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sclbcake's picture

scones (post #35488)

I thought I would give the one who provided me the scone guidance a good laugh and make her day and anyone else....while making the "tea party" scones with EM's guidance and someone else in FC(thank goodness), I was @ the finishing point of forming them and realized I had left out the dad gum sugar so I threw it in on top of everything else...does anyone else ever do things like this ????anyway, they are in the freezer....Haven't baked them yet....thanks for all your help...this will be a FC tea party...what happened to the tea party project ???

dlish's picture

(post #35488, reply #1 of 47)

Ha! I forget the vanilla all the time. Just put a lot of sugar on the top! I'm sure whatever you mixed-in will distract.

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #35488, reply #2 of 47)

I never use sugar in scones. If it's a sweet scone, I just assume there's enough sugar in the jam or cream I serve with it.





"the meat was prime,/the produce sublime,/but nevertheless/the dinner was/a horrible mess."
Samchang, 2007

Syrah's picture

(post #35488, reply #4 of 47)

I agree. My mother's scone recipe contains self raising flour, butter and milk. We added cheese and or herbs for a savoury scone topping.

They are also shaped into rounds not wedges.

I believe in champagne...


Edited 1/30/2008 8:17 am by Syrah

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

TracyK's picture

(post #35488, reply #5 of 47)

In the US that's a biscuit. :-)


Scones in the US generally are sweeter (though not as sweet as muffins), and often wedge-shaped.


CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

Jean's picture

(post #35488, reply #6 of 47)

I prefer savory ones myself. I posted a recipe a while back.


http://forums.taunton.com/tp-cookstalk/messages?msg=33212.1




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A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
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help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Syrah's picture

(post #35488, reply #8 of 47)

I know. It's a cultural divide.

My scones with jam, whipped cream and tea.. = devonshire tea.

I believe in champagne...

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

TracyK's picture

(post #35488, reply #9 of 47)

Yum... personally I don't care what they're called, so long as they're fresh and delicious. ;-)

CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

shoechick's picture

(post #35488, reply #10 of 47)

WHIPPED CREAM????  Women, go out and get some clotted cream for the real thing :)

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

soupereasy's picture

(post #35488, reply #11 of 47)

You have it!

Lazio1954's picture

(post #35488, reply #12 of 47)

Amen to that!!

Silvana

We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give.
Winston Churchill

Silvana We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give. Winston Churchill
Plover's picture

(post #35488, reply #13 of 47)

"and where does a person find clotted cream?" she asked quietly.

There used to be a restaurant here where I would sometimes go for scones and Devonshire cream and strawberry preserves.

But I never did know what devonshire cream was.

shoechick's picture

(post #35488, reply #14 of 47)

It's in a few grocery stores here.  All depends on your area. 

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #35488, reply #15 of 47)

Is Devonshire cream the same thing as clotted?

shoechick's picture

(post #35488, reply #16 of 47)

Yep.

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #35488, reply #17 of 47)

Next question, is there any way to make it at home? I recently splurged on a little jar of it at the supermarket, and the flavor underwhelmed me compared to what I've eaten in England.

shoechick's picture

(post #35488, reply #18 of 47)

Can't say I've ever tried, but I found this...from the link below... Mascapone and Whipping Cream..YUM!!


It is possible to make clotted cream at home, using much the same techniques. For cooks who do not have access to unpasteurized milk, lightly pasteurized, but not homogenized, milk may be used. Mixing milk with whipping cream may yield more clotted cream at the end. Some cooks also make a reasonable approximation of clotted cream with mascarpone cheese beaten with whipping cream.


http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-clotted-cream.htm


 


The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #35488, reply #19 of 47)

Hmmm, I'm pretty sure I can get my hands on non-homogonized milk...

shoechick's picture

(post #35488, reply #20 of 47)

Let us know if it works out, or if you live through the experiment :)

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

Presbytera Mary Zubricky's picture

(post #35488, reply #25 of 47)

Here is a recipe for Mock Devonshire or clotted cream I found in a newspaper years ago. It's from the Hotel St. Francis in San Francisco:
3 ounce pkg of cream cheese
1/4 cup powdered sugar
1/4 cup sour cream
1/8 tsp. almond extract
1 Tbsp. milk
Combine cream cheese, sugar and sour cream in a small bowl. Beat until fluffy. Add almond extract and milk to thin a little. Blend well. Let sit @ room temperature for 30 minutes before serving. Makes enough for 12 scones.

I've skipped leaving it at room temperature for 30 minutes when I'm in a hurry to serve it. It doesn't seem to matter. Everyone I've served it to has loved it.It's an inexpensive and delicious substitute.

