dish--the soaking liquid goes into the sauce and I love that earthy taste.  That's why I thought a mushroom stock might do better than a straight veggie stock.  The wine is a good idea, also. 


AnnL
Transitions Farm
Gardening, cooking, and riding
in Central Mass.

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Risottogirl's picture

(post #31455, reply #21 of 33)

I don't really have a recipe. I regularly use lots of mushrooms, fennel and leeks so I keep the trimmings in a gallon ziplock in the freezer until the bag is full and then I make some stock. I use mushroom feet, the outer layers of fennel bulbs and the tough stalks and the green part of the leeks and sometimes celery, onion and carrot trimmings. Everything is washed before it goes into the freezer.


Obviously the stock varies depending on what is in the bag, so sometimes I add more of smothing in order to balance it out. I chop up the trimmings and brown them well on the stove top or sometimes in the oven, then I add about 2 liters of water per ziploc bag of trimmings and whole allspice and peppercorns as well as some laurel and herb trimmings. I cook for about 40 minutes and then taste and strain - nets about 1.5 liters of finished stock. I don't salt my stock but you certainly could.


It is generally pretty tasty, but it is dark in color so that may limit its use somewhat.


 


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

AnnL's picture

(post #31455, reply #23 of 33)

Thanks. I've never made a veggie stock, so wasn't sure what would go in.  I think I'll try this myself.  :-)

AnnL
Transitions Farm
Gardening, cooking, and riding
in Central Mass.

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Risottogirl's picture

(post #31455, reply #25 of 33)

For a regular veggie stock (rather than fennel/mush), I'd use more leeks and carrots. Just avoid peppers and anything cabbagy.

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

dlish's picture

(post #31455, reply #11 of 33)

This is one I have used and I think it is really excellent. It is from the Giada DeLaurentiis book "Everyday Italian." I hope you enjoy it!

Mushroom Risotto with Peas

8 cups canned low-salt chicken broth
1/2-ounce dried porcini mushrooms
1/4 cup unsalted butter
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 cups finely chopped onions
10 ounces white mushrooms, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 1/2 cups Arborio rice or short-grain white rice
2/3 cup dry white wine
3/4 cup frozen peas, thawed
2/3 cup grated Parmesan
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, optional

Bring the broth to a simmer in a heavy medium saucepan. Add the porcini mushrooms. Set aside until the mushrooms are tender, about 5 minutes. Keep the broth warm over very low heat.

Melt the butter in a heavy large saucepan over medium heat. Add olive oil. Add the onions and saute until tender, about 8 minutes. Add the white mushrooms and garlic. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the porcini mushrooms to a cutting board. Finely chop the mushrooms and add to the saucepan. Saute until the mushrooms are tender and the juices evaporate, about 5 minutes. Stir in the rice and let it toast for a few minutes. Add the wine; cook until the liquid is absorbed, stirring often, about 2 minutes. Add 1 cup of hot broth; simmer over medium-low heat until the liquid is absorbed, stirring often, about 3 minutes. Continue to cook until the rice is just tender and the mixture is creamy, adding more broth by cupfuls and stirring often, about 28 minutes (the rice will absorb 6 to 8 cups of broth). Stir in the peas. Mix in the Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.

Gretchen's picture

(post #31455, reply #14 of 33)

Ruth, did you see my post about holding risotto and finishing at the last minute so you don't need to be standing over it?  It was from the culinary arts week-end we just had.  Youcook it to the last addition of stock (without the other additions you are doing--like your mushrooms), put it on a parchment lined sheet and cool quickly. Then he (the chef at Julia's Kitchen in Copia) just brings it to temp, adds the remaining stock and ingredients (his were tomatoes and lobster), and finishes it.

Gretchen

Gretchen
RuthWells's picture

(post #31455, reply #15 of 33)

Thanks for that tip, Gretchen.  Unfortunately, logistics being what they are, we will actually complete the risotto on Monday night to reheat and serve on Tuesday night.  There's no way we'll be able to finish it off in situ.  But, we are not serving gourmands, so I daresay they'll forgive us!  ; )


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

Gretchen's picture

(post #31455, reply #16 of 33)

If you are going to reheat, why not (just asking).  It seemed he was describing a 5 minute situation.  Somewhere there is a baked risotto recipe. Maybe that would help out also.

Gretchen

Gretchen