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Searing

rebaj's picture

Searing (post #30389)

Although I know many things about great cooking, I am not doing a good job with searing. Any great tips for searing meat (steaks and roasts) I will be grateful...


Thanks so much....


Reba

courgette's picture

(post #30389, reply #1 of 24)

Its easy-just throw it in a hot pan with a little oil and DON"T move it until it gets nice and brown, crusty if you want . The hard part is not peaking. It will stick to the pan at first but will release as it browns at which point you can lift it to check the progress.  Hope this helps. I'm sure someone with much more knowledge than I will be along shortly.

gjander's picture

(post #30389, reply #2 of 24)

That is the key thing--don't move it until the sear has developed.  The choice of pan is also important.  Make sure you use a good heavy pan that will heat evenly and retain it well.  All-Clad works well for this as would a nice cast iron pan.

Marcia's picture

(post #30389, reply #3 of 24)

Reba, do make sure your meat is completely dry and do season it, but just before putting it in the pan. Don't use a nonstick pan. Preheat the pan well, then use oil, or a combo of butter and oil.


What exactly are you doing? If we knew, we might be able to pinpoint your problem.

sommersu's picture

(post #30389, reply #4 of 24)

The key elements of searing have been given to you dry meat,heavy pan, not non stick, a bit of oil or combo of oil and butter, make sure pan and oil are hot, turn meat once, no peaking..I will add one word to all the advise. PATIENCE.

sommersu's picture

(post #30389, reply #9 of 24)

If your problem is flavor and moisture it may not be a searing problem at all. What kind of steak are you grilling? Do you season it well? Does it have good marbeling? Both will add to flavor and moist not dry meat. As for the pork roast there are issues as to the fat content of pork, that may lead to a dry outcome. How are you cooking your pork roast?
And welcome, I am fairly new here as well and its a very helpful sight.

rebaj's picture

(post #30389, reply #10 of 24)

Suz,


Typically I am cooking a filet mignon or a New York Strip steak. Seasoning is usually salt and pepper or a homemade marinade (worscteshire, lemon, butter, pepper). Talk to me about searing on the charcoal grill. I feel I am buying good cuts of meat.


When cooking a pork roast I would normally have a pork loin or a tenderloin. I will usually trim the fat from the loin. I have been browning it in a pan, putting seasoning on the meat, place it in a roasting pan on a rack along with a small amount of water and usually onions and cook it covered for 30 minutes per pound at 350.


Thanks so much.....wooooo-hooooo.... I love you people already.

Gretchen's picture

(post #30389, reply #14 of 24)

If you are doing a pork tenderloin, sear it and then finish in a 450* oven for about 15 minutes.


If you are cooking a pork loin covered with water 30 minutes/lb.--and have cut the fat off, there isn't much reason to sear.  You are basically almost braising--and perhaps overcooking. The loin is such a lean cut of meat in this day and time that it makes for a dry tasteless roast, particularly if cooked past 145* internal temp.  It does make a wonderful braise with apples and onions (see the T&T folder).  Also, when cooking the loin, it will make a difference if it is a boned and tied roast which is basically 2 halves of loin tied together, or if it is a single piece of meat.  The former, being a larger cylinder of meat, will of course, take longer to roast.
I encourage you if you are roasting a loin, do it uncovered and only to 145*.


Gretchen
Gretchen
MEANCHEF's picture

(post #30389, reply #22 of 24)

That sounds kind of overdone for pork tenderloin.  I do mine at 400 for 12 minutes.

Gretchen's picture

(post #30389, reply #23 of 24)

I do check it with  a thermometer.  Probably so.

Gretchen

Gretchen
gjander's picture

(post #30389, reply #11 of 24)

Make sure you are letting your meat rest after cooking so that it will relax and to allow the juices to be soaked back in.  This is one of my bigger problems.  I have usually timed everything to be finished at the same time and then don't want to let everything else get cold while my meat is resting.  If you don't do this, the meat will not be as tender or moist.  Also, you may want to consider brining for a pork roast if you find they are too dry.