Syrah's picture

(post #35488, reply #21 of 47)

Gotta tell you, I don't think I have ever seen clotted cream and then I saw this. I

Clotted cream is a thick yellow cream made by heating unpasteurized cow's milk and then leaving it in shallow pans for several hours. During this time, the cream content rises to the surface and forms 'clots'. Clotted cream purists prefer the milk to come from cows in the West Country, mainly from Devon and Cornwall..from wikipedia.

t is the unpasteurised milk that would be the issue. Australia won't allow it to be imported.

I believe in champagne...

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

sclbcake's picture

(post #35488, reply #3 of 47)

they were delish ! but not too brown...what was the object of freezing them for 20 min. before baking ?

dlish's picture

(post #35488, reply #7 of 47)

Hmmm ... the recipe doesn't say to freeze before baking. However, I usually make a bunch ahead and bake them from frozen. Did you have the oven at 400? That usually works. I get scones that are a bit browner on the bottom and golden on top. Did you do an egg or cream wash? Sometimes that helps with browning.

sclbcake's picture

(post #35488, reply #23 of 47)

I did not bake @ 400...that was the problem...I will bake them some more before the party and they will be fine....they are delish !! thanks

LuciaK's picture

(post #35488, reply #22 of 47)

Has anyone tried the scone "origami" from CI last summer. It was in a recipe for Blueberry scones. The blueberry scones were wonderful, and I tried the technique on the Cream Cheese Apricot Scones from King Arthur Baking Book. Folding the dough made them rise higher.

Animal crackers and cocoa to drink,


that is the finest of suppers I think.


 When I'm grown up and can have what I please,


I think I shall always insist upon these.

Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.

www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

mishmish's picture

(post #35488, reply #24 of 47)

In some states in the Mountain West, especially Utah and Idaho, a "scone" commonly refers to a deep fried bread usually eaten with honey butter. It is similar to frybread or sopaipilla. No one seems to know why they are called scones but if you get past the name what's not to like about deep fried dough! :)
I remember my aunt taking me out to dinner in Utah (where I was served an abomination of brown gravy on a chicken fried steak but that is another story) and saying we could have scones for desert. Not my idea of desert but I went with it. They were what I would call a giant sopaipilla and very tasty with honey.
Another one of those Utah mystery foods like fry sauce, green jello and funeral potatoes.

Don't let your mind wander. It's much to small to be out by itself.

Don't let your mind wander. It's much to small to be out by itself.
veronica320's picture

(post #35488, reply #26 of 47)

Lucia,

Would you please elaborate a little on this folding technique? I'm picturing something like puff pastry folding. Is it like that? My scones of late really need help.
Thanks.
V.

Plover's picture

(post #35488, reply #27 of 47)

I consider this to be a rather good and quite forgiving scone recipe.

The only thing I do differently than the recipe says is to freeze the butter until it is solid, and then grate it into the mixed dry ingredients on the large holes of a box grater. I use currants instead of raisins cause I think raisins are too sweet in this. I used chopped dried sour cherries once and it was sensational, if I say so myself.

Just handle the dough gently, and you'll be fine.

Matlick house buttermilk scones
Stir together:
3 cups flour
½ cup sugar
1 tbs. Baking powder
1 tsp. Salt
Cut in:
½ cup unsalted butter
Stir in:
1 cup currants or raisins
Stir in to form a soft dough:
2 eggs
2/3 cup buttermilk
Divide dough in two parts and shape each into an 8" round. Transfer to baking sheet and brush with a mixture of:
1 egg
1 tbs. Milk or cream
Score with a knife into 8 wedges. Bake for 18 - 20 minutes at 375, or until a lovely golden brown.

LuciaK's picture

(post #35488, reply #28 of 47)

Yes, similar to a laminated puff pastry. It's from the July 2007 issue & the recipe is in the subscription part of the CI website. I subscribe to the magazine, but not the website. Briefly, you roll the dough into a 12 inch square, press the blueberries into the dough, and fold the dough into an envelope shape, flatten it and then cut out the wedges from the rectangle shape. I need to dig through my magazines downstairs to find the exact technique & can elaborate further tomorrow. I tried the blueberry scones and they were perfect & I used the same technique on other scones & they puffed up beautifully with gorgeous layers.

Animal crackers and cocoa to drink,


that is the finest of suppers I think.


 When I'm grown up and can have what I please,


I think I shall always insist upon these.

Minivan Mom. Fueled by Caffeine.

www.acookandherbooks.blogspot.com

veronica320's picture

(post #35488, reply #29 of 47)

Thank you. I tried the CI site before asking you. I think I get the idea, though. Will sure give it a try.

V.

Jean's picture

(post #35488, reply #30 of 47)

I don't have that issue, is there any chance you could post the recipe?



Birthdays are good for you. The more you have, the longer you live.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need