Edited to say that I meant to reply to the orginal poster.


Edited 1/30/2005 7:03 am ET by GJANDER

Wolvie's picture

(post #30389, reply #13 of 24)

I let my meat / roasts/ etc rest as I roast my veggies, or whatever.  That usually means starting it as the rest begins, because I generally give at least 10 minutes resting to things. Big roasts up to 20 -30 minutes.


Hey - do you have a hot pot set up? (question is not as weird as it sounds)


Men in authority will always think that criticism of their policies is dangerous. They will always equate their policies with patriotism, and find criticism subversive.   Henry Steele Commager



 

 

gjander's picture

(post #30389, reply #15 of 24)

You mean like an electric kettle?  Or a hot plate?  Answer on both counts is 'no' though.  We did have an electric kettle while we were remodeling the kitchen but I think we donated it to the local thrift shop after we were done.

Wolvie's picture

(post #30389, reply #16 of 24)

no no - for fire pot dining - somewhat like a fondue set up, but a bit different.


I know you don't have an electric wok. (right?)


Men in authority will always think that criticism of their policies is dangerous. They will always equate their policies with patriotism, and find criticism subversive.   Henry Steele Commager



 

 

gjander's picture

(post #30389, reply #17 of 24)

No, we don't have one of those either.  We've been on a bit of a fondue kick lately but are decidely low tech about it.  We just light a few tea lights and put them under a small rack on the table.  A stainless steel pot with the fondue sits on that.  The waxy smoke from the candles is a pain to clean though--really should probably get sterno.

Wolvie's picture

(post #30389, reply #18 of 24)

I have sterno - I'll bring some. :-)


 


Men in authority will always think that criticism of their policies is dangerous. They will always equate their policies with patriotism, and find criticism subversive.   Henry Steele Commager



 

 

Gretchen's picture

(post #30389, reply #19 of 24)

Get sterno also for a hotter fire which really helps fondue to cook better.

Gretchen

Gretchen
gjander's picture

(post #30389, reply #20 of 24)

Well, it's just cheese fondue--not cooking meats and such at the table.  I've already made it on the stove and the candles are just to keep it warm.  But, I agree sterno would be better...

Gretchen's picture

(post #30389, reply #21 of 24)

Oh, okay. Wolvie was talking about a Mongolian hot pot, I think, where you use broth to cook meat, seafood, and veggies. It is a lot of fun, healthy and delicious.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Wolvie's picture

(post #30389, reply #24 of 24)

yep - that's it.


You asked about a SB menu - not sure of the complete deal yet, but I think ribs and meanies version of the spanish tortilla are definites.


Men in authority will always think that criticism of their policies is dangerous. They will always equate their policies with patriotism, and find criticism subversive.   Henry Steele Commager



 

 

Beebs's picture

(post #30389, reply #12 of 24)

I'll add one more - don't crowd the pan.

Sandy

rebaj's picture

(post #30389, reply #5 of 24)

Thanks for all of the great advice. I was not aware that I should be starting with dry meat.Maybe this is the problem. It is usually a steak on the grill or a pork loin/ roast that I am searing....(or TRYING to sear). I just feel that my searing process is not really aiding in retaining flavor, moisture in my product.


WOW!...I just started here this morning and I am so pleased with the response to my post. Thanks guys....


Reba

Marcia's picture

(post #30389, reply #6 of 24)

I didn't realize that you were new. Welcome, Reba.

Lword's picture

(post #30389, reply #7 of 24)

Welcome reba, you'll like it here :) One other thing, meat at room temp.

L.

L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
Adele's picture

(post #30389, reply #8 of 24)

Welcome reba!  I'll vouch for the heavy pan.  Couldn't understand why something so 'easy' wasn't working for me.  I couldn't get an even heat with the pans I had. 

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!